Posts Tagged: east branch & lincoln railroad



East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Trestle 7

Foot bridge along the Lincoln Woods Trail which crosses Franconia Brook in Lincoln, New Hampshire. Hikers enter into the Pemigewasset Wilderness on the righthand side of this bridge. Old abutments from Trestle 7 of the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948) are used to support this foot bridge.
East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Trestle 7 (Franconia Brook )
 

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Trestle 7 – During the days of the East Branch & Lincoln (EB&L) Railroad, there were two trestles built at this crossing of Franconia Brook (above). And each trestle serviced different areas of today’s Pemigewasset Wilderness. The first trestle built serviced the Franconia Brook and Lincoln Brook Valleys. And the second trestle, built just below the first one, serviced the area surrounding the East and North Fork branches of the Pemigewasset River.

Trestle 7 is different than most trestles along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad because part of it is still in use today. No log trains pass over it anymore, but hikers use it on a regular basis.

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Can You Identify These Artifacts

Can you identify these artifacts at Camp 10 along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948) in the Pemigewasset Wilderness of Franconia, New Hampshire.
Unidentified Artifact – East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948)
 

Can You Identify These Artifacts – When documenting historic sites in the New Hampshire White Mountains one of the biggest challenges I face is trying to identify some of the artifacts I photograph. In the big picture of my historical work, identifying what the artifact is and its purpose is important. And because of this, I have to do an extensive amount of research on some artifacts.

So I want to share with you some of the artifacts I have come across that I have yet to identify. I suspect a few of you out there can identify these artifacts. And I would be thrilled if you would share your knowledge with me. I plan on adding a few more artifacts I have yet to identify to this blog article in the future.

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Interesting Finds, White Mountains

Downes - Oliverian Brook Ski Trail in winter conditions. This trail follows the old Swift River Railroad bed, which was a logging railroad in operation from 1906-1916. This location is near the old St Johns Camp site in the White Brook drainage of Albany, New Hampshire.
Downes-Oliverian Brook Ski Trail – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Interesting Finds, White Mountains – My documentary work of historic sites takes me to many areas of the White Mountain National Forest. And I have to admit I have come across many things that I just can’t explain. And today I want to share a few of these interesting finds with you.

What intrigues me about the history of the White Mountains is researching the who, what, and when of an area. Unfortunately, I don’t have time to research every oddity I come across. And I have done little research on the included finds. Hopefully, this summer I can do some research on them.

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Don’t Remove Historic Artifacts

An abandoned cellar hole along an old road off Tunnel Brook Road in Benton, New Hampshire. This area was once known as Coventry-Benton, and based on an 1860 historical map of Grafton County this was the Charles B. Keyser homestead.
Heritage Sign – Benton, New Hampshire
 

Don't Remove Historic Artifacts – Here in New Hampshire, outdoor recreation is growing at an alarming rate. And there has been a surge of people exploring historical sites. As an environmental photographer, I am obligated to create awareness for the laws that protect our American heritage. For historic preservation to be successful, it is imperative that we all promote the protection of historic sites.

As you explore the abandoned farming communities, cellar holes, logging camps and other historic sites in the White Mountain National Forest, please keep in mind that the removal of historic or archaeological artifacts from federal lands without a permit is a violation of federal law. The destruction of artifacts and historic sites is also a crime. And please remember you can’t dig at historical sites. So metal detecting anywhere in the White Mountain National Forest where there could be artifacts is risky business. See the links at the end of this article for the laws that protect these special places.

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Trails of the Pemigewasset Wilderness

Franconia Brook Trail during the summer months. This trail follows the railroad bed of the old East Branch & Lincoln Railroad that traveled through this area. The EB&L was a logging railroad in the state of New Hampshire that was owned by James E. Henry.
Franconia Brook Trail (old railroad bed) – Pemi Wilderness, New Hampshire
 

Trails of the Pemigewasset Wilderness – At 45,000-acres, the Pemigewasset Wilderness (the Pemi) is one of six designated wilderness areas in the White Mountain National Forest. Wilderness areas are governed under the National Wilderness Preservation System and the Wilderness Act of 1964. And they are managed much differently than other parts of the National Forest.

Permanent improvements are not allowed, trail work is minimal, and there are strict guidelines when it comes to man-made structures in wilderness areas. Bicycles are not allowed in these areas, and trail work can only be done with non-motorized hand tools. Preserving the natural character of a wilderness area is the objective.

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East Branch & Lincoln, Forgotten Trestles

Trestles, remnants of a timber trestle that once spanned the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River in the area of Camp 18 along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948) in the Pemigewasset Wilderness of Lincoln, New Hampshire.
Trestle 18 – East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, New Hampshire
 

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Forgotten Trestles – In October 2015,  I wrote about the forgotten spur lines along the East Branch & Lincoln (EB&L) Railroad in New Hampshire. And today I am going to continue with this theme and focus on the timber trestles of the railroad.

The EB&L Railroad, built by J.E. Henry, was in operation from 1893-1948 with much of the railroad being in the area we know today as the Pemigewasset Wilderness. It was considered the elite logging railroad of its time. And the logging practices of this era is one of the reasons why the Wilderness Act is in place today.

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