Posts Tagged: beebe river railroad



Beebe River Railroad, New Hampshire

Beebe River Railroad country - Reflection of autumn foliage in Kiah Pond in Sandwich, New Hampshire on a cloudy autumn day.
Kiah Pond – Beebe River Railroad Country
 

Beebe River Railroad, New Hampshire – In January 1917, the Publishers Paper Company sold the Beebe River land tract (around 22,000 acres) to the Parker-Young Company. And in March 1917, the New Hampshire legislature approved the incorporation of the Beebe River Railroad. Also in the same year, the Woodstock Lumber Company, an affiliate of Parker-Young, built the Beebe River sawmill and mill village in Campton.

From 1917-1924, the Woodstock Lumber Company and Parker-Young operated the mill and railroad. Including sidings and spur lines, the railroad was roughly 25-miles long. It began off the Boston & Maine Railroad in Campton, followed the Beebe River drainage up into Sandwich, and ended near logging Camp 12 at the base of Mount Whiteface in Waterville. Some of the spruce harvested by this railroad was used in the manufacturing of airplanes during World War 1.

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Harp Switch Stand, New Hampshire

Beebe River Railroad - Harp Switch Stand along the old Beebe River Railroad in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire. This was an logging railroad, which operated from 1917-1942. The harp style switch stand was a manually operated railroad switch, which allowed trains to transfer to another section of track.
Beebe River Logging Railroad – Harp Switch Stand
 

Harp Switch Stand, New Hampshire – Popular during the early days of railroading, the harp style switch stand was a manually operated railroad switch, which allowed trains to transfer to another section of track. This was accomplished by a railroad worker pushing or throwing the long bar (above). The included images are part of my environmental image collection that is focused on abandoned railroads.

During the railroad era, harp switch stands were used on many New Hampshire railroads, including the logging railroads. Most of the harp switch stands along the logging railroads were removed back in the 1900s when the railroad track was picked up, but a handful of them were left deep in the backcountry of the White Mountains. Now considered historical artifacts these switches are a reminder of the land destruction that once took place in the White Mountains many years ago.

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Slideshow of Weeks Act Centennial


Weeks Act Centennial – Images by ScenicNH.com Photography

Celebrating 100 years of Wilderness Protection. The above images are why I feel the Weeks Act is so important. Without it who knows what condition the White Mountains of New Hampshire would be in today.

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