Posts Tagged: new england



September History, White Mountains

September history, Ordination Rock in Tamworth, New Hampshire. This is where the Rev. Parson Samuel Hidden was ordained on September 12, 1792 and became the first settled minister in Tamworth.
Ordination Rock – Tamworth, New Hampshire
 

September History, White Mountains – When it comes to White Mountains history, two significant events took place in September. One event took place took along Route 3 near Lincoln on a September night in 1961. And the second event, which happened in 1964, involves President Lyndon Johnson making conservation history. Included here are a few more interesting events.

Ordination Rock in Tamworth is where Rev. Parson Samuel Hidden was ordained on September 12, 1792, and became the first settled minister in Tamworth. He is buried in the cemetery located next to Ordination Rock.

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August History, White Mountains

August history, Willey Boulders in Crawford Notch State Park in Hart’s Location, New Hampshire. These boulders saved the Willey House from destruction on August 28, 1826 when a massive landslide came down Mount Willey.
Willey Boulders – Crawford Notch, New Hampshire
 

August History, White Mountains – When it comes to White Mountains history, some interesting events happened during August. Landslides in 1885 changed the landscape of Mount Tripyramid, fire destroyed Woodstock Lumber Company’s huge mill complex in 1913, and a grand resort (Profile House) burned down in 1923. But this is just the beginning. Included here are a few more interesting events.

On August 28, 1826, the "Willey Boulders" in Crawford Notch saved the Willey House from destruction when a massive landslide came down Mount Willey. These boulders located just above the house caused the landslide to split into two debris flows around the house. The house was said to be untouched, but all seven members of the family and two hired men perished in the slide while trying to escape to a safe area.

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July History, White Mountains

July history, Middle Sister Fire tower on Middle Sister Mountain in Albany, New Hampshire USA during a summer night. This fire tower was in operation from 1927-1948.
Middle Sister Mountain – Albany, New Hampshire
 

July History, White Mountains – July in the New Hampshire White Mountains is a great time of year. Hikers are exploring the trails, fishermen are fishing the rivers, and campers are enjoying the campgrounds. Throughout the history of the White Mountains, outdoor recreation has been a favorite pastime for many families during this month. And some interesting historical events took place during July.

Named for Matthew Thornton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, the town of Thornton was granted to Matthew Thornton and others on July 6, 1763. The charter consisted of 23,000 acres divided into seventy-three shares. However, no settlements were made under the original grant, and a new charter was given in October 1768. But because of slow development, the town would not be officially incorporated until November 1781.

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June History, White Mountains

June history, Frankenstein Trestle along the old Maine Central Railroad in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Frankenstein Trestle – Original Trestle Completed June 1875
 

June History, White Mountains – Many photographers love visiting the New Hampshire White Mountains during June. This time of year, the subject matter is endless, and photographers can shoot from sunrise to sunset. And with Covid restrictions being eased, the region will be filled with busy photographers this month. If there is one drawback, it’s the bugs. They can be awful this time of year!

Throughout the history of the White Mountains, there is not one significant historical event that dominates the month of June. However, many smaller events happened. A railroad trestle was completed, a turnpike opened for business, thousands of acres were granted, and a one of a kind railroad was incorporated. Included here are a few interesting June events.

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May History, White Mountains

May history, East Branch of the Pemigewasset River in Lincoln, New Hampshire USA during the spring months.
East Branch of the Pemigewasset River – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

May History, White Mountains – Throughout the years, a number of historical events in the White Mountains happened in May. One event that took place over one hundred years ago still benefits us today, and New Hampshire lost an icon during this month in 2003. Included here are a few interesting May events.

The most significant event took place on May 16, 1918. On this day, President Woodrow Wilson signed Executive Order 1449 creating the White Mountain National Forest in Maine and New Hampshire. Consisting of nearly 800,000 acres, the White Mountain National Forest attracts millions of visitors every year.

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Picking Up Trash, White Mountains

Picking up trash, artifacts (horseshoes) at an old logging camp along the abandoned Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad in Livermore, New Hampshire
Protected Artifacts – Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad (1909-1914)
 

Picking Up Trash, White Mountains – During this covid pandemic, many hikers have been picking up trash along the trail system here in the White Mountains. And there also has been an increase in hiker organized clean-up days, which is awesome. The easiest way for hikers to “give back” is to pick up trash along the trails.

However, it’s not widely known that the trail system is a portal to the White Mountains' fascinating past. Many trails utilize old railroad beds, pass through abandoned farm settlements and logging camps, and are links to important historical sites. And because of this, historical artifacts are scattered along many of the trails.

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Happy Earth Day 2021, New Hampshire

Earth Day, a small cascade on a tributary of Lost River in Kinsman Notch in North Woodstock, New Hampshire during the spring months.
Tributary of Lost River – Kinsman Notch, New Hampshire
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2021 – Happy Earth Day from the New Hampshire White Mountains! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here. In the 21st-century, it is essential that we understand the impact we have on the environment. Education and proper training can help control the problem.

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April History, White Mountains

White Mountains, April history; moonrise behind Mount Eisenhower in the White Mountains of New Hampshire USA during the spring months.
Mount Eisenhower Moonrise (April, 2015) – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

April History, White Mountains – When it comes to the history of the New Hampshire White Mountains, like March, so many historical events took place throughout the years during the month of April that listing all of them isn’t possible. So included here are just a few interesting historical events.

The first reference is for the hikers. In April 1863, Professor Albert Hopkins, a professor at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts, founded the Alpine Club of Williamstown. Recognized by most as the first hiking club in America, the club remained active only until 1865, but they did hike in the White Mountains.

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