Posts Tagged: conservation



Happy Earth Day 2022, New Hampshire

Happy Earth Day; Scarface Brook in Bethlehem, New Hampshire during the autumn months. This brook is a tributary of the South Branch of the Gale River
Scarface Brook – Bethlehem, New Hampshire
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2022 – Happy Earth Day from the New Hampshire White Mountains! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here. In the 21st-century, it is essential that we understand the impact we have on the environment. Education and proper training can help control the problem.

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Cog Railway Hotel Proposal

Cog Railway, Mount Washington on the summit of Mount Washington in the White Mountains, New Hampshire. Completed in 1869, this three mile railroad leads to the summit of Mount Washington.
Mount Washington Cog Railway in the Alpine Zone, New Hampshire
 

Cog Railway Hotel Proposal, Mount Washington – The owner of the Mount Washington Cog Railway is again proposing a restaurant and hotel accommodations on New Hampshire's Mount Washington. However, this project is a little different than the 35-room hotel proposal he made a few years ago. The Cog Railway owns a 99-foot-wide strip of land that straddles the railroad from the Cog Railway Station to the summit of Mount Washington. These accommodations would be built within this strip of land, below the summit.

In the new proposal, 18 rail cars would be placed at 5,800 feet at a station from mid-May through mid-October. Some of the rail cars would be dining cars, and nine of them will be sleeper cars that can accommodate up to 70 guests. And because the station isn’t on the actual summit of Mount Washington (6,288 feet), the Cog Railway will have a daily train dedicated to transporting passengers back and forth from the new station to the summit. If approved, this estimated $14 million dollar project could take up to 7 years to complete.

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Happy Earth Day 2021, New Hampshire

Earth Day, a small cascade on a tributary of Lost River in Kinsman Notch in North Woodstock, New Hampshire during the spring months.
Tributary of Lost River – Kinsman Notch, New Hampshire
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2021 – Happy Earth Day from the New Hampshire White Mountains! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here. In the 21st-century, it is essential that we understand the impact we have on the environment. Education and proper training can help control the problem.

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Weeks State Park, New Hampshire

Weeks State Park - John Wingate Weeks Estate on the summit of Mt. Prospect in Lancaster, New Hampshire USA. The Mount Prospect Tower was built by John W. Weeks in 1912 and is still in operation today.
Weeks State Park – Lancaster, New Hampshire 
 

Weeks State Park, New Hampshire – Weeks State Park is a 420-acre, more or less, property on Mt. Prospect in Lancaster, New Hampshire. The main attraction of the park is the historical Weeks Estate on the summit. Built in 1912 for John Wingate Weeks (1860-1926), the main house is built of fieldstone and stucco.

Born in Lancaster on April 11, 1860, John Wingate Weeks was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts. He was a leading conservationist, congressman, senator, and secretary of war but is best known for the Weeks Act of 1911. The Weeks Act authorized the Federal Government to purchase private land in the eastern United States and maintain the land as national forests. He is the reason why we have the White Mountain National Forest.

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2020 Human Impact, White Mountains

2020 human impact, mask hanging from a tree along the Georgiana Falls Path in Lincoln, New Hampshire during the summer of 2020 (COVID-19 pandemic).
COVID-19 Pandemic – White Mountains, New Hampshire (Sept. 2020)
 

2020 Human Impact, White Mountains – During these strange times, like many of you, I have been trying to stay safe and worrying about family and friends. I also have watched the New Hampshire White Mountains get trashed over the last few months. While human impact (overuse) is not a new problem here in the White Mountains, it has gotten much worse during the Coronavirus pandemic.

Being a native of New Hampshire, I hate seeing the White Mountains being treated so poorly. I have never seen such a lack of respect for nature. However, overuse has been a problem throughout the history of the White Mountains. And with the surge in outdoor recreation in the 21st-century, this was bound to happen again. And even in today’s conservation minded-society, there is still no easy solution to the problem.

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Happy Earth Day 2020, New Hampshire

Agassiz Basin, on Mossilauke Brook, in North Woodstock, New Hampshire on a foggy autumn day. Agassiz Basin is named for Swiss naturalist, Louis Agassiz (1807-1873), who visited the region while doing research in the 1800s.
Agassiz Basin – North Woodstock, New Hampshire
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2020 – Happy Earth Day from the New Hampshire White Mountains! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment. This year marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here. In the 21st-century, it is essential that we understand the impact we have on the environment. Education and proper training can help control the problem.

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Happy Earth Day 2019, New Hampshire

Happy Earth Day! Cascade on Spur Brook, at Coldspur Ledges, in Randolph, New Hampshire during the summer months. This small cascade is located at the confluence of Cold Brook and Spur Brook.
Coldspur Ledges – Randolph, New Hampshire
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2019 – Happy Earth Day from the New Hampshire White Mountains! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here. In the 21st-century, tourism (biking, hiking, fishing, etc.) has exploded in the White Mountains, and areas are being overused. And because of this, it is essential that we understand the impact we have on the environment. Education and proper training can help control the problem.

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Mount Tecumseh, 4000 Footers Hiking List

The village of Waterville Valley, New Hampshire during the autumn months. Mt Tecumseh is in the background. This mountain is named for the Shawnee chief, Tecumseh  (c.1768–1813).
Mount Tecumseh (2012) – Waterville Valley, New Hampshire
 

Mount Tecumseh, 4000 Footers Hiking List – On the same day that I publicized my Owl’s Head, Conserving Wilderness article, the Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC) posted an article about some of the mountains on the White Mountain 4000 footers hiking list may not be over 4,000 feet. Being over 4,000 feet is one of the criteria for a mountain to be on the list. While our articles focus on different mountains on the hiking list, they both suggest that the time is coming for the AMC 4000 footer club to reevaluate the hiking list.

Lidar, a laser based technology, is currently being used to remap the White Mountains. This technology is very accurate at determining mountain elevations. And it was made public that the Lidar data is indicating that at least one mountain, Mount Tecumseh, is under the 4,000 foot criteria. According to the data Tecumseh is 3,995 feet (see footnote for actual new height), not 4,003 feet. Will the Lidar data reveal that Mount Isolation (4,004 feet) and Mount Waumbek (4,006 feet) are also below the 4,000 foot criteria?

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