Posts Tagged: jewell trail



Jewell Trail, White Mountains

Southern Presidential Range from the Jewell Trail in Thompson and Meserve's Purchase in the New Hampshire White Mountains at sunset on a cloudy summer day. The Jewell Trail is named for Sergeant Winfield S. Jewell. He was an Army Signal Corps observer on Mount Washington from 1878-1880. And on April 12, 1884, while on the Greely expedition to the Arctic, Jewell died of starvation. Out of the 25 men on the three year Greeley expedition (1881–1884), only six survived.
Sunset – Jewell Trail, White Mountains
 

Jewell Trail, White Mountains – Established in 1934, the roughly 3.7 mile long Jewell Trail begins at a trailhead on Base Station Road in Chandler's Purchase, New Hampshire. It travels up an unnamed ridge of Mount Clay, eventually ending at the Gulfside Trail; the Gulfside Trail is a segment of the scenic Appalachian Trail. Upon reaching the junction with the Gulfside Trail, many hikers continue on to Mount Washington.

The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) were involved in the building of the trail. The CCC was a public work relief program that operated from 1933 to 1942 in the United States; they built bridges, roads, trails, and many other structures in the New Hampshire White Mountains.

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April History, White Mountains

White Mountains, April history; moonrise behind Mount Eisenhower in the White Mountains of New Hampshire USA during the spring months.
Mount Eisenhower Moonrise (April, 2015) – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

April History, White Mountains – When it comes to the history of the New Hampshire White Mountains, like March, so many historical events took place throughout the years during the month of April that listing all of them isn’t possible. So included here are just a few interesting historical events.

The first reference is for the hikers. In April 1863, Professor Albert Hopkins, a professor at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts, founded the Alpine Club of Williamstown. Recognized by most as the first hiking club in America, the club remained active only until 1865, but they did hike in the White Mountains.

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