Posts Tagged: J.E. Henry



December History, White Mountains

December history, Flume Covered Bridge in Franconia Notch State Park in Lincoln, New Hampshire during the night.
Flume Covered Bridge at Night – Lincoln, New Hampshire
 

December History, White Mountains – Here in the White Mountains, December is an exciting month. The ski mountains open for business, hikers are preparing for the official kickoff of the winter hiking season, and snowmobiles are being tuned up. If you enjoy the outdoors, winter is a great time to explore the region.

When it comes to White Mountains history, a handful of events happened in December. J.E. Henry’s mill burns down, a section house was razed, turnpikes were incorporated, and the Underhills became the first people to complete the White Mountain Four 4000 footers during the winter. Included here are a few interesting events.

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Lincoln Woods Trail, White Mountains

East Branch of the Pemigewasset River, near the Lincoln Woods Trailhead Suspension footbridge, in Lincoln, New Hampshire during the autumn months.
Suspension Bridge – Lincoln Woods Trailhead, White Mountains
 

Lincoln Woods Trail, White Mountains – There isn’t a grand story about how the Lincoln Woods Trail came to be, and the trail isn’t named for any famous person. However, this trail is the direct result of J.E. Henry’s historic East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948), and that is what makes it so unique.

The 2.9 mile-long Lincoln Woods Trails utilizes the railroad bed of the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad. It begins along the Kancamagus Highway at the Lincoln Woods trailhead, crosses a picturesque suspension bridge (above), and travels along the west side of the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River, and after crossing Franconia Brook, the trail abruptly ends at the Pemigewasset Wilderness boundary.

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James E. Henry, White Mountains History

Grave site of James E. Henry (1831-1912) at Glenwood Cemetery in Littleton, New Hampshire USA. J.E. Henry was a 19th and 20th-century timber baron known for his East Branch & Lincoln Railroad in Lincoln, New Hampshire. Historians suggest he was born in 1831 and died on April 19, 1912.
J.E. Henry Burial Site (1831 – 1912) – Glenwood Cemetery, Littleton
 

James Everell Henry (1831 – April 18, 1912) – James E. Henry died at his home on April 18, 1912. He was a 19th and 20th-century timber baron best known for his logging practices and building of the Zealand Valley and East Branch & Lincoln Railroads in the New Hampshire White Mountains. He forever changed the landscape of the White Mountains with his "cut it all" logging practices.

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