Posts Tagged: forgotten history



Pemigewasset Wilderness, Random History

One of the stone abutments that support the abandoned Trestle No. 16 in the Pemigewasset Wilderness of New Hampshire.
Trestle No. 16 (2010), East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Pemigewasset Wilderness
 

Pemigewasset Wilderness, Random History – This designated wilderness is the result of one the greatest conservation laws ever passed; the Wilderness Act, which has protected over 109 million acres across the United States. While the history of New Hampshire's Pemigewasset Wilderness mostly revolves around the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, the railroad is not the only interesting piece of history surrounding this unique region of the White Mountains. This blog article features random tidbits of history about this one of a kind designated wilderness area.

One of the grandest pieces of New Hampshire logging railroad history, trestle No. 16 (above) collapsed in late May or early June 2018. Spanning Black Brook, it stood for over 100 years and became a favorite attraction among outdoor enthusiasts. Logging railroads were built to be temporary and its remarkable that this trestle stood for as long as it did. The last log train rolled over this trestle most likely in the summer or fall of 1946.

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Random History, White Mountains

Mount Monroe with Mount Washington in the background from the Appalachian Trail (Crawford Path) in Sargent's Purchase, New Hampshire during the last days of summer.
Darby Field, First Ascent – Mount Washington, New Hampshire
 

Random History, White Mountains – My work as a photographer has allowed me to explore and document many historical sites in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. And it really has changed the way I view the White Mountains. It amazes me that Darby Field made the first ascent of Mount Washington in 1642. And farming settlements and grand resorts were scattered throughout the region in the 1800s.

With outdoor recreation at an all-time high in the White Mountains, it is important to create awareness for the region's history. The more history we outdoor enthusiasts know about an area, the more attached we become to the area. And because of this connection, it inspires us to get involved with conservation. And yes, there will always be some that feel the history is insignificant, but that is for another day. Today’s blog article consists of a few random tidbits of history.

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Personal Work, Help Identify This Artifact

Artifact from the Gordon Pond Railroad in Kinsman Notch of the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. This was a logging railroad in operation from 1905-1916.
Artifact – Gordon Pond Railroad, New Hampshire
 

Personal Work, Identify This Artifact – I have been working on one of my long term personal projects for the last few weeks. This project is focused on the abandoned railroads in the New Hampshire White Mountains. For the most part, I keep this work separated from my everyday photography business because there is not much interest for this type of imagery (or market in the photography world) outside of New England.

I have been documenting, with a camera, the abandoned logging railroads for over a decade and have been exploring them for as long as I can remember. This project has taken me into parts of the White Mountains I would have never visited or photographed under normal circumstances. And if you are wondering my favorite abandoned railroad is the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad in Lincoln, but that is for another day.

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Boston & Maine, Mt Washington Branch

Railroad trestle along the old Boston and Maine Railroad near Fabyans in Carroll, New Hampshire.
Boston & Maine Railroad, New Hampshire – Fabyans Trestle
 

Boston & Maine Railroad, Mt Washington Branch – Built by the Boston, Concord & Montreal Railroad, the thirteen and a half mile long Mt Washington Branch was completed in 1874. This branch began at Wing Road in Bethlehem, New Hampshire and ended just east of Fabayns in Bretton Woods. The railroad would be leased to the Boston & Maine Railroad in 1895.

Because there was a growing interest in the Mount Washington Cog Railway, an extension was added to this branch in 1876. And this extension is the focus of this blog article. The Boston, Concord & Montreal Railroad completed the roughly six and a half mile long extension from Fabyans to the base of the Cog Railway in 1876. The last passenger trains to the Base Station ran on August 31, 1931.

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