Posts Tagged: state park system



Cannon Mountain, Franconia Notch

Franconia Notch State Park - Cannon Mountain during the late autumn months in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Cannon Mountain from Artist Bluff – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Cannon Mountain, Franconia Notch State Park – Located just south of Bald Mountain in Franconia, New Hampshire, which I wrote about last week, is the centerpiece of Franconia Notch State Park, the state-owned Cannon Mountain ski area. Franconia Notch State Park would be much different today if Cannon Mountain wasn't included in a land purchase back in the 1920s. Rich with ski history, Cannon offers world-class skiing.

Did you know that the 6,440-acre Franconia Notch State Park, which includes Cannon Mountain, was privately owned up until the 1920s? The Profile and Flume Hotel Company owned most of it. The Flume House was located in the southern section of Franconia Notch and wasn't rebuilt when it burned down in 1918. And the Profile House was located in the northern section of Franconia Notch, and it burnt down in August of 1923. Each of these grand hotels lasted for about 70 years.

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Bald Mountain, Franconia Notch State Park

A hiker on the summit of Bald Mountain in the New Hampshire White Mountains. Franconia Notch is in the background.
Franconia Notch from Bald Mountain – Franconia, New Hampshire
 

Bald Mountain, Franconia Notch State Park – Located a short distance from Echo Lake, which I wrote about last week, in Franconia, New Hampshire is another great location where photographers will have no problem creating images. Even though some hiking has to be done to reach the summit of Bald Mountain the views of Franconia Notch are worth the short hike.

Back in the 1800’s a carriage road lead to just below the summit of Bald Mountain. The 1859 second edition, of “The White Mountain Guide Book” (Eastman's White Mountain Guide) references that a carriage road had been built the “present season” from the highway, north of the Profile House, to the summit of Bald Mountain. The same description also states that the mountain had been little visited up until that point.

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