Posts Categorized: Hiking Trails



Davis Path, White Mountains

Crawford Notch State Park - Bemis Bridge, which crosses the Saco River along Davis Path in the White Mountain National Forest of New Hampshire.
Bemis Bridge – Crawford Notch, New Hampshire
 

Davis Path, White Mountains – Davis Path, completed in 1845 by Nathaniel Davis, son-in-law of Abel and Hannah Crawford, was the third and longest bridle path built to the summit of Mount Washington. The path was in use until about 1853-1854, and then it was neglected and became unusable. In 1910 it was reopened as a footpath. Today, the path is just over 14 miles long with most of it being within the Presidential Range – Dry River Wilderness.

The Davis Path begins in Crawford Notch, near the Notchland Inn, and crosses the Saco River by use of the 168 foot long Bemis Bridge (above). The Bemis Bridge, named after Samuel A. Bemis, is considered to be an asymmetrical cable stay bridge, and is also the start of the 165 mile long Cohos Trail.

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Boott Spur Trail, White Mountains

Clouds engulf Tuckerman Ravine from Boott Spur Trail during the summer months in the scenic landscape of the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA ..Notes: Boott Spur Trail is located on the eastern slopes of Mount Washington.
Tuckerman Ravine – Boott Spur Trail, New Hampshire
 

Boott Spur Trail, White Mountains – Boott Spur Trail begins off the Tuckerman Ravine Trail and ends at Davis Path, near the summit of Boott Spur Mountain. At 5500 feet, Boott Spur is named for Francis Boott, a botanist who took part in scientific expeditions to the Presidential Range during the early 1800s. The original route of the trail was opened by the Appalachian Mountain Club in 1900.

If I had to pick my top ten favorite trails in the White Mountains, Boott Spur Trail would be on the list. Much of the Boott Spur Trail is above treeline, and the views are breathtaking! First timers hiking this trail could suffer from view overload and will be taking many more breaks than expected to enjoy the mountain landscape.

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An Evolving Landscape, White Mountains

Trestle abutment at the Redrock Brook crossing along Franconia Brook Trail in the Pemigewasset Wilderness of New Hampshire. The Franconia Brook Trail follows the old railroad bed of the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad. This was a logging railroad that operated from 1893 - 1948. In 2011 high waters from Tropical Storm Irene caused most of the landscape stone abutment to collapse.
East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Redrock Brook, New Hampshire
 

An Evolving Landscape, White Mountains – It amazes me how much the landscape of the White Mountains changes over time. Many visitors to the White Mountains think of the area as being "stuck in time" because of its national forest designation. The reality is lots of change occurs naturally and by man. I thought it would be interesting to show scenes that no longer exist in the White Mountains. These scenes all disappeared over the last ten years.

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Mittersill-Cannon Trail, Cannon Mountain

Mittensill Mountain from the summit of Bald Mountain during the winter months in White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Mittersill Mountain – Franconia, New Hampshire
 

Mittersill-Cannon Trail, Cannon Mountain – I apologize for the politics, but it will help in understanding how this trail came to be. In 2012, Senate Bill 217 was introduced to the New Hampshire legislature. The main focus of the bill was the leasing of the Cannon Mountain Ski Area. It also proposed renaming Franconia Notch State Park to Franconia Notch Veterans' Memorial State Park, the building of a veterans memorial and the development of a hiking corridor on Mittersill Mountain.

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