Posts Categorized: White Mountains History



The Forgotten White Mountains

Photos showing the forgotten White Mountains. Mount Washington from the summit of Mount Jefferson in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA  during the summer months.
Mount Washington – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

The Forgotten White Mountains – When most think about the New Hampshire White Mountains, the beauty of the region first comes to mind. The mighty Mount Washington rules the Presidential Range and keeps visitors of the area busy for hours. And during the winter months, ski areas offer an unforgettable view of the mountains blanketed in snow. The White Mountains are an outdoor lover’s paradise.

What I just described is tourism (camping, fishing, hiking, skiing, etc.) and it has been a big part of the White Mountains since the early days. And it has been said the historic August 1826 Willey landslide tragedy in Crawford Notch had a connection to the rise of tourism in America. Now in the 21st century, historical sites are of great interest to many, so today I am going to share a few photos of the forgotten White Mountains.

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East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Trestle 7

Foot bridge along the Lincoln Woods Trail which crosses Franconia Brook in Lincoln, New Hampshire. Hikers enter into the Pemigewasset Wilderness on the righthand side of this bridge. Old abutments from Trestle 7 of the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948) are used to support this foot bridge.
East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Trestle 7 (Franconia Brook )
 

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Trestle 7 – During the days of the East Branch & Lincoln (EB&L) Railroad, there were two trestles built at this crossing of Franconia Brook (above). And each trestle serviced different areas of today’s Pemigewasset Wilderness. The first trestle built serviced the Franconia Brook and Lincoln Brook Valleys. And the second trestle, built just below the first one, serviced the area surrounding the East and North Fork branches of the Pemigewasset River.

Trestle 7 is different than most trestles along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad because part of it is still in use today. No log trains pass over it anymore, but hikers use it on a regular basis.

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Thornton Gore Hill Farming Settlement

Remnants of an old hay rake at Thornton Gore in Thornton, New Hampshire.
Old Hay Rake – Thornton Gore, New Hampshire
 

Thornton Gore Hill Farming Settlement – Many consider Thornton Gore or the "Gore” to be the northern section of Thornton New Hampshire in the area of where Talford and Eastman Brook meet. However, I am currently reading Family Farm by Dick Bradley. And he refers to farms that were located just north of Johnson Brook as being part of the Gore. That area seems to be a little further south of the area today’s historians consider to be the Gore. But because Bradley lived in the Gore, I would have to say his information is accurate.

My work is based on an 1860 map of Thornton by H.F. Walling, a couple of historic resources, and days of field research. And I have focused mainly on the area surrounding Talford and Eastman Brook. This section of Thornton Gore had a bunch of farms, a few mills, a school, two cemeteries, and a church. The 1860 map I am using shows at least twenty-two dwellings in this area.

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Can You Identify These Artifacts

Can you identify these artifacts at Camp 10 along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948) in the Pemigewasset Wilderness of Franconia, New Hampshire.
Unidentified Artifact – East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948)
 

Can You Identify These Artifacts – When documenting historic sites in the New Hampshire White Mountains one of the biggest challenges I face is trying to identify some of the artifacts I photograph. In the big picture of my historical work, identifying what the artifact is and its purpose is important. And because of this, I have to do an extensive amount of research on some artifacts.

So I want to share with you some of the artifacts I have come across that I have yet to identify. I suspect a few of you out there can identify these artifacts. And I would be thrilled if you would share your knowledge with me. I plan on adding a few more artifacts I have yet to identify to this blog article in the future.

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Interesting Finds, White Mountains

Downes - Oliverian Brook Ski Trail in winter conditions. This trail follows the old Swift River Railroad bed, which was a logging railroad in operation from 1906-1916. This location is near the old St Johns Camp site in the White Brook drainage of Albany, New Hampshire.
Downes-Oliverian Brook Ski Trail – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Interesting Finds, White Mountains – My documentary work of historic sites takes me to many areas of the White Mountain National Forest. And I have to admit I have come across many things that I just can’t explain. And today I want to share a few of these interesting finds with you.

What intrigues me about the history of the White Mountains is researching the who, what, and when of an area. Unfortunately, I don’t have time to research every oddity I come across. And I have done little research on the included finds. Hopefully, this summer I can do some research on them.

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Historic Stone Structures, White Mountains

Historic Stone Structures, remnants of the old 1800s Summit House (foundation) on the summit of Mount Lafayette in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. The Appalachian Trail travels across this summit.
1800s Summit House Site – Mount Lafayette, New Hampshire
 

Historic Stone Structures, White Mountains – In my work documenting historic sites in the New Hampshire White Mountains I have photographed some interesting and unique stone structures. Visiting an abandoned 1800s homestead in the middle of the forest is a surreal experience. And today I want to share with you some of the interesting structures that remain in the forest.

I realize that everyone interprets the term “historic” differently. So for this blog article, a historic stone structure is anything over fifty years old. And these structures can be anything from old cellar holes to abandoned stone staircases that seem to lead to nowhere. Keep in mind, historic sites are protected and should not be disturbed.

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