Posts Tagged: new england



Definition of Wilderness, White Mountains

Definition of Wilderness, Owls Head from the Franconia Ridge Trail (Appalachian Trail), near Little Haystack Mountain, in the White Mountains of New Hampshire during the last days of summer.
Owls Head – Pemigewasset Wilderness, New Hampshire
 

Definition of Wilderness, White Mountains – I am currently working on a project that has brought me back into the Pemigewasset Wilderness. This wilderness is governed under the National Wilderness Preservation System and the Wilderness Act of 1964. And because it is designated wilderness, it has the highest level of protection for federal lands. The recreational opportunities, historical value, and educational platform the Pemigewasset Wilderness offers will educate outdoor enthusiasts for many years to come. It is important that visitors to the region know that the six designated wilderness areas in the White Mountain National Forest are managed differently than the rest of the National Forest. This is where the Wilderness Act comes into play.

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Beaver Brook Cascades, Kinsman Notch

Beaver Brook Cascades on Beaver Brook in Kinsman Notch of the New Hampshire White Mountains on a rainy spring day. The Appalachian Tail passes by these cascades.
Beaver Brook Cascades – Kinsman Notch, New Hampshire
 

Beaver Brook Cascades, Kinsman Notch – When it comes to waterfalls in the New Hampshire White Mountains, the waterfalls in Kinsman Notch are often overlooked. I can only guess Kinsman Notch’s reputation of having rough terrain is what keeps most away from exploring this incredible Notch.

Kinsman Notch has a number of named and unmanned waterfalls, and one of the better known ones is Beaver Brook Cascades. These cascades are located on Beaver Brook, and the Appalachian Trail (Beaver Brook Trail) runs on the side of them. The earliest reference I have found to them is from the 1890s.

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The Forgotten White Mountains

Photos showing the forgotten White Mountains. Mount Washington from the summit of Mount Jefferson in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA  during the summer months.
Mount Washington – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

The Forgotten White Mountains – When most think about the New Hampshire White Mountains, the beauty of the region first comes to mind. The mighty Mount Washington rules the Presidential Range and keeps visitors of the area busy for hours. And during the winter months, ski areas offer an unforgettable view of the mountains blanketed in snow. The White Mountains are an outdoor lover’s paradise.

What I just described is tourism (camping, fishing, hiking, skiing, etc.) and it has been a big part of the White Mountains since the early days. And it has been said the historic August 1826 Willey landslide tragedy in Crawford Notch had a connection to the rise of tourism in America. Now in the 21st century, historical sites are of great interest to many, so today I am going to share a few photos of the forgotten White Mountains.

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Trail Blazing, Trail Stewardship

A properly applied trail blaze along the Artist's Bluff Path in  White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Proper Trail Blaze – Artist's Bluff Path, New Hampshire
 

Trail Blazing, Trail Stewardship – I have been hearing more and more complaints about trail blazing along the White Mountains trail system. Either the trail is excessively blazed or not blazed enough. Personally, I don’t mind the trails that have little trail blazing. But I am not a fan of the excessive trail blazing. Over the years I have photographed different types of blazing styles and today I going to share a few of them with you.

Proper trail blazing protocol seems to vary among the trail maintenance organizations, but the ending result is the same. And most of these organizations agree that a standard trail blaze is a two inch by six inch rectangle placed about head height on trees. No painting of arrows, only a single vertical blaze, should be painted on a tree. For more information on blazing see the Randolph Mountain Club’s trail blazing protocol page.

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Happy Earth Day 2017, New Hampshire

Happy Earth Day! Sunset along the Appalachian Trail (Gulfside Trail) near Mount Clay in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA during the summer months.
Sunset – Gulfside Trail, White Mountains
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2017 – Happy Earth Day from New Hampshire! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here.

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East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Trestle 7

Foot bridge along the Lincoln Woods Trail which crosses Franconia Brook in Lincoln, New Hampshire. Hikers enter into the Pemigewasset Wilderness on the righthand side of this bridge. Old abutments from Trestle 7 of the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948) are used to support this foot bridge.
East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Trestle 7 (Franconia Brook )
 

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Trestle 7 – During the days of the East Branch & Lincoln (EB&L) Railroad, there were two trestles built at this crossing of Franconia Brook (above). And each trestle serviced different areas of today’s Pemigewasset Wilderness. The first trestle built serviced the Franconia Brook and Lincoln Brook Valleys. And the second trestle, built just below the first one, serviced the area surrounding the East and North Fork branches of the Pemigewasset River.

Trestle 7 is different than most trestles along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad because part of it is still in use today. No log trains pass over it anymore, but hikers use it on a regular basis.

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