Posts Categorized: Waterfalls



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Shell Cascade, Waterville Valley

Shell Cascade in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire during the spring months.This cascade is located on Hardy Brook.
Shell Cascade – Waterville Valley, New Hampshire
 

Shell Cascade, Waterville Valley – Located on Hardy Brook, a tributary of the Mad River, in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire is a small, but unique, cascade known as Shell Cascade. Because of its location, this cascade isn’t visited much. It is not in a remote area by any means, but no official trail leads to it, and during times of high water it can be difficult to reach Hardy Brook. And for these reasons, its considered to be a forgotten waterfall.

Visitors to Waterville Valley and the White Mountains region have been visiting Shell Cascade since the 1800s. Reference to Shell Cascade can be found in the 1892 book “The Waterville Valley: A History, Description, and Guide” By Arthur Lewis Goodrich, and on A.L Goodrich’s 1904 map of Waterville Valley.

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Georgiana Falls, New Hampshire

Harvard Brook in the New Hampshire White Mountains.
Pool along Harvard Brook – Lincoln, New Hampshire
 

Georgiana Falls, New Hampshire – Georgiana Falls is a series of breathtaking cascades on Harvard Brook in Lincoln, New Hampshire. These falls consist of two sections the Lower and Upper Georgiana Falls. There has been confusion on what the proper name of these falls is since the day they were discovered.

According to the “Guide Book to the Franconia Notch and the Pemigewasset Valley” By Frank Oliver Carpenter Georgiana Falls was discovered and named in 1858. Now for the name confusion, a group of Harvard students claimed to have found Upper Georgiana Falls and named them "Harvard Falls" prior to 1858. Carpenter’s book, states that the State Geologist ended the naming issue by naming the brook Harvard Brook and keeping the falls named Georgiana Falls. To this day, the names are still interchanged.

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Lost Waterfalls, White Mountains

Rollo Fall along the Moose River in Randolph, New Hampshire. Rollo Falls is one of the many lost waterfalls in the White Mountains worth visiting during the spring months when the river is running high.
Rollo Fall – Randolph, New Hampshire
 

Lost Waterfalls, White Mountains – I mentioned in last week’s blog article that I will be spending some time this year photographing forgotten waterfalls in the New Hampshire White Mountains. The reason I will be doing this is because many of these lost waterfalls were discovered and named back in the 19th century.

Much like an abandoned hill farm settlement, lost waterfalls are linked to the history of the White Mountains, and I need to include them in my White Mountains history and culture image collection. I usually find reference to lost waterfalls on old maps and in old history and guide books when researching abandoned settlements in the White Mountains.

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Ellen’s Falls, White Mountains

Ellens Falls are located on Hobbs Brook in Albany, New Hampshire.
Ellen's Falls (top section) – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Ellen's Falls, White Mountains – Ellen's Falls is a picturesque waterfall located on Hobbs Brook, about a mile upstream from its junction with the Kancamagus Highway in Albany, New Hampshire. And though I have read visiting these falls requires bushwhacking up the side of Hobbs Brook from the Kancamagus Highway, there is actually a gated Forest Road that can be used to reach the falls.

Hobbs Brook was probably named for one of Albany’s early settlers, Ruben Derban Hobbs who had a sawmill on the brook. But before Hobbs had his sawmill on the brook a man by the name of Ellen had a sawmill on the brook, and at the time locals referred to the brook as Ellen River. So it seems likely that Ellen’s Falls are named for him. At this point, I have found only one reference to Ellen.

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Dry Brook Waterfalls, Franconia Notch

Franconia Notch State Park - Stairs Falls during the spring months. This waterfall is located on Dry Brook in Lincoln, New Hampshire USA The Falling Waters Trail passes by it.
Stairs Falls – Franconia Notch, New Hampshire
 

Dry Brook Waterfalls, Franconia Notch With spring officially here, many are making plans to photograph waterfalls in the New Hampshire White Mountains. Today, I am going to introduce to you three waterfalls in Franconia Notch that may interest you. You may not recognize the name “Dry Brook”. But once you view the included images you will realize that two well known waterfalls in the White Mountains are on it.

These are not roadside waterfalls, and a photographer must hike up the Falling Waters Trail in Franconia Notch to reach them. Be forewarned, the terrain is very rugged, and only ones who are comfortable hiking in rough terrain should venture to these waterfalls. I hate making these comments but feel obligated to.

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Birch Island Brook, Lincoln New Hampshire

Birch Island Brook in Lincoln, New Hampshire USA near Ice Pond.
Birch Island Brook – Lincoln, New Hampshire
 

Birch Island Brook Falls, Lincoln Looking at the above image of Birch Island Brook, near Ice Pond, in Lincoln, New Hampshire you would never think there would be a small picturesque waterfall along it. But you know the old saying, looks can be deceiving.

Over the years, I have explored numerous brooks in the White Mountains and have realized that the many of them have interesting features that offer unique photography opportunities. Birch Island Brook is an excellent example of this. And today I want to share a few scenes from along the brook with you.

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