Posts Tagged: history



September History, White Mountains

September history, Ordination Rock in Tamworth, New Hampshire. This is where the Rev. Parson Samuel Hidden was ordained on September 12, 1792 and became the first settled minister in Tamworth.
Ordination Rock – Tamworth, New Hampshire
 

September History, White Mountains – When it comes to White Mountains history, two significant events took place in September. One event took place took along Route 3 near Lincoln on a September night in 1961. And the second event, which happened in 1964, involves President Lyndon Johnson making conservation history. Included here are a few more interesting events.

Ordination Rock in Tamworth is where Rev. Parson Samuel Hidden was ordained on September 12, 1792, and became the first settled minister in Tamworth. He is buried in the cemetery located next to Ordination Rock.

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August History, White Mountains

August history, Willey Boulders in Crawford Notch State Park in Hart’s Location, New Hampshire. These boulders saved the Willey House from destruction on August 28, 1826 when a massive landslide came down Mount Willey.
Willey Boulders – Crawford Notch, New Hampshire
 

August History, White Mountains – When it comes to White Mountains history, some interesting events happened during August. Landslides in 1885 changed the landscape of Mount Tripyramid, fire destroyed Woodstock Lumber Company’s huge mill complex in 1913, and a grand resort (Profile House) burned down in 1923. But this is just the beginning. Included here are a few more interesting events.

On August 28, 1826, the "Willey Boulders" in Crawford Notch saved the Willey House from destruction when a massive landslide came down Mount Willey. These boulders located just above the house caused the landslide to split into two debris flows around the house. The house was said to be untouched, but all seven members of the family and two hired men perished in the slide while trying to escape to a safe area.

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July History, White Mountains

July history, Middle Sister Fire tower on Middle Sister Mountain in Albany, New Hampshire USA during a summer night. This fire tower was in operation from 1927-1948.
Middle Sister Mountain – Albany, New Hampshire
 

July History, White Mountains – July in the New Hampshire White Mountains is a great time of year. Hikers are exploring the trails, fishermen are fishing the rivers, and campers are enjoying the campgrounds. Throughout the history of the White Mountains, outdoor recreation has been a favorite pastime for many families during this month. And some interesting historical events took place during July.

Named for Matthew Thornton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, the town of Thornton was granted to Matthew Thornton and others on July 6, 1763. The charter consisted of 23,000 acres divided into seventy-three shares. However, no settlements were made under the original grant, and a new charter was given in October 1768. But because of slow development, the town would not be officially incorporated until November 1781.

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February History, White Mountains

White Mountains, February history; a winter hiker ascending the Air Line Trail in extreme weather conditions in the White Mountains, New Hampshire
Air Line Trail – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

February History, White Mountains – The history of the New Hampshire White Mountains can be looked at from many different perspectives. One of the more interesting ways to look at it is from a monthly viewpoint.

From a historical point of view, February is a deadly month in the White Mountains. Throughout the years, avalanches, climbing falls, hypothermia, and skiing accidents have taken a number of lives during this month. Most of these incidents have been well documented, so below are a few not so well known events that happened during the month of February.

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Pemigewasset Wilderness, Random History

One of the stone abutments that support the abandoned Trestle No. 16 in the Pemigewasset Wilderness of New Hampshire.
Trestle No. 16 (2010), East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Pemigewasset Wilderness
 

Pemigewasset Wilderness, Random History – This designated wilderness is the result of one the greatest conservation laws ever passed; the Wilderness Act, which has protected over 109 million acres across the United States. While the history of New Hampshire's Pemigewasset Wilderness mostly revolves around the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, the railroad is not the only interesting piece of history surrounding this unique region of the White Mountains. This blog article features random tidbits of history about this one of a kind designated wilderness area.

One of the grandest pieces of New Hampshire logging railroad history, trestle No. 16 (above) collapsed in late May or early June 2018. Spanning Black Brook, it stood for over 100 years and became a favorite attraction among outdoor enthusiasts. Logging railroads were built to be temporary and its remarkable that this trestle stood for as long as it did. The last log train rolled over this trestle most likely in the summer or fall of 1946.

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Presidential Range, Random History

Presidential Range from Eisenhower Wayside Park along Route 302 in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. Mount Washington is off in the distance snow-capped.
Presidential Range – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Presidential Range, Random History – The Presidential Range in the New Hampshire White Mountains is known worldwide for having some of the worst weather in the world. And the main attraction of the range is the mighty Mount Washington. At 6,288 feet, Mount Washington is the highest peak in the Northeastern United States. And with the famed Appalachian Trail traveling through this scenic mountain range, it is a busy area.

The first recorded ascent, Darby Field in 1642, and fatality, Frederick Strickland in 1849, on Mount Washington has been well-publicized and is known among outdoor enthusiasts who play in the White Mountains. And because of the significance of these events, some of the history surrounding the Presidential Range is overlooked. So included here are a few tidbits of history about this fascinating mountain range.

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Random Trail History, White Mountains

Mount Washington from the Camel Trail in Sargent's Purchase of the New Hampshire White Mountains.
Camel Trail – Mount Washington, New Hampshire
 

Random Trail History, White Mountains – Think about these White Mountains history facts for a moment. Crawford Path is the oldest continuously-used mountain trail in America. Trail maker Charles E. Lowe and Dr. William G. Nowell built Lowe’s Path in 1875-1876. Nathaniel Davis, son-in-law of Abel and Hannah Crawford, built Davis Path in 1845. Nathaniel L. Goodrich (1880-1957) is considered to be the founder of peakbagging in the White Mountains.

In this era of outdoor recreation (camping, fishing, hiking, etc.) the ones who explored the New Hampshire White Mountains before us are being forgotten about. So today’s blog article focuses on random tidbits of history surrounding the White Mountains trail system.

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Forgotten Lincoln, New Hampshire

RiverWalk Resort at Loon Mountain in Lincoln, New Hampshire during the autumn months. This resort occupies the site of the old mill complex that J.E Henry and Sons built in the early 1900s.
RiverWalk Resort – Village of Lincoln, New Hampshire
 

Forgotten Lincoln, New Hampshire – On January 31, 1764, Governor Benning Wentworth granted 24,000 acres of land to James Avery of Connecticut and others. Avery was also granted the town of Landaff on the same day. None of the grantees lived in Lincoln, and it is likely that they never visited the township. Lincoln was named after Henry Fiennes Pelham-Clinton, 2nd Duke of Newcastle, 9th Earl of Lincoln.

Per the charter, the grantees failed to settle the town in time. And in 1772 the Governor declared the Lincoln charter a forfeit and re-granted Lincoln, along with most of Franconia, to Sir Francis Bernard and others. The name of the new township was Morristown in honor of Corbin Morris, one of the grantees.

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