Posts Categorized: Conservation



Cog Railway Hotel Proposal, Mt Washington

Mount Washington from Mount Clay in Thompson and Meserve's Purchase, New Hampshire.
Mount Washington Cog Railway – General Area of the Skyline Switch
 

Cog Railway Hotel Proposal, Mt Washington – As you look at the above image can you imagine a 35 room hotel along the Cog Railway in the area you see? I know, it seems far-fetched. But the reality is the Mount Washington Cog Railway is in the early stages of “possibly” building a lodge and restaurant in the area of the Skyline switch along the railway. I am not joking, a hotel in the fragile alpine zone environment.

Public information suggests the proposed hotel will be along the railroad about a mile below the summit, near the Skyline switch. I believe the Skyline switch is in the above section of the railroad (behind the rock cairn). The included images help visualize the general area of the proposed hotel building site on Mount Washington.

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Mount Tecumseh Vandalism, Illegal Cutting

Stumps of trees illegally cut in 2013 are cut flush with the ground on the summit of Mount Tecumseh in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire.
July 2014, Fresh Cutting – Mt Tecumseh, New Hampshire
 

Mount Tecumseh Vandalism, Illegal Cutting – When I first went public with the environmental issues on Mount Tecumseh, I was warned that my business would become the focal point of a smear campaign if I continued to cover the issues. After years of covering issues on this mountain, I can say that the harassment I have received has not deterred me from creating awareness for the human impact on Mount Tecumseh.*

According to Forest Service, the cutting on New Hampshire's Mount Tecumseh is illegal, and is considered vandalism to National Forest land. As far as I know, Forest Service's law enforcement division is still actively investigating the cutting. For my involvement, as a photographer, I have been unofficially volunteering my time to document the cutting. I am against this type of vandalism, and report any findings to Forest Service.

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Mt Tecumseh Trail, New Hampshire

July 2016 - Newly built stone steps along the Mt Tecumseh Trail in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire during the month of July. Minimal stonework should be done along trails, and it should look natural and blend in with the surroundings.
New Staircase (2016) – Mt Tecumseh Trail, New Hampshire
 

Mt Tecumseh Trail, New Hampshire For five years (2011-2016), I documented issues on Mt Tecumseh in New Hampshire. In my opinion, what has happened to the Mt Tecumseh Trail over the last few years is a disgusting display of conservation and trail stewardship. The new stonework built along this trail is all about quantity, not quality, and I question what low impact, sustainable, trail work is.

In August 2016, for the second time since 2012, the Pemigewasset District of Forest Service, at the request of the Washington Office, inspected the ongoing stonework along the Mt Tecumseh Trail. According to a letter I received from Forest Service Supervisor, Tom Wagner, the stonework is “satisfactory” for Forest Service Trail construction standards. And they did find issues that would be taken care of in the future. The definition of satisfactory is “fulfilling expectations or needs; acceptable, though not outstanding or perfect.”

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Mittersill Terrain Improvement Project

View of the Mittersill Terrain Improvement Project, on Mittersill Mountain, from the summit of Bald Mountain in the New Hampshire White Mountains during the spring months. For the last few years, Cannon Mountain and Franconia Ski Club have been working on the Mittersill Terrain Improvement Project. The focus of this project is to create a world-class training and racing slope on Baron’s Run.
View of Mittersill Mountain – Franconia, New Hampshire
 

Mittersill Terrain Improvement Project – Over the last few years, Cannon Mountain and the Franconia Ski Club have been working on an improvement project to better the ski terrain on the Mittersill side of Cannon Mountain. The focus of the project is to create a world-class training and racing slope on Baron’s Run. Based on the little I know abut the project, it seems like it will benefit the ski area and the younger generation of skiers.

But not all are happy with this project and with the way Cannon Mountain operates. And great lengths are being taken to create the illusion that Cannon Mountain is a money sucking worthless enterprise that is costing New Hampshire taxpayers millions. Maybe it is time to consider building condos on Cannon Mountain (joking).

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Scree Walls, Trail Stewardship

Scree walls, hiker descending Boott Spur Trail in the White Mountains, New Hampshire. Afternoon sun reflects off the Wildcat Ski Mountain. A scree wall is in view. Scree walls are built on the edge of trails to discourage hikers from going off trail. Building these small walls helps protect the fragile alpine habitat.
Scree Walls – Boott Spur Trail, New Hampshire
 

Scree Walls, Trail Stewardship – Today’s blog article focuses on a keyword search term. I chose one search term in this case “scree wall” and searched my image archive to see what imagery I have available that represents this area of trail stewardship. As photographer, these keyword searches help me determine what subject matter I need more coverage of. The below imagery showcases this search term.

In the alpine zones of the New Hampshire White Mountains, trail stewards build scree walls on the edge of trails. These non intrusive walls keep hikers on a defined path in the alpine zones, and this helps protect the fragile alpine habitat. Some of the alpine flowers that grow in New Hampshire are rare and only grow in the alpine zones of New Hampshire so protecting this habitat is essential.

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2016 Nature Photography Day

A hiker photographs the Great Gulf from the Appalachian Trail near the summit of Mount Washington in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Great Gulf Wilderness – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

June 15, 2016, National Nature Photography Day – Nature Photography Day was created in 2006 by the North American Nature Photography Association. It is an annual event intended to promote conservation and the enjoyment of nature photography. Today is a day to grab your camera and photograph nature.

You can read more on the history of the event at the North American Nature Photography Association (NANPA) website here. NANPA is also hosting a Nature Photography Day event on their Facebook page

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Mt Willard Section House Vandalism

mt willard - Location of the Mt. Willard Section House, which was at the end of the Willey Brook Trestle along the old Maine Central Railroad in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. This section house was built by the Maine Central Railroad in 1887 to house the section foreman and crew who maintained the track. From 1903-1942 the Hattie Evans family lived at the house, it was destroyed by fire in 1972.
Mt. Willard Section House Site – Maine Central Railroad, Crawford Notch
 

Mt Willard Section House Vandalism – In April 2016 the Conway Scenic Railroad, on their Facebook page, posted that the Evan’s family monument at the Mt Willard Section House site had been recently vandalized. I visited the section house site last month and was disappointed to see the vandalism. The monument looks to be permanently damaged.

The Mt. Willard Section House site is located along the old Maine Central Railroad in New Hampshire, next to the historic Willey Brook Trestle, in Crawford Notch. Since 1995 the Conway Scenic Railroad, which provides passenger excursion trains, has been using the track.

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