Posts Tagged: east branch & lincoln project



East Branch & Lincoln, Abandoned Spur Lines

Spur lines, Pemigewasset Wilderness. Location of a spur line off the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad at North Fork Junction in Lincoln, New Hampshire. The railroad tracks traveled up this rocky brook bed.
North Fork Junction Spur Line – East Branch & Lincoln Railroad
 

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Abandoned Spur Lines – The East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948) was a logging railroad in the New Hampshire White Mountains. With the current documentation, we can get a good idea of the layout of the railroad and firsthand accounts from people who worked the woods. And though based on educated guesses, we can also determine the locations of the abandoned logging camps along the railroad. But the reality is there is so much unknown about this railroad.

One of the great unknowns is how many spur lines existed along the East Branch & Lincoln. A spur line is a short branch of railroad track that leads off the main line. Along the East Branch & Lincoln, spur lines lead to landings where railroad log cars were loaded. And shorter spur lines (some refer to these as sidings) were used to store railroad log cars. Today, I am going to share with you some of the known spur lines and sidings.

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February 1959 Plane Crash, Pemi Wilderness

Memorial for Dr. Ralph E. Miller and Dr. Robert E. Quinn in the Thoreau Falls valley of the Pemigewasset Wilderness in Lincoln, New Hampshire. The doctors successfully crash landed their plane on February 21, 1959 in this location along the abandoned railroad bed of the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad. They survived for four days before dying of exposure.
Abandoned Section of the Thoreau Falls Trail – Pemigewasset Wilderness, New Hampshire
 

February 1959 Plane Crash, Pemigewasset Wilderness – On Saturday, February 21, 1959 a Piper Comanche airplane took off from the Berlin, New Hampshire Airport, around 3:30 p.m., destined for Lebanon, New Hampshire Airport. The pilot was Dr. Ralph E. Miller and his passenger was Dr. Robert E. Quinn. Both were doctors affiliated with Dartmouth Medical School.

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East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Lincoln

Pemigewasset Wilderness - Abandoned rail-line deep in the Pemigewasset Wilderness in Lincoln, New Hampshire. This spur line was located along the East Branch & Lincoln logging railroad, which operated from 1893-1948.
East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Abandoned Railroad Track
 

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – The East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, built by timber baron James E. Henry, was a logging railroad that operated from 1893-1948 in the New Hampshire towns of Lincoln and Franconia. Much of the railroad was in the area we know today as the Pemigewasset Wilderness. If you venture into the Pemi, from the Lincoln Woods Trail, you will be walking the railroad bed of Henry’s railroad.

During its existence, the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad was sold to the Parker Young Company and then to the Marcalus Manufacturing Company. The railroad was considered the "elite logging railroad" during the 19th & 20th century White Mountains logging era. And towards the end of its lifespan truck logging played a role in the logging operations.

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East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Trestle 16

Black Brook Trestle which crossed Black Brook. This trestle is located along the old East Branch & Lincoln Logging Railroad and operated from 1893-1948. The Wilderness Trail travels next to this trestle
East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Trestle 16
 

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Trestle No. 16 – Trestle 16 is located along the abandoned East Branch & Lincoln Railroad in the Pemigewasset Wilderness of New Hampshire. It is also referred to as Black Brook Trestle and the J.E. Henry Trestle. Trestle 16 is one of the few remaining trestle artifacts that remind us of what took place in the area we know today as the Pemigewasset Wilderness.

From 1893 to 1948 the Pemigewasset Wilderness was the scene of massive logging operations by timber baron J.E. Henry and in later years the Parker Young Company. Both operated log trains over this trestle.

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James E. Henry, White Mountains History

Grave site of James E. Henry (1831-1912) at Glenwood Cemetery in Littleton, New Hampshire USA. J.E. Henry was a 19th and 20th-century timber baron known for his East Branch & Lincoln Railroad in Lincoln, New Hampshire. Historians suggest he was born in 1831 and died on April 19, 1912.
J.E. Henry Burial Site (1831 – 1912) – Glenwood Cemetery, Littleton
 

James Everell Henry (1831 – April 18, 1912) – James E. Henry died at his home on April 18, 1912. He was a 19th and 20th-century timber baron best known for his logging practices and building of the Zealand Valley and East Branch & Lincoln Railroads in the New Hampshire White Mountains. He forever changed the landscape of the White Mountains with his "cut it all" logging practices.

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East Branch & Lincoln, Corduroyed Roads

Pemigewasset Wilderness - Remnants of a sled road off of the old East Branch & Lincoln Railroad in the Shoal Pond Valley of Lincoln, New Hampshire. Swamp areas along sled roads were corduroyed with small trees laid crossways. The East Branch & Lincoln was a logging railroad, which operated from 1893-1948.
Shoal Pond Region of the Pemi Wilderness – Corduroyed Section
 

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Corduroyed Roads – Have you ever come across something in the forest you know was man made, but have no idea what it is? Here is something for you to look for the next time you are exploring one of the abandoned logging railroads in New England.

Along an abandoned sled road deep in the Shoal Pond region of New Hampshire's Pemigewasset Wilderness remains an interesting artifact (above) from the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad era. Though very rotten and almost unrecognizable, it is a unique look at how 20th-century logging railroads dealt with building sled roads.

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East Branch & Lincoln, Trestle 7

Foot bridge along the Lincoln Woods Trail which crosses Franconia Brook. Hikers enter into the Pemigewasset Wilderness on the right hand side of this bridge. Old abutments from Trestle 7 which was once part of the East Branch & Lincoln Logging Railroad are used to support the foot bridge. Located in Lincoln, New Hampshire.
East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Trestle 7 (Franconia Brook )
 

East Branch & Lincoln, Trestle 7 – As I start photographing abandoned railroads again, one of my objectives is to show how 20th century railroads have been used in the current trail system. Many of the railroads have disappeared into the forest never to be seen again, but others have become intricate parts of the White Mountain trail system. This is evident at the Franconia Brook crossing along the Lincoln Woods Trail in Lincoln, New Hampshire.

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East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Artifact

Pemigewasset Wilderness - Artifacts (horseshoe) in wetlands area near Camp 9 which was a logging camp along the East Branch & Lincoln Logging Railroad in Lincoln, New Hampshire USA. The East Branch & Lincoln Railroad was a logging railroad that operated from 1893-1948. This area was logged during the early stages of the railroad era suggesting this artifact has been in the water for many years.
East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Artifact 
 

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Always look in the water, because you never know what you will find! The above photo is of an old horseshoe (artifact) in a wetlands area of the Pemigewasset Wilderness near Camp 9. Camp 9 was a rail-side logging camp located along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (EB&L) in Lincoln, New Hampshire USA.

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