Posts Categorized: Abandoned Places



Village of Wildwood, New Hampshire

Site of the Wildwood settlement along Route 112 in the town of Easton, New Hampshire. Wildwood was a logging settlement during the 20th century along the Wild Ammonoosuc River. The first Civilian Conservation Corps camp authorized in New Hampshire was also located at Wildwood.
Wildwood – Easton, New Hampshire
 

Village of Wildwood, New Hampshire – When it comes to the abandoned villages in New Hampshire, the logging village of Livermore is often included in the conversation. But the story of the lesser known village of Wildwood is a fascinating piece of White Mountains history. The area known as Wildwood is located along the Wild Ammonoosuc River in the general area of the junction of Route 112 and Tunnel Brook Road in Easton, New Hampshire. Today’s Route 112 travels through Wildwood.

Easton was incorporated into a separate township by an act passed in July 1876. The section of Easton known as Wildwood was once part of Landaff and before that part of Lincoln. And the scenic Wild Ammonoosuc River, known for the early log drives done on it, flows through Easton.

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Beebe River Railroad, New Hampshire

Beebe River Railroad country - Reflection of autumn foliage in Kiah Pond in Sandwich, New Hampshire on a cloudy autumn day.
Kiah Pond – Beebe River Railroad Country
 

Beebe River Railroad, New Hampshire – In January 1917, the Publishers Paper Company sold the Beebe River land tract (around 22,000 acres) to the Parker-Young Company. And in March 1917, the New Hampshire legislature approved the incorporation of the Beebe River Railroad. Also in the same year, the Woodstock Lumber Company, an affiliate of Parker-Young, built the Beebe River sawmill and mill village in Campton.

From 1917-1924, the Woodstock Lumber Company and Parker-Young operated the mill and railroad. Including sidings and spur lines, the railroad was roughly 25-miles long. It began off the Boston & Maine Railroad in Campton, followed the Beebe River drainage up into Sandwich, and ended near logging Camp 12 at the base of Mount Whiteface in Waterville. Some of the spruce harvested by this railroad was used in the manufacturing of airplanes during World War 1.

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Thornton Gore Hill Farming Settlement

Remnants of an old hay rake at Thornton Gore in Thornton, New Hampshire.
Old Hay Rake – Thornton Gore, New Hampshire
 

Thornton Gore Hill Farming Settlement – Many consider Thornton Gore or the "Gore” to be the northern section of Thornton New Hampshire in the area of where Talford and Eastman Brook meet. However, I am currently reading Family Farm by Dick Bradley. And he refers to farms that were located just north of Johnson Brook as being part of the Gore. That area seems to be a little further south of the area today’s historians consider to be the Gore. But because Bradley lived in the Gore, I would have to say his information is accurate.

My work is based on an 1860 map of Thornton by H.F. Walling, a couple of historic resources, and days of field research. And I have focused mainly on the area surrounding Talford and Eastman Brook. This section of Thornton Gore had a bunch of farms, a few mills, a school, two cemeteries, and a church. The 1860 map I am using shows at least twenty-two dwellings in this area.

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Abandoned Dug Wells, White Mountains

Photo of dug wells. Colonel Lewis B. Smith site in Sandwich Notch in Sandwich, New Hampshire USA. This abandoned farmstead was occupied by three generations of the Smith family from the 18th century to the late 19th century.
Dug Well at Colonel Lewis B. Smith Homestead – Sandwich, New Hampshire
 

Abandoned Dug Wells, White Mountains – Today’s blog article focuses on a keyword. I chose one search term, abandoned dug wells, and searched my image archive for imagery that represents this subject matter. These keyword searches help identify the subjects I need more coverage of. As a photographer, creating an image of an abandoned dug well that is visually interesting can be a challenge.

The New Hampshire White Mountains are littered with abandoned eighteenth and nineteenth century homesteads. And many of these homesteads had a water source – the dug well. These wells were dug by hand to just below the water table and were lined with stones or other material to keep it from collapsing. If you find a dug well in the middle of the forest, there is a good chance you are in the area of an old homestead.

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Abandoned Bemis Granite Quarry

Site of the abandoned Bemis Granite Quarry along the Sawyer River in Harts Location, New Hampshire USA. Dr. Samuel Bemis quarried granite from this site, which he owned at the time, during the 1860s to build Notchland, a granite mansion in Hart’s Location.
Site of The Bemis Granite Quarry – Sawyer River, Hart’s Location
 

The Abandoned Bemis Granite Quarry – I recently photographed the forgotten Bemis Granite Quarry in Hart's Location, New Hampshire. This quarry, located along the Sawyer River (above), is small when compared to other quarries, such as the Redstone Granite Quarry, but the history attached to it is fascinating.

When most people hear mention of the Sawyer River Valley, they automatically associate it with the Sawyer River Railroad and the village of Livermore. But before the logging railroad took over the Sawyer River Valley in the 1870s Dr. Samuel Bemis quarried granite from land, which he owned at the time, along the Sawyer River during the 1860s to build his granite mansion in Hart’s Location.

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Village of Livermore, New Hampshire

Foundation of the sawmill in the abandoned town of Livermore during the autumn months. This was a logging town in the late 19th and early 20th centuries along the Sawyer River Railroad in the New Hampshire White Mountains. Both the town and railroad were owned by the Saunders family.
Sawmill – Livermore, New Hampshire
 

Village of Livermore, New Hampshire – Incorporated by the state of New Hampshire in 1876, Livermore was a logging town in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The village of Livermore was located along the Sawyer River Railroad, on the Sawyer River, in the White Mountains. Both the railroad and town were owned by the Saunders family. At its peak, the population of Livermore was around 150-200 people, but as time progressed more and more people left the town. The town of Livermore was officially dissolved in 1951.

The history of Livermore has been well documented over the years. So instead of repeating what can be easily found on the internet, I will take you on a photo tour of one of the more interesting ghost towns in the New Hampshire White Mountains.

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Sandwich Notch Hill Farming Community

The Andrew Munsey Place home site cellar hole along Sandwich Notch Road in New Hampshire.
Andrew Munsey Home Site – The Notch Community, New Hampshire
 

Sandwich Notch Hill Farming Community – Here is blog article number 2 of a two-part series that focuses on Sandwich Notch in New Hampshire. In part 1, I introduced you to the historic Sandwich Notch Road. And today I will be taking you on a visual journey of the abandoned nineteenth century hill farming community that once was in Sandwich Notch (The Notch).

It is hard to imagine that during the early nineteenth century, thirty to forty families lived in Sandwich Notch. A few Notch farms did strive, but the rocky terrain of the Notch was poor for farming, and it is no surprise that by 1860 only eight families lived in the Notch. Many families in the area left their farms and headed West to where farming was said to be better. By the turn of the twentieth century only one person, Moses Hall, lived in the Notch year around. Now a private residence the Hall Place (below) is the only house left on the Notch Road.

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