Posts Categorized: Historic Buildings



Hexacuba Shelter, Kodak Trail

Appalachian Trail (AT) - The Hexacuba Shelter is a six-sided hexagonal shelter on the south side of Mount Cube, just off the Kodak Trail (AT) in Orford, New Hampshire.
Hexacuba Shelter – Kodak Trail (AT), New Hampshire
 

Hexacuba Shelter, Kodak Trail – Built in 1989 by the Dartmouth Outing Club (DOC), the Hexacuba Shelter is a six-sided hexagonal log shelter that sleeps 8-10. It's located at 1,980 feet on the south side of Mount Cube on a spur path off the Kodak Trail, a segment of the Appalachian Trail, in Orford, New Hampshire.

Three trails lead to Mount Cube: the Kodak Trail, the Mt. Cube Trail, and the Cross Rivendell Trail. The Kodak Trail is the most scenic of the three; the trail was named this because it travels over Eastman Ledges, and there are numerous "Kodak moments" along the trail. The older generation may understand this connection better than the younger generation.

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Resolution Shelter, Dry River Wilderness

Resolution Shelter was located off of Davis Path in the federally designated Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness in the New Hampshire White Mountains during a snow storm. The Resolution shelter was closed in 2009 because of safety issues, and it was torn down in December of 2011.
(2007) Resolution Shelter – Davis Path, New Hampshire
 

Resolution Shelter, Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness – The Resolution shelter site is located off of the 14-mile long Davis Path in the federally designated Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness in the New Hampshire White Mountains. Designated by the 1975 Eastern Wilderness Act, then expanded in 1984 by the New Hampshire Wilderness Act, this 29,000-acre wilderness area is governed under the National Wilderness Preservation System and the Wilderness Act. Both have strict guidelines when it comes to man-made structures in designated wilderness areas, and permanent improvements are not allowed within these areas.

Completed in 1845 by Nathaniel Davis, son-in-law of Abel and Hannah Crawford, Davis Path was the third and longest bridle path built to the summit of Mount Washington. The path was in use until 1853-1854, and then it was neglected and became unusable. In 1910, the Appalachian Mountain Club’s legendary Trail-builder Warren W. Hart (AMC’s councilor of improvements from 1908-1910), with the help of volunteers, re-opened it as a footpath. Two shelters, Camp Resolution and Camp Isolation, were built along Davis Path in 1912.

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Weeks State Park, New Hampshire

Weeks State Park - John Wingate Weeks Estate on the summit of Mt. Prospect in Lancaster, New Hampshire USA. The Mount Prospect Tower was built by John W. Weeks in 1912 and is still in operation today.
Weeks State Park – Lancaster, New Hampshire 
 

Weeks State Park, New Hampshire – Weeks State Park is a 420-acre, more or less, property on Mt. Prospect in Lancaster, New Hampshire. The main attraction of the park is the historical Weeks Estate on the summit. Built in 1912 for John Wingate Weeks (1860-1926), the main house is built of fieldstone and stucco.

Born in Lancaster on April 11, 1860, John Wingate Weeks was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts. He was a leading conservationist, congressman, senator, and secretary of war but is best known for the Weeks Act of 1911. The Weeks Act authorized the Federal Government to purchase private land in the eastern United States and maintain the land as national forests. He is the reason why we have the White Mountain National Forest.

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Russell-Colbath House, Passaconaway

The Russell-Colbath homestead along the Kancamagus Highway in Albany, New Hampshire. Located in the White Mountain National Forest, this historic homestead was built in the early 1830s, likely around 1832. When the Swift River Railroad (1906-1916) moved into the area, the Passaconaway settlement became the center of logging operations, and the railroad took over most of the settlement. It is the only original structure remaining from the Passaconaway settlement.
Russell-Colbath Homestead – Passaconaway, New Hampshire
 

Russell-Colbath House, Passaconaway – The Russell-Colbath House is a 19th-century historic house along the Kancamagus Highway in an area known as Passaconaway in Albany, New Hampshire. Albany was first chartered in 1766 under the name Burton and then renamed Albany in 1833. This old house holds the fascinating story of Ruth Priscilla Russell: the grand old lady of Passaconaway.

In the early 1800s, Austin George moved his family to Passaconaway. But tough times would force the George family to abandon the homestead and move to Bartlett in 1815. Their homestead was located just to the east of where the Russell-Colbath House now stands. What became of the George's dwellings is not completely clear. Because of its close proximity to the Russell dwelling and the George family connection, the Russell house is also referred to as the George House.

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Middle Sister Groundhouse, Albany

Middle Sister Groundhouse (fire tower) on Middle Sister Mountain in Albany, New Hampshire.
Middle Sister Tower – Albany, New Hampshire
 

Middle Sister Groundhouse, New Hampshire – In operation from 1927-1948, the Middle Sister Groundhouse is a fire lookout tower located on Middle Sister Mountain, along Middle Sister Trail, near Mount Chocorua, in Albany, New Hampshire. A groundhouse fire tower differs from a typical fire tower in that the lookout cabin is built on the ground, not on top of a tower.

Today, the foundation remains intact and some odds and ends linked to the groundhouse can be found at the site. And a Forest Service radio repeater is inside the foundation, which can be seen in the above image. You can see what this fire tower looked like when it was still in operation here.

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Greenleaf Hut, Mount Lafayette

Greenleaf Hut with Mount Lafayette in the background in the White Mountain National Forest of New Hampshire.
Greenleaf Hut – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Greenleaf Hut, Mount Lafayette – Some love' em and some hate' em! I have listened to some very heated debates over the years as to why the huts should or should not exist. Personally, I believe they offer travelers an excellent opportunity to explore the mountain region. And they do make make great photo subjects.

One of the more picturesque huts in the White Mountains hut system is the Greenleaf Hut on the side of Mount Lafayette. The hut opened in July 1930 (+/-) and was named in honor of Colonel Charles Henry Greenleaf, who ran the Profile House in Franconia Notch.

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Russell-Colbath Homestead, White Mountains

The Russell-Colbath Historic Homestead site located along the Kancamagus Highway (route 112), which is one of New England's scenic byways in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. This homestead was part of the Passaconaway settlement along the Swift River Logging Railroad. This was a logging railroad that operated from 1906 - 1916.
Russell-Colbath House – Albany, New Hampshire
 

Russell-Colbath Historic Homestead, Albany – The Russell Colbath house is a 19th century homestead located at the Passaconaway Historic Site along the Kancamagus Scenic Byway (Route 112) in Albany, New Hampshire. The homestead has walking trails, flower gardens, and an interesting graveyard.

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Fabyan Guard Station, White Mountains

The Fabyan Guard Station - Built in 1923 by Clifford Graham along the old Jefferson Turnpike (now Old Cherry Mountain Road) in the White Mountains, New Hampshire. It's the last remaining guard station in the White Mountain National Forest. The cabin was built using spruce logs from the surrounding area.
Fabyan Guard Station – White Mountains, New Hampshire.
 

Fabyan Guard Station, White Mountains – Built in 1923 by Clifford L. Graham, the Fabyan Guard Station is a 16 by 20 foot one room log cabin located along old Cherry Mountain Road (the old Jefferson Turnpike) in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Graham would eventually become Supervisor of the White Mountain National Forest.

Built of spruce logs from the surrounding area, the Fabyan Guard Station was the first administrative building built by Forest Service on White Mountain National Forest land. And today, it is the last remaining guard station in the White Mountain National Forest. According to Forest Service, in 1923, it cost $75.00 to build this cabin. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in May 2018.

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