Posts Tagged: trash



Picking Up Trash, White Mountains

Picking up trash, artifacts (horseshoes) at an old logging camp along the abandoned Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad in Livermore, New Hampshire
Protected Artifacts – Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad (1909-1914)
 

Picking Up Trash, White Mountains – During this covid pandemic, many hikers have been picking up trash along the trail system here in the White Mountains. And there also has been an increase in hiker organized clean-up days, which is awesome. The easiest way for hikers to “give back” is to pick up trash along the trails.

However, it’s not widely known that the trail system is a portal to the White Mountains' fascinating past. Many trails utilize old railroad beds, pass through abandoned farm settlements and logging camps, and are links to important historical sites. And because of this, historical artifacts are scattered along many of the trails.

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Vandalism, White Mountains

Beware of Vandalism sign in New Hampshire.
Beware of Vandalism – New Hampshire
 

Vandalism, White Mountains – I have been reminiscing about all the conversations I have had this year. And a common topic among many outdoor enthusiasts is all the vandalism in the White Mountains. So today’s blog article focuses on the keyword search term “vandalism”. And this imagery is intended to create awareness for a very concerning issue here in the New Hampshire White Mountains. However, keep in mind that some outdoor enthusiasts feel some of the below acts of vandalism are perfectly acceptable.

When creating awareness for the impact we have on the environment, the norm in today’s outdoor world is to use breathtaking landscape photos of a region. But as an environmental / conservation photographer, when creating awareness for the White Mountains environment, I prefer to use photos that show the impact. I believe showing the actual damage leaves a lasting impression on outdoor enthusiasts. And it influences us to practice “Leave No Trace” and be better stewards of the land.

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Human Impact, White Mountains

Impact photo of glass bottles thrown in the forest of Pawtuckaway State Park in Nottingham, New Hampshire.
Green Glass Bottles – New Hampshire
 

Human Impact, White Mountains – From a photographer’s point of view, I believe showing the ongoing human impact in the New Hampshire White Mountains creates awareness for what we are doing to our public lands. Overcrowding, vandalism, and litter is a huge problem.

Every day beautiful landscape photos of the New Hampshire White Mountains are posted on all the social networking websites, and this creates a false belief that the White Mountains are in a state of pristine condition. In life, and as an environmental photographer, I'm a realist, and I don’t believe in this fantasy world approach to conservation. Today, I am going to share with you a few unflattering images of the White Mountains. Out of the eleven scenes in this blog article, seven of them are linked to hiking.

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Campsite Trash, Kancamagus Scenic Byway

Poor leave no trace ethics on Fire road 511 along the Kancamagus Highway (route 112), which is one of New England's scenic byways in the White Mountains, New Hampshire. This road has many campgrounds but campers still prefer to camp off in the woods. Leaving a mess behind, like this, is not acceptable. People need to pick up their mess when they leave the forest.
Kancamagus Scenic Byway – Forest Road 511 Campsite (2011)
 

Campsite TrashKancamagus Scenic Byway – Admittedly the heat has taken its toll on me this week and I didn’t feel like doing anything today. My plans for the day were to walk up Forest Road 511 along the Kancamagus Scenic Byway in New Hampshire to finish photographing a hardwood forest I found a few months ago. There is a nice mix of hardwoods in this area. 

As I started walking up the Forest Road, I changed my plans and decided to pick up a mess left at a campsite along the Forest Road. The trash has been there a least a few months (maybe more), definitely abandoned. Most of it has been blowing around the area.

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