Posts Tagged: crawford’s purchase



June History, White Mountains

June history, Frankenstein Trestle along the old Maine Central Railroad in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Frankenstein Trestle – Original Trestle Completed June 1875
 

June History, White Mountains – Many photographers love visiting the New Hampshire White Mountains during June. This time of year, the subject matter is endless, and photographers can shoot from sunrise to sunset. And with Covid restrictions being eased, the region will be filled with busy photographers this month. If there is one drawback, it’s the bugs. They can be awful this time of year!

Throughout the history of the White Mountains, there is not one significant historical event that dominates the month of June. However, many smaller events happened. A railroad trestle was completed, a turnpike opened for business, thousands of acres were granted, and a one of a kind railroad was incorporated. Included here are a few interesting June events.

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Ammonoosuc River Waterfalls

Reflection of Mount Washington in Lakes of the Clouds along the Appalachian Trail in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Lakes of the Clouds – Mount Washington, New Hampshire
 

Ammonoosuc River Waterfalls, White Mountains – Beginning at Lakes of the Clouds on Mount Washington in Sargent’s Purchase, this roughly 55 mile long river travels through a number of towns before draining into the Connecticut River at Woodsville in the town of Haverhill. Ammonoosuc is an Abenaki word meaning “fish place” or “small narrowing fishing place". The Abenaki fished and camped along the river.

Protected under the New Hampshire Rivers Management and Protection Program, the Ammonoosuc River is managed in accordance with RSA 483. The portion of the Ammonoosuc River from Lower Falls in Carroll to the Connecticut River in Woodsville was added to the program in 2007. And the portion from Lakes of the Clouds to Lower Falls, known as the Upper Reach watershed, was added to the program in 2009. This work focuses mainly on the Upper Reach section of the river.

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