Posts Tagged: hill farm community



Abandoned Dug Wells, White Mountains

Photo of dug wells. Colonel Lewis B. Smith site in Sandwich Notch in Sandwich, New Hampshire USA. This abandoned farmstead was occupied by three generations of the Smith family from the 18th century to the late 19th century.
Dug Well at Colonel Lewis B. Smith Homestead – Sandwich, New Hampshire
 

Abandoned Dug Wells, White Mountains – Today’s blog article focuses on a keyword. I chose one search term, abandoned dug wells, and searched my image archive for imagery that represents this subject matter. These keyword searches help identify the subjects I need more coverage of. As a photographer, creating an image of an abandoned dug well that is visually interesting can be a challenge.

The New Hampshire White Mountains are littered with abandoned eighteenth and nineteenth century homesteads. And many of these homesteads had a water source – the dug well. These wells were dug by hand to just below the water table and were lined with stones or other material to keep it from collapsing. If you find a dug well in the middle of the forest, there is a good chance you are in the area of an old homestead.

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Sandwich Notch Hill Farming Community

The Andrew Munsey Place home site cellar hole along Sandwich Notch Road in New Hampshire.
Andrew Munsey Home Site – The Notch Community, New Hampshire
 

Sandwich Notch Hill Farming Community – Here is blog article number 2 of a two-part series that focuses on Sandwich Notch in New Hampshire. In part 1, I introduced you to the historic Sandwich Notch Road. And today I will be taking you on a visual journey of the abandoned nineteenth century hill farming community that once was in Sandwich Notch (The Notch).

It is hard to imagine that during the early nineteenth century, thirty to forty families lived in Sandwich Notch. A few Notch farms did strive, but the rocky terrain of the Notch was poor for farming, and it is no surprise that by 1860 only eight families lived in the Notch. Many families in the area left their farms and headed West to where farming was said to be better. By the turn of the twentieth century only one person, Moses Hall, lived in the Notch year around. Now a private residence the Hall Place (below) is the only house left on the Notch Road.

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Sandwich Notch Road, New Hampshire

Sandwich Notch Road in Sandwich, New Hampshire USA during the summer months. This historic route was established in 1801.
Established in 1801 – Sandwich Notch Road, New Hampshire
 

Sandwich Notch Road, New Hampshire – This blog article is written in two parts and focuses on Sandwich Notch in New Hampshire. Today, I will show you the scenic Sandwich Notch Road (Notch Road). And part 2 will be a visual journey of the nineteenth century hill farming community that once was along the Notch Road.

During the early nineteenth century, thirty to forty families lived in the Notch. By 1860 only eight families lived in the Notch and by the turn of the twentieth century only one person, Moses Hall, lived in the Notch year around. Now a private residence the Hall Place is the only house left on the Notch Road.

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