Posts Categorized: New Hampshire Waterfalls



Abstract Water Scenes, White Mountains

Water abstract of the moon reflecting off the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River along the Kancamagus Scenic Byway (Route 112) in Lincoln, New Hampshire.
Moon Light – East Branch of the Pemigewasset River, New Hampshire
 

Abstract Water Scenes, White Mountains – Most of the easily accessible roadside water scenes in the New Hampshire White Mountains have been photographed from every possible angle. And trying to find a unique perspective can be a tough task for any photographer.

Creating abstract scenes of your favorite brook, river, or waterfall is one way to obtain a unique perspective. Focus on the water bouncing off the rocks, and the lines and curves of the water flowing around the rocks. Each photograph you create will be a little different from the last one.

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Beaver Brook Cascades, Kinsman Notch

Beaver Brook Cascades on Beaver Brook in Kinsman Notch of the New Hampshire White Mountains on a rainy spring day. The Appalachian Tail passes by these cascades.
Beaver Brook Cascades – Kinsman Notch, New Hampshire
 

Beaver Brook Cascades, Kinsman Notch – When it comes to waterfalls in the New Hampshire White Mountains, the waterfalls in Kinsman Notch are often overlooked. I can only guess Kinsman Notch’s reputation of having rough terrain is what keeps most away from exploring this incredible Notch.

Kinsman Notch has a number of named and unmanned waterfalls, and one of the better known ones is Beaver Brook Cascades. These cascades are located on Beaver Brook, and the Appalachian Trail (Beaver Brook Trail) runs on the side of them. The earliest reference I have found to them is from the 1890s.

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Waterfalls on Cascade Brook, Franconia Notch

Cascade Brook in Lincoln, New Hampshire on a spring day. This brook is located along the Basin-Cascades Trail.
Cascade Brook – Basin-Cascades Trail, New Hampshire
 

Waterfalls on Cascade Brook, Franconia Notch Waterfall enthusiasts will love exploring Cascade Brook in Lincoln, New Hampshire. The Basin-Cascades Trail travels in the area of Cascade Brook. And for the most part, all of the cascades in this blog article are on the side of the trail. But they are not roadside, and one must hike up the Basin-Cascades Trail to reach them.

In the 1870s book, I Go A-fishing by William Cowper Prime, he describes Cascade Brook as being one of the finest brooks in America for scenery and small trout. In 1876, Mr. Prime and W.F. Bridge bought Moran Lake and the land around it. They renamed the lake “Lonesome Lake” and had a private cabin on it. And they spent time fishing on the brooks in the area. It is worth mentioning that in the early days Lonesome Lake was known as Tamarack Pond and Moran Lake.

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Fleming Flume, Elephant Head Brook

Fleming Flume on Elephant Head Brook in Carroll, New Hampshire during the summer months.
Fleming Flume (top section) – Carroll, New Hampshire
 

Fleming Flume, Elephant Head Brook – Over the summer, while doing some research, I came across a water feature in the 1907 Guide to the Paths and Camps in the White Mountains (first edition AMC Guidebook) referred to as Fleming Flume in Carroll, New Hampshire. The write-up also mentions a Fleming Fall. I finally had the chance to visit and photograph this little flume.

I have never heard of Fleming Flume or Fall and have found very limited mention of them in old books. From what I can find, they were only mentioned once in the AMC Guidebook, the 1907 edition. However, the flume does appear to be marked on the Mt Washington map in the 1940 and 1960 AMC Guides but disappears from the maps completely in the 1960s. The marks are hard to see on these maps, but they are there.

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Cascades on Cold Brook

Memorial Bridge along the Link Trail in Randolph, New Hampshire. Built in the 1920s this stone bridge is a dedication to all the early pathmakers.
Memorial Bridge (Cold Brook) – Randolph, New Hampshire
 

Cascades on Cold Brook, White Mountains – Cold Brook begins in King Ravine in the township of Low and Burbank's Grant and empties into the Moose River in Randolph. The 1908 map of the Northern Peaks of the Great Range and their Vicinity by Louis F. Cutter shows eleven marked cascades on Cold Brook. In the present day, the 9th edition of Randolph Paths states there are ten cascades on this brook.

Because of the minor discrepancy on the number of cascades, I based my work on the 1908 Louis Cutter map, which surprisingly is very accurate. I also referred to old A.M.C. White Mountain guidebooks. Out of the eleven cascades on Cold Brook, five of them are named. Two are known, Cold Brook Fall and Mossy Fall and the other three, Secunda Cascade, Tertia Cascade and Quarta Cascade have been forgotten over time.

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Waterfalls on Snyder Brook

View up Snyder Brook Valley toward Mount Madison and Mount Adams from the Inlook Trail in Randolph, New Hampshire during the summer months. This trail leads to Dome Rock.
Snyder Brook Valley From The Inlook Trail – Randolph, New Hampshire
 

Waterfalls on Snyder Brook, White Mountains – Located in the New Hampshire town of Randolph and the township of Low and Burbank's Grant Snyder Brook is a photographer’s and waterfall enthusiasts paradise. The lower portion of Snyder Brook is within the thirty-six acre Snyder Brook Scenic Area, which contains an impressive stand of old growth hemlock and red spruce.

In September of 1875 William G. Nowell, a 19th century trail builder, named Snyder Brook after Charles E. Lowe’s dog (ref: 1915 Appalachia Vol.13). Lowe was also a 19th century trail builder and mountain guide. Lowe and Nowell are credited for building Lowe’s Path in 1875-1876, one of the oldest trails in continuous use in the White Mountains. An 1896 map of Randolph indicates that Snyder Brook was once known as Salmacis Brook.

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