Posts Tagged: new hampshire



East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Utility Poles

Artifact (utility pole) in the area of Camp 17 along the old East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948 in Lincoln, New Hampshire.
East Branch & Lincoln RR – Standing Utility Pole, Camp 17 Area
 

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Utility Poles – Telephone wires were strung from utility poles along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad to the numerous logging camps. In some areas along the railroad, side mounted wooden telephone peg holder pins nailed directly to trees were used in place of utility poles. Today, these utility poles are considered artifacts of the White Mountains logging era.

While this blog article focuses only on the abandoned East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, other logging railroads in the White Mountains used the same approach described above. And remnants of utility poles can still be found along some of the other railroads. However, as nature slowly reclaims the East Branch & Lincoln territory, standing utility poles are becoming a rarity.

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Sanders Bridge, Randolph Path

Sanders Bridge along the Randolph Path in Low and Burbank's Grant, New Hampshire during the summer months.
Sanders Bridge (2006) – Randolph Path, White Mountains
 

Sanders Bridge, Randolph Path – The Sanders Bridge crosses Cold Brook along the Randolph Path in Low and Burbank's Grant, New Hampshire. It is a memorial to Miriam Sanders, who was treasurer of the Randolph Mountain Club (RMC) for many years. The RMC maintains this rustic looking wooden bridge.

Originally built in 1976, the Sanders Bridge has had repairs over the years. In 2017, when the RMC did repairs to it, students from Burke Mountain Academy transported materials to the bridge site. If you have spent any time on the trail system in the Northern Presidential Range, you are likely aware of the RMC and their dedication to conserving the trails that they maintain.

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Happy Earth Day 2020, New Hampshire

Agassiz Basin, on Mossilauke Brook, in North Woodstock, New Hampshire on a foggy autumn day. Agassiz Basin is named for Swiss naturalist, Louis Agassiz (1807-1873), who visited the region while doing research in the 1800s.
Agassiz Basin – North Woodstock, New Hampshire
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2020 – Happy Earth Day from the New Hampshire White Mountains! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment. This year marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here. In the 21st-century, it is essential that we understand the impact we have on the environment. Education and proper training can help control the problem.

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Trailside History, White Mountains

Trailside history, a lone hiker traveling south along the Appalachian Trail (Franconia Ridge Trail) in the New Hampshire White Mountains during the winter months. Mount Lincoln is in the background.
Franconia Ridge Trail (2008) – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Trailside History, White Mountains – The history of the trail system in the New Hampshire White Mountains is amazing; early 19th-century trail builders are true legends of the White Mountains, and they are forever implanted into the history books. Trails built in the 1800s, such as Crawford Path, Davis Path, and Lowe’s Path, are still in use today. And while the building of hiking trails is a great topic, there are also many interesting features along the trails.

Trailside features such as Cow Cave, Gibbs Brook dam, Walton’s Cascade, and the many abandoned cellar holes along the trail system have some intriguing history attached to them, but they are often unnoticed by today’s hikers. So this blog article focuses on a few trailside features.

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Memorial Bridge, Randolph

Memorial Bridge, which crosses Cold Brook, along the Link Trail in Randolph, New Hampshire. Built in the 1920s this stone bridge is a dedication to all the early pathmakers.
Memorial Bridge, The Link – Randolph, New Hampshire
 

Memorial Bridge, Randolph – Built 1923-1924, Memorial Bridge crosses Cold Brook along “The Link” trail in Randolph, New Hampshire. The bridge was dedicated as a memorial to Randolph's early pathmakers (19th-century trail builders) on August 23, 1924. These early pathmakers are responsible for cutting many of the trails in the Northern Presidential Range.

Louis F. Cutter and Eldredge H. Blood designed and built the bridge. Work began on it in the fall of 1923 and was completed in time for the August 1924 dedication. The span of the bridge is about 26 feet, and it's built of concrete, logs, stone, and supported by a copper-clad log that is said to be over 5 feet in circumference. And the entrances were intentionally kept narrow to prevent horses and cattle from using it.

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Abandoned Mills, White Mountains

Abandoned Mills, remnants of the Lincoln mill and East Branch & Lincoln Railroad era in Lincoln, New Hampshire. This circular saw mill blade is a protected artifact from the logging railroad and mill era.
Lincoln Mill Era – Lincoln, New Hampshire
 

Abandoned Mills, White Mountains – During the 1800s and early 1900s, cut-up mills, grist mills, sawmills, and various other types of mills were found throughout New Hampshire. And because of the abundance of water in the White Mountains, there was no shortage of water-powered mills in the region. This blog article showcases a handful of the abandoned mills in the White Mountains.

Because most of these abandoned mills are within the White Mountain National Forest, keep in mind the removal of historical artifacts from federal lands without a permit is a violation of federal law. And you can’t dig for artifacts at historical sites which means metal detecting anywhere in the National Forest is asking for trouble. Take only pictures and leave these unique places the way you found them.

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2019 Year in Review, White Mountains

Black Mountain from along the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River, near the Loon Mtn. bridge, in Lincoln, New Hampshire at sunrise on an autumn day.
Black Mountain at Sunrise – Lincoln, New Hampshire
 

2019 Year in Review, White Mountains – Another year is coming to an end! For the past few years, I have been posting my "ten favorite images of the year" at the end of the year. But I drifted away from this format last year, and I am going to do it again this year. While we all love viewing imagery of the White Mountains, the “my top 10 favorite photos of the year" blog articles have become to repetitive for me. So its time for a change.

This year I found myself thinking about how the White Mountains have changed my life. Like many of you, I am drawn to these mountains, and at this point in my life, I can’t imagine living anywhere else. But I realized that it wasn't just the mountains, photography has been a huge influence in my life. Photography has made me care about conservation, historic preservation, and the environment. The camera has taught me more about life than I think I will ever realize.

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