Posts Tagged: cellar hole



Thornton Gore Hill Farming Settlement

Remnants of an old hay rake at Thornton Gore in Thornton, New Hampshire.
Old Hay Rake – Thornton Gore, New Hampshire
 

Thornton Gore Hill Farming Settlement – Many consider Thornton Gore or the "Gore” to be the northern section of Thornton New Hampshire in the area of where Talford and Eastman Brook meet. However, I am currently reading Family Farm by Dick Bradley. And he refers to farms that were located just north of Johnson Brook as being part of the Gore. That area seems to be a little further south of the area today’s historians consider to be the Gore. But because Bradley lived in the Gore, I would have to say his information is accurate.

My work is based on an 1860 map of Thornton by H.F. Walling, a couple of historic resources, and days of field research. And I have focused mainly on the area surrounding Talford and Eastman Brook. This section of Thornton Gore had a bunch of farms, a few mills, a school, two cemeteries, and a church. The 1860 map I am using shows at least twenty-two dwellings in this area.

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Historic Stone Structures, White Mountains

Historic Stone Structures, remnants of the old 1800s Summit House (foundation) on the summit of Mount Lafayette in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. The Appalachian Trail travels across this summit.
1800s Summit House Site – Mount Lafayette, New Hampshire
 

Historic Stone Structures, White Mountains – In my work documenting historic sites in the New Hampshire White Mountains I have photographed some interesting and unique stone structures. Visiting an abandoned 1800s homestead in the middle of the forest is a surreal experience. And today I want to share with you some of the interesting structures that remain in the forest.

I realize that everyone interprets the term “historic” differently. So for this blog article, a historic stone structure is anything over fifty years old. And these structures can be anything from old cellar holes to abandoned stone staircases that seem to lead to nowhere. Keep in mind, historic sites are protected and should not be disturbed.

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