White Mountains Environmental Photography


Happy Earth Day 2021, New Hampshire

Earth Day, a small cascade on a tributary of Lost River in Kinsman Notch in North Woodstock, New Hampshire during the spring months.
Tributary of Lost River – Kinsman Notch, New Hampshire
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2021 – Happy Earth Day from the New Hampshire White Mountains! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here. In the 21st-century, it is essential that we understand the impact we have on the environment. Education and proper training can help control the problem.

Continue reading right arrow

White Mountains, April History

White Mountains, April history; moonrise behind Mount Eisenhower in the White Mountains of New Hampshire USA during the spring months.
Mount Eisenhower Moonrise (April, 2015) – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

White Mountains, April History – When it comes to the history of the New Hampshire White Mountains, like March, so many historical events took place throughout the years during the month of April that listing all of them isn’t possible. So included here are just a few interesting historical events.

The first reference is for the hikers. In April 1863, Professor Albert Hopkins, a professor at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts, founded the Alpine Club of Williamstown. Recognized by most as the first hiking club in America, the club remained active only until 1865, but they did hike in the White Mountains.

Continue reading right arrow

White Mountains, March History

White Mountains, March history; Scenic view from the summit of Mount Tecumseh in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire during the spring months. This mountain is named for the Shawnee chief, Tecumseh (1768–1813).
Mount Tecumseh – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

White Mountains, March History – When it comes to the history of the New Hampshire White Mountains, throughout the years, March was an active month. In fact, so many historical events took place during this month listing all of them would require more time than I have. So included here are just a few interesting events that happened.

A few of the more significant March events are President William Howard Taft signing the Weeks Act on March 1, 1911. And the Appalachian Mountain Club’s second meeting on March 8, 1876; at this meeting, it was voted to allow women to join the club. Both of these events impacted the White Mountains greatly.

Continue reading right arrow

White Mountains, February History

White Mountains, February history; a winter hiker ascending the Air Line Trail in extreme weather conditions in the White Mountains, New Hampshire
Air Line Trail – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

White Mountains, February History – The history of the New Hampshire White Mountains can be looked at from many different perspectives. One of the more interesting ways to look at it is from a monthly viewpoint.

From a historical point of view, February is a deadly month in the White Mountains. Throughout the years, avalanches, climbing falls, hypothermia, and skiing accidents have taken a number of lives during this month. Most of these incidents have been well documented, so below are a few not so well known events that happened during the month of February.

Continue reading right arrow

Weeks State Park, New Hampshire

Weeks State Park - John Wingate Weeks Estate on the summit of Mt. Prospect in Lancaster, New Hampshire USA. The Mount Prospect Tower was built by John W. Weeks in 1912 and is still in operation today.
Weeks State Park – Lancaster, New Hampshire 
 

Weeks State Park, New Hampshire – Weeks State Park is a 420-acre, more or less, property on Mt. Prospect in Lancaster, New Hampshire. The main attraction of the park is the historical Weeks Estate on the summit. Built in 1912 for John Wingate Weeks (1860-1926), the main house is built of fieldstone and stucco.

Born in Lancaster on April 11, 1860, John Wingate Weeks was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts. He was a leading conservationist, congressman, senator, and secretary of war but is best known for the Weeks Act of 1911. The Weeks Act authorized the Federal Government to purchase private land in the eastern United States and maintain the land as national forests. He is the reason why we have the White Mountain National Forest.

Continue reading right arrow

2020 Year in Review, White Mountains

The Pemigewasset River near the Flume Visitor Center in Franconia Notch State Park in Lincoln, New Hampshire covered in snow on a cloudy autumn day.
Pemigewasset River – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

2020 Year in Review, White Mountains – As the year comes to an end, I am still trying to understand this pandemic. And I am also still trying to grasp how badly overrun the White Mountains have been this year. While there appears to be a vaccine for the virus, there is no immediate solution for the current human impact issue here in the White Mountains.

If you live in the White Mountains region, did you ever think the outdoor community would be fighting about the definition of “local” and vehicles at trailheads being vandalized just because they have out-of-state license plates? With social media fueling the fire, this year has been an awful display of what the White Mountains outdoor community is all about. For better or worse, social media has changed outdoor recreation.

Continue reading right arrow

Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad

Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad in the New Hampshire White Mountains.
Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad – Incorporated in March 1909, this short-lived logging railroad was operated by the Woodstock Lumber Company, a subsidy of the Parker-Young Company. It began at the Woodstock Lumber Company’s sawmill (built by the Publishers Paper Company) on the western bank of the Pemigewasset River in Woodstock, New Hampshire. From the mill, it traveled roughly 7 miles into the Eastman Brook drainage, traveling through the northern portion of Thornton*, known as the “Gore”, ending in Livermore.

For a couple of years before the railroad was built, horse teams were used to drag logs out of the forest to the Woodstock sawmill. But once the Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad was established, the Iron Horse took over the duties. Some of Tripoli Road and Little East Pond Trail utilize the old railroad bed. Three Shay geared locomotives, all 50-tonners, were used on the railroad, and the track equipment was leased from the Boston & Maine Railroad.

Continue reading right arrow