Posts Tagged: Livermore



White Mountains, February History

White Mountains, February history; a winter hiker ascending the Air Line Trail in extreme weather conditions in the White Mountains, New Hampshire
Air Line Trail – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

White Mountains, February History – The history of the New Hampshire White Mountains can be looked at from many different perspectives. One of the more interesting ways to look at it is from a monthly viewpoint.

From a historical point of view, February is a deadly month in the White Mountains. Throughout the years, avalanches, climbing falls, hypothermia, and skiing accidents have taken a number of lives during this month. Most of these incidents have been well documented, so below are a few not so well known events that happened during the month of February.

Continue reading right arrow

2020 Year in Review, White Mountains

The Pemigewasset River near the Flume Visitor Center in Franconia Notch State Park in Lincoln, New Hampshire covered in snow on a cloudy autumn day.
Pemigewasset River – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

2020 Year in Review, White Mountains – As the year comes to an end, I am still trying to understand this pandemic. And I am also still trying to grasp how badly overrun the White Mountains have been this year. While there appears to be a vaccine for the virus, there is no immediate solution for the current human impact issue here in the White Mountains.

If you live in the White Mountains region, did you ever think the outdoor community would be fighting about the definition of “local” and vehicles at trailheads being vandalized just because they have out-of-state license plates? With social media fueling the fire, this year has been an awful display of what the White Mountains outdoor community is all about. For better or worse, social media has changed outdoor recreation.

Continue reading right arrow

Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad

Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad in the New Hampshire White Mountains.
Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad – Incorporated in March 1909, this short-lived logging railroad was operated by the Woodstock Lumber Company, a subsidy of the Parker-Young Company. It began at the Woodstock Lumber Company’s sawmill (built by the Publishers Paper Company) on the western bank of the Pemigewasset River in Woodstock, New Hampshire. From the mill, it traveled roughly 7 miles into the Eastman Brook drainage, traveling through the northern portion of Thornton*, known as the “Gore”, ending in Livermore.

For a couple of years before the railroad was built, horse teams were used to drag logs out of the forest to the Woodstock sawmill. But once the Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad was established, the Iron Horse took over the duties. Some of Tripoli Road and Little East Pond Trail utilize the old railroad bed. Three Shay geared locomotives, all 50-tonners, were used on the railroad, and the track equipment was leased from the Boston & Maine Railroad.

Continue reading right arrow

Identifying Artifacts, White Mountains

An axe head, a protected artifact, near logging Camp 2 of the abandoned Sawyer River Railroad (1877-1928) in Livermore, New Hampshire.
Axe Head – Livermore, New Hampshire
 

Identifying Historical Artifacts, White Mountains – If you are picking up trash in the New Hampshire White Mountains during the 2020 human impact issue, please educate yourself about historical artifacts and the laws that protect them. I now know of two instances where do-gooders picking up trash removed artifacts, thinking they were trash, from the White Mountain National Forest.

Many of the metal objects (horseshoes, metal strapping, railroad spikes, stoves, tins, etc.), glass bottles, trestle remains, and numerous other objects along the White Mountains trail system are protected artifacts. These artifacts should be left where you found them; they help tell the story of the early settlers, farming communities, and logging railroads that once were in the White Mountains. The included photos show some of the various artifacts you could come across while out hiking.

Continue reading right arrow

Five Historic Sites To Visit, White Mountains

Remnants of the historic powerhouse at the abandoned town of Livermore during the autumn months. This was a logging town in the late 19th and early 20th centuries along the Sawyer River Logging Railroad in Livermore, New Hampshire. The town and railroad was owned by the Saunders family.
Ghost Town of Livermore – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Five Historic Sites To Visit, White Mountains – Many historic sites in the New Hampshire White Mountains are well known among locals and tourists while others remain forgotten deep in the forest and probably will never be rediscovered. The known sites can help create awareness for historic preservation.

Today I want to share with you a few of the historic sites that are worth visiting in the White Mountains region. I have spent many days exploring and photographing the historic sites included in this blog article. Each site is unique and helps tell the fascinating story of the White Mountains.

Continue reading right arrow

Village of Livermore, New Hampshire

Foundation of the sawmill in the abandoned town of Livermore during the autumn months. This was a logging town in the late 19th and early 20th centuries along the Sawyer River Railroad in the New Hampshire White Mountains. Both the town and railroad were owned by the Saunders family.
Sawmill – Livermore, New Hampshire
 

Village of Livermore, New Hampshire – Incorporated by the state of New Hampshire in 1876, Livermore was a logging town in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The village of Livermore was located along the Sawyer River Railroad, on the Sawyer River, in the White Mountains. Both the railroad and town were owned by the Saunders family. At its peak, the population of Livermore was around 150-200 people, but as time progressed more and more people left the town. The town of Livermore was officially dissolved in 1951.

The history of Livermore has been well documented over the years. So instead of repeating what can be easily found on the internet, I will take you on a photo tour of one of the more interesting ghost towns in the New Hampshire White Mountains.

Continue reading right arrow

Greeley Ponds Scenic Area, Livermore

Greeley Ponds Scenic Area - Reflection of forest and mountain in Upper Greeley Pond in the White Mountains, New Hampshire. This is a great short hike to two beautiful ponds.
Upper Greeley Pond – Greeley Ponds Scenic Area, New Hampshire
 

Greeley Ponds Scenic Area, Livermore – Located in Livermore, New Hampshire in between Mount Kancamagus and the East Peak of Mount Osceola is the Greeley Ponds Scenic Area. Designated a scenic area in 1964, this 810-acre parcel of land in the White Mountains contains mature hardwood forest and two scenic mountain ponds.

The two mountain ponds offer interesting photographic opportunities. And early in the morning a nice reflection of the Osceola Mountain range can be seen in the upper pond (above and below). And the forest surrounding the ponds consists of an interesting mix of hardwoods and softwoods.

Continue reading right arrow