Posts Tagged: national forest



2018 White Mountains, NH Calendar

Front cover of the 2018 scenic White Mountains, New Hampshire wall calendar by ScenicNH Photography LLC | Erin Paul Donovan.
Front Cover – 2018 White Mountains Wall Calendar
 

2018 New Hampshire White Mountains Wall Calendar – It is calendar season! And today, I want to share with you the front and back covers of my scenic White Mountains calendar. This is a professional designed and printed 12-month calendar, and it measures 12” x 12" closed, and 12” x 24” when opened. It has a date grid for noting appointments, and also includes holidays of major religions, phases of the moon, and sunrise and sunset times. The calendar showcases the landscape of the New Hampshire White Mountains.

On the front cover (above) is Cherry Mountain from Moorhen Marsh. This view can be seen from along the Presidential Range Rail Trail at Pondicherry Wildlife Refuge. Pondicherry is an incredible place worth visiting at least once. Though close to civilization the refuge is very peaceful, and I visit it as much as psossible. Sunrise and sunset are great times to visit the area. This scene of Cherry Mountain also represents the month of June.

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Mount Tecumseh Cutting, My Viewpoint

Stumps of trees illegally cut in 2013 are cut flush with the ground on the summit of Mount Tecumseh in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire.
July 2014, Fresh Cutting – Mt Tecumseh, New Hampshire
 

Mount Tecumseh Cutting, My Viewpoint – When I first went public with the environmental issues on Mount Tecumseh, I was warned that my business would become the focal point of a smear campaign if I continued to cover Mount Tecumseh. After five years of covering issues on this mountain, I can say that the harassment I have received has not deterred me from creating awareness for the human impact on Mount Tecumseh.

According to Forest Service, the cutting on New Hampshire's Mount Tecumseh is illegal, and is considered vandalism to National Forest land. As far as I know, Forest Service's law enforcement division is still actively investigating the cutting. For my involvement, as a photographer, I have been unofficially volunteering my time to document the cutting. I am against this type of vandalism, and report any findings to Forest Service.

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2016 Autumn Season, White Mountains

Reflection of autumn foliage on Mount Deception in a small pond along Old Cherry Mountain Road in Carroll, New Hampshire USA during the autumn months.
Old Cherry Mountain Road – Carroll, New Hampshire
 

2016 Autumn Season, White Mountains – Today’s blog article is just a quick update on the autumn foliage here in the New Hampshire White Mountains. As the autumn season approached this year, some weather gurus were suggesting that it could be an off year for foliage in New England. Though the foliage seems to be behind this year in the White Mountains, this autumn season has turned out to be an excellent one. The foliage is incredible this year!

I have spent most of this week (October 3-7) in the field photographing the autumn foliage. Many areas in the White Mountains region, such as Carroll, Crawford Notch, Pinkham Notch, and the Zealand area are at peak right now. Franconia Notch and the Kancamagus Scenic Byway are also looking excellent. The real surprise this year is how vibrant the colors are. The reds are dominating most of the landscape.

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Autumn Foliage, Lakes & Ponds

Lakes & ponds of New Hampshire. Lonesome Lake from Hi-Cannon Trail. This trail leads to the summit of Cannon Mountain in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Lonesome Lake – Franconia Notch State Park, New Hampshire
 

Autumn Foliage, Lakes & Ponds – As I wait for the autumn foliage season to begin, I can’t help but wonder if the 2016 foliage season is going to be a short one here in the New Hampshire White Mountains. The weather gurus are indicating that this is going to be an off year. But a short foliage season is better than no foliage season at all.

For me, the classic autumn scene includes brilliant foliage, water, and a mountain. And though this combination of subject matter is throughout the White Mountains, getting all three in perfect conditions is a challenge. Here are a few lakes and ponds in the New Hampshire White Mountains that are worth visiting. Some of these lakes and ponds are roadside, while others are off the beaten path and require hiking.

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Cascades on Cold Brook

Memorial Bridge along the Link Trail in Randolph, New Hampshire. Built in the 1920s this stone bridge is a dedication to all the early pathmakers.
Memorial Bridge (Cold Brook) – Randolph, New Hampshire
 

Cascades on Cold Brook, White Mountains – Cold Brook begins in King Ravine in the township of Low and Burbank's Grant and empties into the Moose River in Randolph. The 1908 map of the Northern Peaks of the Great Range and their Vicinity by Louis F. Cutter shows eleven marked cascades on Cold Brook. In the present day, the 9th edition of Randolph Paths states there are ten cascades on this brook.

Because of the minor discrepancy on the number of cascades, I based my work on the 1908 Louis Cutter map, which surprisingly is very accurate. I also referred to old A.M.C. White Mountain guidebooks. Out of the eleven cascades on Cold Brook, five of them are named. Two are known, Cold Brook Fall and Mossy Fall and the other three, Secunda Cascade, Tertia Cascade and Quarta Cascade have been forgotten over time.

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Waterfalls on Snyder Brook

View up Snyder Brook Valley toward Mount Madison and Mount Adams from the Inlook Trail in Randolph, New Hampshire during the summer months. This trail leads to Dome Rock.
Snyder Brook Valley From The Inlook Trail – Randolph, New Hampshire
 

Waterfalls on Snyder Brook, White Mountains – Located in the New Hampshire town of Randolph and the township of Low and Burbank's Grant Snyder Brook is a photographer’s and waterfall enthusiasts paradise. The lower portion of Snyder Brook is within the thirty-six acre Snyder Brook Scenic Area, which contains an impressive stand of old growth hemlock and red spruce.

In September of 1875 William G. Nowell, a 19th century trail builder, named Snyder Brook after Charles E. Lowe’s dog (ref: 1915 Appalachia Vol.13). Lowe was also a 19th century trail builder and mountain guide. Lowe and Nowell are credited for building Lowe’s Path in 1875-1876, one of the oldest trails in continuous use in the White Mountains. An 1896 map of Randolph indicates that Snyder Brook was once known as Salmacis Brook.

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