Posts Tagged: artifacts



Can You Identify These Artifacts

Can you identify these artifacts at Camp 10 along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948) in the Pemigewasset Wilderness of Franconia, New Hampshire.
Unidentified Artifact – East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948)
 

Can You Identify These Artifacts – When documenting historic sites in the New Hampshire White Mountains one of the biggest challenges I face is trying to identify some of the artifacts I photograph. In the big picture of my historical work, identifying what the artifact is and its purpose is important. And because of this, I have to do an extensive amount of research on some artifacts.

So I want to share with you some of the artifacts I have come across that I have yet to identify. I suspect a few of you out there can identify these artifacts. And I would be thrilled if you would share your knowledge with me. I plan on adding a few more artifacts I have yet to identify to this blog article in the future.

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Don’t Remove Historic Artifacts

An abandoned cellar hole along an old road off Tunnel Brook Road in Benton, New Hampshire. This area was once known as Coventry-Benton, and based on an 1860 historical map of Grafton County this was the Charles B. Keyser homestead.
Heritage Sign – Benton, New Hampshire
 

Don't Remove Historic Artifacts – Here in New Hampshire, outdoor recreation is growing at an alarming rate. And there has been a surge of people exploring historical sites. As an environmental photographer, I am obligated to create awareness for the laws that protect our American heritage. For historic preservation to be successful, it is imperative that we all promote the protection of historic sites.

As you explore the abandoned farming communities, cellar holes, logging camps and other historic sites in the White Mountain National Forest, please keep in mind that the removal of historic or archaeological artifacts from federal lands without a permit is a violation of federal law. The destruction of artifacts and historic sites is also a crime. And please remember you can’t dig at historical sites. So metal detecting anywhere in the White Mountain National Forest where there could be artifacts is risky business. See the links at the end of this article for the laws that protect these special places.

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The Harp Switch Stand, New Hampshire

Beebe River Railroad - Harp Switch Stand along the old Beebe River Railroad in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire. This was an logging railroad, which operated from 1917-1942. The harp style switch stand was a manually operated railroad switch, which allowed trains to transfer to another section of track.
Beebe River Logging Railroad – Harp Switch Stand
 

The Harp Switch Stand, New Hampshire – Popular during the early days of railroading, the harp style switch stand was a manually operated railroad switch, which allowed trains to transfer to another section of track. This was accomplished by a railroad worker pushing or throwing the long bar (above). The included images are part of my environmental image collection that is focused on abandoned railroads in the White Mountains.

During the railroad era, harp switch stands were used on many New Hampshire railroads, including the logging railroads. Most of the harp switch stands along the logging railroads were removed back in the 1900s when the railroad track was picked up, but a handful of them were left deep in the backcountry of the White Mountains. Now considered historical artifacts these switches are a reminder of the land destruction that once took place in the White Mountains many years ago.

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Artifact Removal Is Illegal

An abandoned cellar hole along an old road off Tunnel Brook Road in Benton, New Hampshire. This area was once known as Coventry-Benton, and based on an 1860 historical map of Grafton County this was the Charles B. Keyser homestead.
Artifact Notice Sign – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Artifact Removal Is Illegal – As you explore the logging camps and historical sites of the White Mountains, New Hampshire, keep in mind that removal of historic or archaeological artifacts from federal lands without a permit is a violation of federal law. Destruction of artifacts is also a crime.

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Perspective, Pemigewasset Wilderness

The silhouette of hiker during a storm on Bondcliff Mountain in the Pemigewasset Wilderness of the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Stormy Weather, Bondcliff – White Mountains, NH
 

Perspective, Pemigewasset Wilderness – One of the challenges of a photographer focused on the New England environment is finding a different perspective of locations that have been photographed thousands of times. I approach this issue by focusing on entire areas, such as the Pemigewasset Wilderness and not just one popular location in the Pemigewasset Wilderness. Here is my perspective of the Pemi Wilderness.

The above shot of a hiker surrounded by storm clouds on New Hampshire's Bondcliff Mountain shows a side of the wilderness some do not see. Most photos from Bondcliff show the scenic landscape. And there is nothing wrong with this, but so many scenic shots exist that a stormy weather shot will make the viewer look twice. 

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