Posts Tagged: presidential range



Presidential Range, Random History

Presidential Range from Eisenhower Wayside Park along Route 302 in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. Mount Washington is off in the distance snow-capped.
Presidential Range – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Presidential Range, Random History – The Presidential Range in the New Hampshire White Mountains is known worldwide for having some of the worst weather in the world. And the main attraction of the range is the mighty Mount Washington. At 6,288 feet, Mount Washington is the highest peak in the Northeastern United States. And with the famed Appalachian Trail traveling through this scenic mountain range, it is a busy area.

The first recorded ascent, Darby Field in 1642, and fatality, Frederick Strickland in 1849, on Mount Washington has been well-publicized and is known among outdoor enthusiasts who play in the White Mountains. And because of the significance of these events, some of the history surrounding the Presidential Range is overlooked. So included here are a few tidbits of history about this fascinating mountain range.

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Cold Brook Cascades, White Mountains

Memorial Bridge along the Link Trail in Randolph, New Hampshire. Built in the 1920s this stone bridge is a dedication to all the early pathmakers.
Memorial Bridge (Cold Brook) – Randolph, New Hampshire
 

Cold Brook Cascades, White Mountains – Cold Brook begins in King Ravine in the township of Low and Burbank's Grant and empties into the Moose River in Randolph. The 1908 map of the Northern Peaks of the Great Range and their Vicinity by Louis F. Cutter shows eleven marked cascades on Cold Brook. In the present day, the 9th edition of Randolph Paths states there are ten cascades on this brook.

Because of the minor discrepancy on the number of cascades, I based my work on the 1908 Louis Cutter map, which surprisingly is very accurate. I also referred to old A.M.C. White Mountain guidebooks. Out of the eleven cascades on Cold Brook, five of them are named. Two are known, Cold Brook Fall and Mossy Fall and the other three, Secunda Cascade, Tertia Cascade and Quarta Cascade have been forgotten over time.

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Snyder Brook Waterfalls, White Mountains

View up Snyder Brook Valley toward Mount Madison and Mount Adams from the Inlook Trail in Randolph, New Hampshire during the summer months. This trail leads to Dome Rock.
Snyder Brook Valley From The Inlook Trail – Randolph, New Hampshire
 

Snyder Brook Waterfalls, White Mountains – Located in the New Hampshire town of Randolph and the township of Low and Burbank's Grant Snyder Brook is a photographer’s and waterfall enthusiasts paradise. The lower portion of Snyder Brook is within the thirty-six acre Snyder Brook Scenic Area, which contains an impressive stand of old growth hemlock and red spruce.

In September of 1875 William G. Nowell, a 19th century trail builder, named Snyder Brook after Charles E. Lowe’s dog (ref: 1915 Appalachia Vol.13). Lowe was also a 19th century trail builder and mountain guide. Lowe and Nowell are credited for building Lowe’s Path in 1875-1876, one of the oldest trails in continuous use in the White Mountains. An 1896 map of Randolph indicates that Snyder Brook was once known as Salmacis Brook.

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Mountain Landscapes, Presidential Range

Appalachian Trail - Hiking on Crawford Path in the Presidential Range, which is  located in the White Mountain National Forest of New Hampshire USA. Mount Washington is in cloud cover.
Crawford Path – Mt Washington, New Hampshire
 

Mountain Landscapes, Presidential Range – Today, I am going to share with you landscape scenes from along the Appalachian Trail (AT) corridor in the Presidential Range of the New Hampshire White Mountains. I think its safe to say there is no other place in New England like the Presidential Range.

All of the images included in this blog article are from my medium format days (film), a time when photography was a much slower process. During the film days, I only had 15 shots to create a pleasing photo, and I wouldn’t know if I was successful at it until weeks later after the film was developed. I can’t help but reminisce about how different the photography industry is now than it was fifteen plus years ago.

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Mount Pierce, Great Place To Start

The Presidential Range from Mount Pierce  – White Mountains, NH 
 

Mount Pierce, Great Place To Start – One of the easier and best "bang for your buck" hikes in the White Mountains of New Hampshire is Mount Pierce. You get alpine expose and beautiful views of the Presidential Range. All with the option of being able to retreat to the cover of the forest quickly. Very little of this hike is exposed, which makes it great training for hikers new to winter hiking. It is also a great area to practice using your camera in alpine conditions.

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Winter Hiking Safety and Photography

Appalachian Trail - Half moon at dawn from the summit of Mount Pierce in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Mt Pierce at dawn – White Mountains, NH 
 

Winter Hiking Safety and Photography – One winter, before sunrise, I was setup near the summit of Mt Pierce in the New Hampshire White Mountains photographing the moon. It was a perfect morning to be on the ridge with the temperature around 10 degrees.

As I was doing this, I watched a hiker come up out of the brush on the east / southeastern side of Mt Pierce. He was completely off track, and not on the trail. It caught me by surprise because the southeastern side of the mountain is not the best place to be during the winter months.

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The Perch Shelter, White Mountains

The Perch Shelter is located along Perch Path in Cascade  Ravine just off the Randolph Path and Israel Ridge Path in the Northern Presidential Range, which is located in the White Mountain National Forest of New Hampshire.
The Perch Shelter – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

The Perch Shelter, White Mountains – The Perch Shelter is located along Perch Path in Cascade Ravine just off Randolph Path and Israel Ridge Path in the Presidential Range in the White Mountains, New Hampshire. Four tent platforms are also located at the Perch Shelter site.

Originally a birch bark building, the Perch Shelter dates back to the 1890s (around 1892) when J. Rayner Edmands built three camps in Cascade Ravine; Cascade Camp, Cliff Shelter, and the Perch Shelter. It has been renovated numerous times over the years, and the above photo shows how the shelter looked before the Randolph Mountain Club (RMC) renovated it in July / August 2010.

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