Posts Tagged: stewardship



2020 Human Impact, White Mountains

2020 human impact, mask hanging from a tree along the Georgiana Falls Path in Lincoln, New Hampshire during the summer of 2020 (COVID-19 pandemic).
COVID-19 Pandemic – White Mountains, New Hampshire (Sept. 2020)
 

2020 Human Impact, White Mountains – During these strange times, like many of you, I have been trying to stay safe and worrying about family and friends. I also have watched the New Hampshire White Mountains get trashed over the last few months. While human impact (overuse) is not a new problem here in the White Mountains, it has gotten much worse during the Coronavirus pandemic.

Being a native of New Hampshire, I hate seeing the White Mountains being treated so poorly. I have never seen such a lack of respect for nature. However, overuse has been a problem throughout the history of the White Mountains. And with the surge in outdoor recreation in the 21st-century, this was bound to happen again. And even in today’s conservation minded-society, there is still no easy solution to the problem.

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Legitimate Flagging, White Mountains

Flagging and yellow blazing on birch tree along the Mount Tecumseh Trail in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. The Mt Tecumseh Trail is a perfect example – For a short time, a number of trees along the trail had unmarked survey flagging tape on them. These flagged trees were part of research being done by one of the local colleges. Once the field research was completed the flagging was removed. Mt Tecumseh Trail seems be the focal point of research because flagging is always on big and small trees along the trail.
Flagging on birch tree along Mt Tecumseh Trail
 

Legitimate Flagging (survey tape) – On a recent trail inspection with a Forest Service assistant district ranger, one topic of discussion was flagging tape on trees along the trail system of the White Mountains. I want to point out that some of the survey flagging tape you see along trails in the White Mountains marks trees that are being used for research. Much of this flagging has no identifying marks on it, and there is no way to determine its purpose. Once the research is finished, proper parties hike up the trail and remove the flagging.

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