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National Trails Day, White Mountains

Group of hikers travel along the Tuckerman Crossover Trail in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA during the summer months. Mount Monroe is in the background.
Tuckerman Crossover – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

National Trails Day, White Mountains – Today is American Hiking Society’s National Trails Day, an annual event held on the first Saturday in June. And the intention of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for America's Trail system. It is also a day to recognize the work of all the volunteers who do trail maintenance along America’s trail system.

As environmental photographer and a hiker of the New Hampshire White Mountains, I appreciate all the work that volunteers do along the White Mountains trail system. And to all you adopt-a-trail volunteers, who are truly only volunteering to give back to the White Mountains, THANK YOU.

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Waterfalls on Cascade Brook, Franconia Notch

Cascade Brook in Lincoln, New Hampshire on a spring day. This brook is located along the Basin-Cascades Trail.
Cascade Brook – Basin-Cascades Trail, New Hampshire
 

Waterfalls on Cascade Brook, Franconia Notch Waterfall enthusiasts will love exploring Cascade Brook in Lincoln, New Hampshire. The Basin-Cascades Trail travels in the area of Cascade Brook. And for the most part, all of the cascades in this blog article are on the side of the trail. But they are not roadside, and one must hike up the Basin-Cascades Trail to reach them.

In the 1870s book, I Go A-fishing by William Cowper Prime, he describes Cascade Brook as being one of the finest brooks in America for scenery and small trout. In 1876, Mr. Prime and W.F. Bridge bought Moran Lake and the land around it. They renamed the lake “Lonesome Lake” and had a private cabin on it. And they spent time fishing on the brooks in the area. It is worth mentioning that in the early days Lonesome Lake was known as Tamarack Pond and Moran Lake.

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Trail Blazing, Trail Stewardship

A properly applied trail blaze along the Artist's Bluff Path in  White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Proper Trail Blaze – Artist's Bluff Path, New Hampshire
 

Trail Blazing, Trail Stewardship – I have been hearing more and more complaints about trail blazing along the White Mountains trail system. Either the trail is excessively blazed or not blazed enough. Personally, I don’t mind the trails that have little trail blazing. But I am not a fan of the excessive trail blazing. Over the years I have photographed different types of blazing styles and today I going to share a few of them with you.

Proper trail blazing protocol seems to vary among the trail maintenance organizations, but the ending result is the same. And most of these organizations agree that a standard trail blaze is a two inch by six inch rectangle placed about head height on trees. No painting of arrows, only a single vertical blaze, should be painted on a tree. For more information on blazing see the Randolph Mountain Club’s trail blazing protocol page.

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Happy Earth Day 2017, New Hampshire

Happy Earth Day! Sunset along the Appalachian Trail (Gulfside Trail) near Mount Clay in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA during the summer months.
Sunset – Gulfside Trail, White Mountains
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2017 – Happy Earth Day from New Hampshire! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here.

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East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Trestle 7

Foot bridge along the Lincoln Woods Trail which crosses Franconia Brook in Lincoln, New Hampshire. Hikers enter into the Pemigewasset Wilderness on the righthand side of this bridge. Old abutments from Trestle 7 of the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948) are used to support this foot bridge.
East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Trestle 7 (Franconia Brook )
 

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Trestle 7 – During the days of the East Branch & Lincoln (EB&L) Railroad, there were two trestles built at this crossing of Franconia Brook (above). And each trestle serviced different areas of today’s Pemigewasset Wilderness. The first trestle built serviced the Franconia Brook and Lincoln Brook Valleys. And the second trestle, built just below the first one, serviced the area surrounding the East and North Fork branches of the Pemigewasset River.

Trestle 7 is different than most trestles along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad because part of it is still in use today. No log trains pass over it anymore, but hikers use it on a regular basis.

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Thornton Gore Hill Farming Settlement

Remnants of an old hay rake at Thornton Gore in Thornton, New Hampshire.
Old Hay Rake – Thornton Gore, New Hampshire
 

Thornton Gore Hill Farming Settlement – Many consider Thornton Gore or the "Gore” to be the northern section of Thornton New Hampshire in the area of where Talford and Eastman Brook meet. However, I am currently reading Family Farm by Dick Bradley. And he refers to farms that were located just north of Johnson Brook as being part of the Gore. That area seems to be a little further south of the area today’s historians consider to be the Gore. But because Bradley lived in the Gore, I would have to say his information is accurate.

My work is based on an 1860 map of Thornton by H.F. Walling, a couple of historic resources, and days of field research. And I have focused mainly on the area surrounding Talford and Eastman Brook. This section of Thornton Gore had a bunch of farms, a few mills, a school, two cemeteries, and a church. The 1860 map I am using shows at least twenty-two dwellings in this area.

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