Posts Tagged: hike



Hexacuba Shelter, Kodak Trail

Appalachian Trail (AT) - The Hexacuba Shelter is a six-sided hexagonal shelter on the south side of Mount Cube, just off the Kodak Trail (AT) in Orford, New Hampshire.
Hexacuba Shelter – Kodak Trail (AT), New Hampshire
 

Hexacuba Shelter, Kodak Trail – Built in 1989 by the Dartmouth Outing Club (DOC), the Hexacuba Shelter is a six-sided hexagonal log shelter that sleeps 8-10. It's located at 1,980 feet on the south side of Mount Cube on a spur path off the Kodak Trail, a segment of the Appalachian Trail, in Orford, New Hampshire.

Three trails lead to Mount Cube: the Kodak Trail, the Mt. Cube Trail, and the Cross Rivendell Trail. The Kodak Trail is the most scenic of the three; the trail was named this because it travels over Eastman Ledges, and there are numerous "Kodak moments" along the trail. The older generation may understand this connection better than the younger generation.

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Resolution Shelter, Dry River Wilderness

Resolution Shelter was located off of Davis Path in the federally designated Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness in the New Hampshire White Mountains during a snow storm. The Resolution shelter was closed in 2009 because of safety issues, and it was torn down in December of 2011.
(2007) Resolution Shelter – Davis Path, New Hampshire
 

Resolution Shelter, Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness – The Resolution shelter site is located off of the 14-mile long Davis Path in the federally designated Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness in the New Hampshire White Mountains. Designated by the 1975 Eastern Wilderness Act, then expanded in 1984 by the New Hampshire Wilderness Act, this 29,000-acre wilderness area is governed under the National Wilderness Preservation System and the Wilderness Act. Both have strict guidelines when it comes to man-made structures in designated wilderness areas, and permanent improvements are not allowed within these areas.

Completed in 1845 by Nathaniel Davis, son-in-law of Abel and Hannah Crawford, Davis Path was the third and longest bridle path built to the summit of Mount Washington. The path was in use until 1853-1854, and then it was neglected and became unusable. In 1910, the Appalachian Mountain Club’s legendary Trail-builder Warren W. Hart (AMC’s councilor of improvements from 1908-1910), with the help of volunteers, re-opened it as a footpath. Two shelters, Camp Resolution and Camp Isolation, were built along Davis Path in 1912.

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2021 Year in Review, White Mountains

2021, the Flume Covered Bridge in Franconia Notch, New Hampshire covered in snow on an autumn morning. This picturesque bridge crosses the Pemigewasset River.
Flume Covered Bridge – Flume Gorge, New Hampshire
 

2021 Year in Review, White Mountains – As the year comes to an end, I don't have much to say. And like many of you, I am looking forward to the start of the new year. What a year it has been! This year I am going to keep it short and just make a handful of comments about my favorite images of 2021.

Over the last few years, all we have heard about is how overrun the White Mountains are now. And I agree it is an issue that needs to be addressed. Our trailheads are overflowing into the streets, mountains summits are overcrowded with peakbaggers looking for the perfect selfie, and campgrounds are beyond capacity. But because of the "off the beaten path" locations I have been documenting over the last two years, I have seen almost no one in the White Mountains. Serenity still can be found in the White Mountains.

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February History, White Mountains

White Mountains, February history; a winter hiker ascending the Air Line Trail in extreme weather conditions in the White Mountains, New Hampshire
Air Line Trail – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

February History, White Mountains – The history of the New Hampshire White Mountains can be looked at from many different perspectives. One of the more interesting ways to look at it is from a monthly viewpoint.

From a historical point of view, February is a deadly month in the White Mountains. Throughout the years, avalanches, climbing falls, hypothermia, and skiing accidents have taken a number of lives during this month. Most of these incidents have been well documented, so below are a few not so well known events that happened during the month of February.

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2020 Human Impact, White Mountains

2020 human impact, mask hanging from a tree along the Georgiana Falls Path in Lincoln, New Hampshire during the summer of 2020 (COVID-19 pandemic).
COVID-19 Pandemic – White Mountains, New Hampshire (Sept. 2020)
 

2020 Human Impact, White Mountains – During these strange times, like many of you, I have been trying to stay safe and worrying about family and friends. I also have watched the New Hampshire White Mountains get trashed over the last few months. While human impact (overuse) is not a new problem here in the White Mountains, it has gotten much worse during the Coronavirus pandemic.

Being a native of New Hampshire, I hate seeing the White Mountains being treated so poorly. I have never seen such a lack of respect for nature. However, overuse has been a problem throughout the history of the White Mountains. And with the surge in outdoor recreation in the 21st-century, this was bound to happen again. And even in today’s conservation minded-society, there is still no easy solution to the problem.

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East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Utility Poles

Artifact (utility pole) in the area of Camp 17 along the old East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948 in Lincoln, New Hampshire.
East Branch & Lincoln RR – Standing Utility Pole, Camp 17 Area
 

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Utility Poles – Telephone wires were strung from utility poles along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948) to the numerous logging camps. In some areas along the railroad, side mounted wooden telephone peg holder pins nailed directly to trees were used in place of utility poles. Today, these utility poles are considered artifacts of the White Mountains logging era.

While this blog article focuses only on the abandoned East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, other logging railroads in the White Mountains used the same approach described above. And remnants of utility poles can still be found along some of the other railroads. However, as nature slowly reclaims the East Branch & Lincoln territory, standing utility poles are becoming a rarity.

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2019 Year in Review, White Mountains

Black Mountain from along the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River, near the Loon Mtn. bridge, in Lincoln, New Hampshire at sunrise on an autumn day.
Black Mountain at Sunrise – Lincoln, New Hampshire
 

2019 Year in Review, White Mountains – Another year is coming to an end! For the past few years, I have been posting my "ten favorite images of the year" at the end of the year. But I drifted away from this format last year, and I am going to do it again this year. While we all love viewing imagery of the White Mountains, the “my top 10 favorite photos of the year" blog articles have become to repetitive for me. So its time for a change.

This year I found myself thinking about how the White Mountains have changed my life. Like many of you, I am drawn to these mountains, and at this point in my life, I can’t imagine living anywhere else. But I realized that it wasn't just the mountains, photography has been a huge influence in my life. Photography has made me care about conservation, historic preservation, and the environment. The camera has taught me more about life than I think I will ever realize.

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Lincoln Woods Trail, White Mountains

East Branch of the Pemigewasset River, near the Lincoln Woods Trailhead Suspension footbridge, in Lincoln, New Hampshire during the autumn months.
Suspension Bridge – Lincoln Woods Trailhead, White Mountains
 

Lincoln Woods Trail, White Mountains – There isn’t a grand story about how the Lincoln Woods Trail came to be, and the trail isn’t named for any famous person. However, this trail is the direct result of J.E. Henry’s historic East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948), and that is what makes it so unique.

The 2.9 mile-long Lincoln Woods Trails utilizes the railroad bed of the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad. It begins along the Kancamagus Highway at the Lincoln Woods trailhead, crosses a picturesque suspension bridge (above), and travels along the west side of the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River, and after crossing Franconia Brook, the trail abruptly ends at the Pemigewasset Wilderness boundary.

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