Posts Tagged: lincoln



January History, White Mountains

January history, Presidential Range at sunset from Owl's Head (Cherry Mountain) in Carroll, New Hampshire USA during the winter months. The Cohos Trail passes by this view.
Owl's Head (Cherry Mountain) – Carroll, New Hampshire
 

January History, White Mountains – Here in the White Mountains, January is like no other month. The winter season is in full swing, and outdoor enthusiasts are enjoying the snow-covered landscape. Usually, we have had at least one big snowstorm by now, but this year the snow accumulation is on the low side. Hopefully, we get a blizzard sooner than later.

When it comes to White Mountains history, some interesting events happened in January. The town of Lincoln was granted, the United States Geological Survey built a stream gauging station, and a horrific plane crash awoke the quiet town of Woodstock. Continue reading to learn more about these events.

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2021 Year in Review, White Mountains

2021, the Flume Covered Bridge in Franconia Notch, New Hampshire covered in snow on an autumn morning. This picturesque bridge crosses the Pemigewasset River.
Flume Covered Bridge – Flume Gorge, New Hampshire
 

2021 Year in Review, White Mountains – As the year comes to an end, I don't have much to say. And like many of you, I am looking forward to the start of the new year. What a year it has been! This year I am going to keep it short and just make a handful of comments about my favorite images of 2021.

Over the last few years, all we have heard about is how overrun the White Mountains are now. And I agree it is an issue that needs to be addressed. Our trailheads are overflowing into the streets, mountains summits are overcrowded with peakbaggers looking for the perfect selfie, and campgrounds are beyond capacity. But because of the "off the beaten path" locations I have been documenting over the last two years, I have seen almost no one in the White Mountains. Serenity still can be found in the White Mountains.

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December History, White Mountains

December history, Flume Covered Bridge in Franconia Notch State Park in Lincoln, New Hampshire during the night.
Flume Covered Bridge at Night – Lincoln, New Hampshire
 

December History, White Mountains – Here in the White Mountains, December is an exciting month. The ski mountains open for business, hikers are preparing for the official kickoff of the winter hiking season, and snowmobiles are being tuned up. If you enjoy the outdoors, winter is a great time to explore the region.

When it comes to White Mountains history, a handful of events happened in December. J.E. Henry’s mill burns down, a section house was razed, turnpikes were incorporated, and the Underhills became the first people to complete the White Mountain Four 4000 footers during the winter. Included here are a few interesting events.

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October History, White Mountains

October history, Beaver Brook Cascades on Beaver Brook in Kinsman Notch in the New Hampshire White Mountains during the autumn months. A segment of the scenic Appalachian Tail, the steep and rough Beaver Brook Trail passes by these cascades. Completed in 1937, the roughly 2,190 mile long Appalachian Trail (A.T.) begins in Georgia and ends in Maine.
Beaver Brook – Appalachian Tail, New Hampshire
 

October History, White Mountains – October in the White Mountains is like no other month. With fall foliage peaking during this time of year, our mountain towns, hiking trails, and roadways are crowded with travelers interested in viewing the spectacular foliage. The foliage was excellent this year!

When it comes to White Mountains history, a number of interesting events took place in October. A Shawnee warrior indirectly linked to the White Mountains was killed, thousands of acres of land was granted, and lumber companies were formed. Included here are a few interesting events.

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August History, White Mountains

August history, Willey Boulders in Crawford Notch State Park in Hart’s Location, New Hampshire. These boulders saved the Willey House from destruction on August 28, 1826 when a massive landslide came down Mount Willey.
Willey Boulders – Crawford Notch, New Hampshire
 

August History, White Mountains – When it comes to White Mountains history, some interesting events happened during August. Landslides in 1885 changed the landscape of Mount Tripyramid, fire destroyed Woodstock Lumber Company’s huge mill complex in 1913, and a grand resort (Profile House) burned down in 1923. But this is just the beginning. Included here are a few more interesting events.

On August 28, 1826, the "Willey Boulders" in Crawford Notch saved the Willey House from destruction when a massive landslide came down Mount Willey. These boulders located just above the house caused the landslide to split into two debris flows around the house. The house was said to be untouched, but all seven members of the family and two hired men perished in the slide while trying to escape to a safe area.

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May History, White Mountains

May history, East Branch of the Pemigewasset River in Lincoln, New Hampshire USA during the spring months.
East Branch of the Pemigewasset River – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

May History, White Mountains – Throughout the years, a number of historical events in the White Mountains happened in May. One event that took place over one hundred years ago still benefits us today, and New Hampshire lost an icon during this month in 2003. Included here are a few interesting May events.

The most significant event took place on May 16, 1918. On this day, President Woodrow Wilson signed Executive Order 1449 creating the White Mountain National Forest in Maine and New Hampshire. Consisting of nearly 800,000 acres, the White Mountain National Forest attracts millions of visitors every year.

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February History, White Mountains

White Mountains, February history; a winter hiker ascending the Air Line Trail in extreme weather conditions in the White Mountains, New Hampshire
Air Line Trail – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

February History, White Mountains – The history of the New Hampshire White Mountains can be looked at from many different perspectives. One of the more interesting ways to look at it is from a monthly viewpoint.

From a historical point of view, February is a deadly month in the White Mountains. Throughout the years, avalanches, climbing falls, hypothermia, and skiing accidents have taken a number of lives during this month. Most of these incidents have been well documented, so below are a few not so well known events that happened during the month of February.

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Identifying Artifacts, White Mountains

An axe head, a protected artifact, near logging Camp 2 of the abandoned Sawyer River Railroad (1877-1928) in Livermore, New Hampshire.
Axe Head – Livermore, New Hampshire
 

Identifying Historical Artifacts, White Mountains – If you are picking up trash in the New Hampshire White Mountains during the current human impact issue, please educate yourself about historical artifacts and the laws that protect them. I now know of two instances where do-gooders picking up trash removed artifacts, thinking they were trash, from the White Mountain National Forest.

Many of the metal objects (horseshoes, metal strapping, railroad spikes, stoves, tins, etc.), glass bottles, trestle remains, and numerous other objects along the White Mountains trail system are protected artifacts. These artifacts should be left where you found them; they help tell the story of the early settlers, farming communities, and logging railroads that once were in the White Mountains. The included photos show some of the various artifacts you could come across while out hiking.

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