Posts Tagged: history



Forgotten Lincoln, New Hampshire

RiverWalk Resort at Loon Mountain in Lincoln, New Hampshire during the autumn months. This resort occupies the site of the old mill complex that J.E Henry and Sons built in the early 1900s.
RiverWalk Resort – Village of Lincoln, New Hampshire
 

Forgotten Lincoln, New Hampshire – On January 31, 1764, Governor Benning Wentworth granted 24,000 acres of land to James Avery of Connecticut and others. Avery was also granted the town of Landaff on the same day. None of the grantees lived in Lincoln, and it is likely that they never visited the township. Lincoln was named after Henry Fiennes Pelham-Clinton, 2nd Duke of Newcastle, 9th Earl of Lincoln.

Per the charter, the grantees failed to settle the town in time. And in 1772 the Governor declared the Lincoln charter a forfeit and re-granted Lincoln, along with most of Franconia, to Sir Francis Bernard and others. The name of the new township was Morristown in honor of Corbin Morris, one of the grantees.

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Forgotten Woodstock, New Hampshire

Mirror Lake in New Hampshire during the summer months.
Mirror Lake – Woodstock, New Hampshire
 

Forgotten Woodstock, New Hampshire – Chartered in September 1763 by Governor Benning Wentworth, the town of Woodstock was first incorporated as Peeling. The charter, consisting of 25,000 acres, was granted to Eli Demerit and others and was divided into ninety-eight equal shares. In 1771, the land was regranted to Nathaniel Cushman and others and divided into seventy equal shares and renamed Fairfield. Then in 1773, it was regranted as Peeling back to some of the original proprietors. The name was changed to Woodstock in 1840.

Today the mountainous landscape of Woodstock is picture perfect. And the village of North Woodstock gets so much recognition that you would think North Woodstock received its own charter. But it didn’t and is part of the Woodstock charter. Much of the town's history is well known, but some of it has been forgotten. And this blog article focuses on a few of the forgotten historical features of Woodstock.

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February 1959 Plane Crash, Pemi Wilderness

Memorial for Dr. Ralph E. Miller and Dr. Robert E. Quinn in the Thoreau Falls valley of the Pemigewasset Wilderness in Lincoln, New Hampshire. The doctors successfully crash landed their plane on February 21, 1959 in this location along the abandoned railroad bed of the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad. They survived for four days before dying of exposure.
Abandoned Section of the Thoreau Falls Trail – Pemigewasset Wilderness, New Hampshire
 

February 1959 Plane Crash, Pemigewasset Wilderness – On Saturday, February 21, 1959 a Piper Comanche airplane took off from the Berlin, New Hampshire Airport, around 3:30 p.m., destined for Lebanon, New Hampshire Airport. The pilot was Dr. Ralph E. Miller and his passenger was Dr. Robert E. Quinn. Both were doctors affiliated with Dartmouth Medical School.

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Willey Brook Trestle, World War 1 Guard Duty

Crawford Notch State Park - Willey Brook Trestle along the old Maine Central Railroad in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. The Mt. Willard Section House was located just to the right of the trestle. This railroad is now used by the Conway Scenic Railroad.
Willey Brook Trestle – Crawford Notch, New Hampshire  
 

Willey Brook Trestle, World War 1 Guard Duty – Many know of the Willey Brook Trestle along the old Maine Central Railroad in Crawford Notch, but some of the history surrounding the bridge is not widely known. And to appreciate this article, a little railroad history is needed.

Chartered in 1867 as the Portland & Ogdensburg Railroad, reorganized as the Portland & Ogdensburg Railway in 1886 and then leased to the Maine Central Railroad in 1888 and later abandoned in 1983. Since 1995 the Conway Scenic Railroad, which provides passenger excursion trains, has been using the track. The building of this railroad through the rugged terrain of Crawford Notch was an amazing feat during the 1800s. Above is a photo showing the landscape of the Willey Brook drainage.

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Nansen Ski Jump, Milan

Nansen Ski Jump in Milan New Hampshire USA. This jump was constructed in 1936 and in 1938 Olympic Trials were held here. The jump was closed in 1988.
Nansen Ski Jump – Milan, New Hampshire  
 

Nansen Ski Jump, New Hampshire – Located along Route 16 in Milan, New Hampshire is the Nansen Wayside Park, which is home to the historical Nansen Ski Jump. Built in 1936 the Nansen Ski Jump at one time held major ski championships. And in 1938 the first Olympic Trials were held on the site.

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Sawyer River Railroad, New Hampshire

Sawyer River in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA during the autumn months.
Sawyer River – Livermore, New Hampshire
 

Sawyer River Railroad, New Hampshire – In 1875, the State Legislature approved an act to Incorporate the Sawyer River Railroad. Operated by the Daniel Saunders Family, the Sawyer River Railroad was a ten-mile long logging railroad in the New Hampshire White Mountains town of Livermore. It was in operation from 1877-1928 and was one of the last logging railroads to operate in New Hampshire.

The railroad began along the Portland & Ogdensburg Railroad at Sawyer River Station, near Forth Iron Bridge, in Hart's Location. And it traveled up into the Sawyer River Valley and into the upper end of the Swift River drainage in Livermore. Like most of the abandoned railroads in New England, the Sawyer River Railroad is rich with history.

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