Posts Tagged: hiking



East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Trestle 7

Foot bridge along the Lincoln Woods Trail which crosses Franconia Brook in Lincoln, New Hampshire. Hikers enter into the Pemigewasset Wilderness on the righthand side of this bridge. Old abutments from Trestle 7 of the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948) are used to support this foot bridge.
The First Trestle 7 – Courtesy of the Upper Pemigewasset Historical Society
 

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Trestle 7 – During the days of the East Branch & Lincoln (EB&L) Railroad, there were two trestles built at this crossing of Franconia Brook (above). And each trestle serviced different areas of the railroad in today’s Pemigewasset Wilderness. The first trestle 7, known as the original trestle 7, seen above, was unique because horses used the lower deck to cross the brook.

The first trestle was built in the early 1900s, probably 1902, and it serviced the Franconia Brook and Lincoln Brook Branches of the railroad. It was used until 1911. The second trestle was built, probably in 1905, just below the first one and it was abandoned in 1947. And it serviced the Upper East Branch of the railroad (the area surrounding the East and North Fork branches of the Pemigewasset River).

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Interesting Finds, White Mountains

Downes - Oliverian Brook Ski Trail in winter conditions. This trail follows the old Swift River Railroad bed, which was a logging railroad in operation from 1906-1916. This location is near the old St Johns Camp site in the White Brook drainage of Albany, New Hampshire.
Downes-Oliverian Brook Ski Trail – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Interesting Finds, White Mountains – My documentary work of historic sites takes me to many areas of the White Mountain National Forest. And I have to admit I have come across many things that I just can’t explain. And today I want to share a few of these interesting finds with you.

What intrigues me about the history of the White Mountains is researching the who, what, and when of an area. Unfortunately, I don’t have time to research every oddity I come across. And I have done little research on the included finds. Hopefully, this summer I can do some research on them.

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Mountain Landscapes, Presidential Range

Appalachian Trail - Hiking on Crawford Path in the Presidential Range, which is  located in the White Mountain National Forest of New Hampshire USA. Mount Washington is in cloud cover.
Crawford Path – Mt Washington, New Hampshire
 

Six images of Mountain Landscapes, Presidential Range – Today, I am going to share with you landscape scenes from along the Appalachian Trail (AT) corridor in the Presidential Range of the New Hampshire White Mountains. I think its safe to say there is no other place in New England like the Presidential Range.

All of the images included in this blog article are from my medium format days (film), a time when photography was a much slower process. During the film days, I only had 15 shots to create a pleasing photo, and I wouldn’t know if I was successful at it until weeks later after the film was developed. I can’t help but reminisce about how different the photography industry is now than it was ten plus years ago.

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Greenleaf Trail, Mount Lafayette

Rock steps along Greenleaf Trail in the White Mountains of New Hampshire USA during the summer months. A path has formed on the right hand side to avoid the stone steps.
Greenleaf Trail – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Five images from Greenleaf Trail – Greenleaf Trail is located in Franconia Notch in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. I am lead to believe that the Greenleaf Trail is named after Colonel Charles Henry Greenleaf, once owner of the Profile House in Franconia Notch. The Greenleaf Hut, along Greenleaf Trail, is named in his honor so there appears to be a connection.

The Greenleaf Trail travels through an interesting forest, passes by Greenleaf Hut, and eventually ends on the summit of Mount Lafayette where a summit house once stood. And though the trail is located in a busy hiking area of the White Mountains it is lightly maintained. Hikers will actually feel like they are traversing a hiking trail.

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Standing Up For The White Mountains

Appalachian Trail (Gulfside Trail) - A hiker enjoys the sunset from Mount Clay in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Appalachian Trail – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Each year, I document a number of environmental issues in the White Mountains, and to start the New Year I am going to publicly share the four issues I will be documenting in 2015. The rest of my time will be focused on the scenic side of the White Mountains and New England region. This year I decided to just continue creating imagery for the visual journals that I have worked on for the last few years. Below are links to the journals.

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Winter Camera Protection, White Mountains

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links, and I will earn a commission if you use that link to make a purchase. This is to help support my blog.

Appalachian Trail - Extreme weather conditions near the summit of Mount Washington during the winter months in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Crawford Path – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Winter Camera Protection, White Mountains – When photographing in adverse winter conditions, one of my concerns is protecting camera gear from the elements. I find using products that are specifically made to protect the camera in harsh conditions to be beneficial. They do take some time to get use to, but are worth the investment.

During harsh weather conditions in the New Hampshire White Mountains, I use Camera Armor*, LensSkins*, and LensCoat*. And for down in the valleys and roadside I like using the Storm Jacket Covers*. These products act as covers for the camera and do a pretty good job at keeping the elements off the camera. The Storm Jacket covers are easy to put on and work well in all seasons. I use mine all the time when it is raining. 

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A Sense of Scale, White Mountains

Presidential Range - Sense of Scale, Hikers ascending the Subway Trail in King Ravine. The Subway Trail is a side trail off the King Ravine Trail, which travels through a large boulder field in King Ravine in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. The subway trail reconnects with the King Ravine Trail and snow can be found in the ice caves of this ravine during the summer months.
King Ravine Trail – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Sense of Scale Photos – To create a sense of scale in my New Hampshire White Mountains landscape imagery I try to include people or any object that will help viewers in determining the size of the scene. Including any object in a scene a viewer will recognize the size of works, but using people is usually the best option.

Everyone is familiar with the size of an average person, so the hikers included in these landscape scenes act as a reference point to help gauge the size of the scene. The size and depth of these scenes would be lost if the hikers were not included. And yes, the boulders (above) in King Ravine are huge!

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