Posts Tagged: hiking



Sense of Scale, White Mountains

Presidential Range - Sense of Scale, Hikers ascending the Subway Trail in King Ravine. The Subway Trail is a side trail off the King Ravine Trail, which travels through a large boulder field in King Ravine in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. The subway trail reconnects with the King Ravine Trail and snow can be found in the ice caves of this ravine during the summer months.
King Ravine Trail – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Sense of Scale, White Mountains – To create a sense of scale in my New Hampshire White Mountains landscape imagery I try to include people or any object that will help viewers in determining the size of the scene. Including any object in a scene a viewer will recognize the size of works, but using people is usually the best option.

Everyone is familiar with the size of an average person, so the hikers included in these landscape scenes act as a reference point to help gauge the size of the scene. The size and depth of these scenes would be lost if the hikers were not included. And yes, the boulders (above) in King Ravine are huge!

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Legitimate Flagging, White Mountains

Flagging and yellow blazing on birch tree along the Mount Tecumseh Trail in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. The Mt Tecumseh Trail is a perfect example – For a short time, a number of trees along the trail had unmarked survey flagging tape on them. These flagged trees were part of research being done by one of the local colleges. Once the field research was completed the flagging was removed. Mt Tecumseh Trail seems be the focal point of research because flagging is always on big and small trees along the trail.
Flagging on birch tree along Mt Tecumseh Trail
 

Legitimate Flagging (survey tape) – On a recent trail inspection with a Forest Service assistant district ranger, one topic of discussion was flagging tape on trees along the trail system of the White Mountains. I want to point out that some of the survey flagging tape you see along trails in the White Mountains marks trees that are being used for research. Much of this flagging has no identifying marks on it, and there is no way to determine its purpose. Once the research is finished, proper parties hike up the trail and remove the flagging.

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Mount Washington New Hampshire

Mt Washington from Davis Path in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. Mt Washington is on left and is the highest peak in the Northeast.
Mt Washington – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Mount Washington State Park, New Hampshire – At a height of 6,288 feet, Mount Washington is the Northeast's highest peak, home to the worst weather in the world, and a winter climber’s paradise. The 60 acres, more or less, surrounding the summit cone is part of the Mount Washington State Park.

The most well known historical event in the White Mountains happened on April 12, 1934. On this day, a wind gust of 231 miles per hour was recorded on Mount Washington by the Mount Washington Observatory staff. It was the fastest wind gust ever recorded on the surface of the Earth, and it wasn’t until sixty-two years later, in 1996, that an unmanned instrument station in Barrow Island, Australia broke the record with a recording of 253 miles per hour during Tropical Cyclone Olivia.

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Mount Pierce, Great Place To Start

The Presidential Range from Mount Pierce  – White Mountains, NH 
 

Mount Pierce, Great Place To Start – One of the easier and best "bang for your buck" hikes in the White Mountains of New Hampshire is Mount Pierce. You get alpine expose and beautiful views of the Presidential Range. All with the option of being able to retreat to the cover of the forest quickly. Very little of this hike is exposed, which makes it great training for hikers new to winter hiking. It is also a great area to practice using your camera in alpine conditions.

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Top 10 2010 White Mountains Photos

(Number 1) Lost Pond – White Mountains, NH
 

It's hard to pick only ten images to represent a year, but I think I managed. Since most of my focus and projects were in the White Mountains, I decided to only include imagery from the mountains.

1) Pinkham Notch  – Lost Pond on the side the Appalachian Trail. The reflection of Mount Washington and Huntington Ravine are excellent and worth a early morning visit.

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Sunrise & Sunset Photography

Sunset from Bald Mountain – White Mountains, New Hampshire  
 

Sunrise & Sunset Photography, New Hampshire – The setting sun and orange sky looks cool and get lots of attention on social media sites, but reality is the photography market is flooded with this kind of imagery. Don’t get me wrong every outdoor photographer in the world has these kind of shots on file, but the truth of the matter is these scenes have little market value. A simple solution to make these type of scenes more marketable – look away from the rising or setting sun and look for an interesting scene.

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White Mountains, NH Panoramics


White Mountains NH – Panoramic Images by ScenicNH Photography LLC

White Mountains, New Hampshire Panoramics – If you are looking for that perfect header for your personal or business website check out the panoramics section of ScenicNH Photography. Focused around the White Mountains of New Hampshire USA these images will work great on any website.

Images on file include Appalachian Trail, Cannon Mountain, Eagle Cliff, Mount Adams, Mount Eisenhower, Mount Jefferson, Mount Washington, Table Mountain, and the Presidential Range.

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Winter Hiking Safety and Photography

Appalachian Trail - Half moon at dawn from the summit of Mount Pierce in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Mt Pierce at dawn – White Mountains, NH 
 

Winter Hiking Safety and Photography – One winter, before sunrise, I was setup near the summit of Mt Pierce in the New Hampshire White Mountains photographing the moon. It was a perfect morning to be on the ridge with the temperature around 10 degrees.

As I was doing this, I watched a hiker come up out of the brush on the east / southeastern side of Mt Pierce. He was completely off track, and not on the trail. It caught me by surprise because the southeastern side of the mountain is not the best place to be during the winter months.

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