Posts Tagged: new hampshire



June History, White Mountains

June history, Frankenstein Trestle along the old Maine Central Railroad in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Frankenstein Trestle – Original Trestle Completed June 1875
 

June History, White Mountains – Many photographers love visiting the New Hampshire White Mountains during June. This time of year, the subject matter is endless, and photographers can shoot from sunrise to sunset. And with Covid restrictions being eased, the region will be filled with busy photographers this month. If there is one drawback, it’s the bugs. They can be awful this time of year!

Throughout the history of the White Mountains, there is not one significant historical event that dominates the month of June. However, many smaller events happened. A railroad trestle was completed, a turnpike opened for business, thousands of acres were granted, and a one of a kind railroad was incorporated. Included here are a few interesting June events.

Continue reading right arrow

May History, White Mountains

May history, East Branch of the Pemigewasset River in Lincoln, New Hampshire USA during the spring months.
East Branch of the Pemigewasset River – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

May History, White Mountains – Throughout the years, a number of historical events in the White Mountains happened in May. One event that took place over one hundred years ago still benefits us today, and New Hampshire lost an icon during this month in 2003. Included here are a few interesting May events.

The most significant event took place on May 16, 1918. On this day, President Woodrow Wilson signed Executive Order 1449 creating the White Mountain National Forest in Maine and New Hampshire. Consisting of nearly 800,000 acres, the White Mountain National Forest attracts millions of visitors every year.

Continue reading right arrow

Picking Up Trash, White Mountains

Picking up trash, artifacts (horseshoes) at an old logging camp along the abandoned Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad in Livermore, New Hampshire
Protected Artifacts – Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad (1909-1914)
 

Picking Up Trash, White Mountains – During this covid pandemic, many hikers have been picking up trash along the trail system here in the White Mountains. And there also has been an increase in hiker organized clean-up days, which is awesome. The easiest way for hikers to “give back” is to pick up trash along the trails.

However, it’s not widely known that the trail system is a portal to the White Mountains' fascinating past. Many trails utilize old railroad beds, pass through abandoned farm settlements and logging camps, and are links to important historical sites. And because of this, historical artifacts are scattered along many of the trails.

Continue reading right arrow

Happy Earth Day 2021, New Hampshire

Earth Day, a small cascade on a tributary of Lost River in Kinsman Notch in North Woodstock, New Hampshire during the spring months.
Tributary of Lost River – Kinsman Notch, New Hampshire
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2021 – Happy Earth Day from the New Hampshire White Mountains! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here. In the 21st-century, it is essential that we understand the impact we have on the environment. Education and proper training can help control the problem.

Continue reading right arrow

April History, White Mountains

White Mountains, April history; moonrise behind Mount Eisenhower in the White Mountains of New Hampshire USA during the spring months.
Mount Eisenhower Moonrise (April, 2015) – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

April History, White Mountains – When it comes to the history of the New Hampshire White Mountains, like March, so many historical events took place throughout the years during the month of April that listing all of them isn’t possible. So included here are just a few interesting historical events.

The first reference is for the hikers. In April 1863, Professor Albert Hopkins, a professor at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts, founded the Alpine Club of Williamstown. Recognized by most as the first hiking club in America, the club remained active only until 1865, but they did hike in the White Mountains.

Continue reading right arrow

February History, White Mountains

White Mountains, February history; a winter hiker ascending the Air Line Trail in extreme weather conditions in the White Mountains, New Hampshire
Air Line Trail – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

February History, White Mountains – The history of the New Hampshire White Mountains can be looked at from many different perspectives. One of the more interesting ways to look at it is from a monthly viewpoint.

From a historical point of view, February is a deadly month in the White Mountains. Throughout the years, avalanches, climbing falls, hypothermia, and skiing accidents have taken a number of lives during this month. Most of these incidents have been well documented, so below are a few not so well known events that happened during the month of February.

Continue reading right arrow

Weeks State Park, New Hampshire

Weeks State Park - John Wingate Weeks Estate on the summit of Mt. Prospect in Lancaster, New Hampshire USA. The Mount Prospect Tower was built by John W. Weeks in 1912 and is still in operation today.
Weeks State Park – Lancaster, New Hampshire 
 

Weeks State Park, New Hampshire – Weeks State Park is a 420-acre, more or less, property on Mt. Prospect in Lancaster, New Hampshire. The main attraction of the park is the historical Weeks Estate on the summit. Built in 1912 for John Wingate Weeks (1860-1926), the main house is built of fieldstone and stucco.

Born in Lancaster on April 11, 1860, John Wingate Weeks was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts. He was a leading conservationist, congressman, senator, and secretary of war but is best known for the Weeks Act of 1911. The Weeks Act authorized the Federal Government to purchase private land in the eastern United States and maintain the land as national forests. He is the reason why we have the White Mountain National Forest.

Continue reading right arrow