Posts Tagged: mt tecumseh trail



Mt Tecumseh Trail, New Hampshire

October 2011 -Drainage ditch / Stone steps along the Mount Tecumseh Trail in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. The area on the left is in the process of collapsing.  After a trail inspection by Forest Service in June 2012, they (FS) stepped in and took control of ongoing work along this trail. It has been suggested this erosion issue will need to be corrected by a professional trail crew.
October 2011 – New completed stonework / hillside stands out
 

Mt Tecumseh Trail, New Hampshire – Today I hiked the Mt Tecumseh Trail in Waterville Valley to photograph a section of fairly new stonework. In October of 2011 I was asked to photograph this work, and at the time I questioned the quality of work, so I have continued to photograph it. The included photos show that the hillside is collapsing, and the steps are not holding up. This section will need to be maintained indefinitely or properly fixed.

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Legitimate Flagging, White Mountains

Flagging and yellow blazing on birch tree along the Mount Tecumseh Trail in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. The Mt Tecumseh Trail is a perfect example – For a short time, a number of trees along the trail had unmarked survey flagging tape on them. These flagged trees were part of research being done by one of the local colleges. Once the field research was completed the flagging was removed. Mt Tecumseh Trail seems be the focal point of research because flagging is always on big and small trees along the trail.
Flagging on birch tree along Mt Tecumseh Trail
 

Legitimate Flagging (survey tape) – On a recent trail inspection with a Forest Service assistant district ranger, one topic of discussion was flagging tape on trees along the trail system of the White Mountains. I want to point out that some of the survey flagging tape you see along trails in the White Mountains marks trees that are being used for research. Much of this flagging has no identifying marks on it, and there is no way to determine its purpose. Once the research is finished, proper parties hike up the trail and remove the flagging.

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