Posts Tagged: mt tecumseh



Mount Tecumseh Vandalism, Illegal Cutting

Stumps of trees illegally cut in 2013 are cut flush with the ground on the summit of Mount Tecumseh in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire.
July 2014, Fresh Cutting – Mt Tecumseh, New Hampshire
 

Mount Tecumseh Vandalism, Illegal Cutting – When I first went public with the environmental issues on Mount Tecumseh, I was warned that my business would become the focal point of a smear campaign if I continued to cover the issues. After years of covering issues on this mountain, I can say that the harassment I have received has not deterred me from creating awareness for the human impact on Mount Tecumseh.*

According to Forest Service, the cutting on New Hampshire's Mount Tecumseh is illegal, and is considered vandalism to National Forest land. As far as I know, Forest Service's law enforcement division is still actively investigating the cutting. For my involvement, as a photographer, I have been unofficially volunteering my time to document the cutting. I am against this type of vandalism, and report any findings to Forest Service.

Continue reading right arrow

Mt Tecumseh Trail, New Hampshire

July 2016 - Newly built stone steps along the Mt Tecumseh Trail in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire during the month of July. Minimal stonework should be done along trails, and it should look natural and blend in with the surroundings.
New Staircase (2016) – Mt Tecumseh Trail, New Hampshire
 

Mt Tecumseh Trail, New Hampshire For five years (2011-2016), I documented issues on Mt Tecumseh in New Hampshire. In my opinion, what has happened to the Mt Tecumseh Trail over the last few years is a disgusting display of conservation and trail stewardship. The new stonework built along this trail is all about quantity, not quality, and I question what low impact, sustainable, trail work is.

In August 2016, for the second time since 2012, the Pemigewasset District of Forest Service, at the request of the Washington Office, inspected the ongoing stonework along the Mt Tecumseh Trail. According to a letter I received from Forest Service Supervisor, Tom Wagner, the stonework is “satisfactory” for Forest Service Trail construction standards. And they did find issues that would be taken care of in the future. The definition of satisfactory is “fulfilling expectations or needs; acceptable, though not outstanding or perfect.”

Continue reading right arrow

2014 Favorite Images White Mountains

Durand Lake in Randolph, New Hampshire USA at sunrise during the autumn months.
Durand Lake – Randolph, New Hampshire
 

2014 Favorite Images – It is that time of year again when I reflect on a years worth of shooting, and share with you my ten favorite images from the 2014 season. These images are the ones that stood out to me over the year. You can see a larger preview of any image by clicking on it.

Working with photography day in and day out, I tend to forget some of the incredible places I visit during the year. This end of the season post helps remind me of these places, and as to why I became a photographer in the first place. This year I included a few images not from the White Mountains to break it up some. I say it every year, and I am going to say it again today, the landscape of the White Mountains is incredible!

Continue reading right arrow

Trail Work Erosion, White Mountains

October 2011 - Newly installed stonework along the Mt Tecumseh Trail in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. After an inspection by FS in June 2012, it has been suggested this issue (large holes on left) will need to be corrected by a professional trail crew. In less than one year the hillside is collapsing and the stonework is not holding up. See here: http://bit.ly/1qY9GZY.
October 2011 – New Stonework, Mt Tecumseh Trail
 

Trail Work Erosion, White Mountains – The included images show how a section of the Mt Tecumseh Trail in the New Hampshire White Mountains has elapsed over time. The first two images are from October 2011 and the last image is from October 2017. The intent of this visual journal is to record the progression of hillside erosion on the left-hand side of the trail and to document how this section of trail holds up to foot traffic.

I am using a technique known as photo monitoring to document this section of trail. Photo monitoring consists of repeat photography of an area over a period of time. Photo monitoring is used in land management to help recognize issues that are not immediately obvious from one or two visits to a location. The ending result is a permanent visual record and journal that showcases the environmental changes of a particular location.

Continue reading right arrow

Mt Tecumseh Summit Vandalism

Scenic views from the summit of  Mount Tecumseh during the winter months in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
January 2009 – Mt Tecumseh Summit Viewpoint
 

Mt Tecumseh Summit Vandalism – Someone or some group is illegally cutting down trees to improve the summit viewpoint on Mt Tecumseh in Waterville Valley of New Hampshire. I am using photo monitoring, also known as repeat photography, to create a visual journal that shows progression of illegal cutting on the summit. I update the visual journal, at the below link, with a new image after each monthly visit I make to Mt Tecumseh. For full impact of this issue, I encourage you to watch the full screen visual presentation (slideshow) here.

Two trails lead to the Mt Tecumseh summit. One from Tripoli Road that is lightly maintained and a joy to hike. The other from the ski area is excessively maintained and has more stonework than most parks in Boston.

Continue reading right arrow

Repaired Trail Blazing, Trail Maintenance

Trail blazing along the Mt Tecumseh Trail in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. A proper blaze is a two by six inch rectangle. Spills and runs should be wiped away when applied, and once dried runs can be removed using proper techniques. See trail maintenance guidelines if you are unsure on proper blazing protocol. After a trail inspection by Forest Service in June 2012, they (FS) stepped in on the ongoing work. This dripping blaze has been removed by proper parties.
September 2011 – Improper Trail Blazing, Mt Tecumseh Trail
 

Repaired Trail Blazing, Trail Maintenance – Some of the issues along the Mt Tecumseh Trail in Waterville Valley New Hampshire have been addressed and corrected by Forest Service. I commend Forest Service for correcting issues along this trail. And it is satisfying to know they are taking the needed steps to improve the White Mountains trail system.

In 2011, while hiking the Mt Tecumseh Trail, I noted a trail blazing issue, so I reported it to Forest Service. The trail blazing was not per trail maintenance guidelines and ruined the overall beauty of the trail. The Ranger who looked into it and responded, via email, stated a bad can of paint was the cause. Included in this blog article are before & after photos of the trail blazing that was removed.

Continue reading right arrow