Posts Tagged: travel & tourism



July History, White Mountains

July history, Middle Sister Fire tower on Middle Sister Mountain in Albany, New Hampshire USA during a summer night. This fire tower was in operation from 1927-1948.
Middle Sister Mountain – Albany, New Hampshire
 

July History, White Mountains – July in the New Hampshire White Mountains is a great time of year. Hikers are exploring the trails, fishermen are fishing the rivers, and campers are enjoying the campgrounds. Throughout the history of the White Mountains, outdoor recreation has been a favorite pastime for many families during this month. And some interesting historical events took place during July.

Named for Matthew Thornton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, the town of Thornton was granted to Matthew Thornton and others on July 6, 1763. The charter consisted of 23,000 acres divided into seventy-three shares. However, no settlements were made under the original grant, and a new charter was given in October 1768. But because of slow development, the town would not be officially incorporated until November 1781.

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Weeks State Park, New Hampshire

Weeks State Park - John Wingate Weeks Estate on the summit of Mt. Prospect in Lancaster, New Hampshire USA. The Mount Prospect Tower was built by John W. Weeks in 1912 and is still in operation today.
Weeks State Park – Lancaster, New Hampshire 
 

Weeks State Park, New Hampshire – Weeks State Park is a 420-acre, more or less, property on Mt. Prospect in Lancaster, New Hampshire. The main attraction of the park is the historical Weeks Estate on the summit. Built in 1912 for John Wingate Weeks (1860-1926), the main house is built of fieldstone and stucco.

Born in Lancaster on April 11, 1860, John Wingate Weeks was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts. He was a leading conservationist, congressman, senator, and secretary of war but is best known for the Weeks Act of 1911. The Weeks Act authorized the Federal Government to purchase private land in the eastern United States and maintain the land as national forests. He is the reason why we have the White Mountain National Forest.

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2020 Year in Review, White Mountains

The Pemigewasset River near the Flume Visitor Center in Franconia Notch State Park in Lincoln, New Hampshire covered in snow on a cloudy autumn day.
Pemigewasset River – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

2020 Year in Review, White Mountains – As the year comes to an end, I am still trying to understand this pandemic. And I am also still trying to grasp how badly overrun the White Mountains have been this year. While there appears to be a vaccine for the virus, there is no immediate solution for the current human impact issue here in the White Mountains.

If you live in the White Mountains region, did you ever think the outdoor community would be fighting about the definition of “local” and vehicles at trailheads being vandalized just because they have out-of-state license plates? With social media fueling the fire, this year has been an awful display of what the White Mountains outdoor community is all about. For better or worse, social media has changed outdoor recreation.

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2019 White Mountains Calendar Season

Front cover of the 2019 scenic White Mountains, New Hampshire wall calendar by Erin Paul Donovan.
2019 White Mountains Wall Calendar Front Cover
 

2019 White Mountains Wall Calendar Season – As the month of September comes to an end its time to start thinking about buying a new 2019 wall calendar. And today, I want to share with you my New Hampshire White Mountains wall calendar, which showcases the majestic White Mountains region. This 12-month wall calendar is professional designed and printed. It measures 12” x 12" closed, and 12” x 24” when opened. The calendar also has a date grid for noting appointments, and includes holidays of major religions, phases of the moon, and sunrise and sunset times.

On the front cover (above) is Conway Scenic Railroad’s “Notch Train” crossing the historic Willey Brook Trestle along the old Maine Central Railroad in Crawford Notch. Crawford Notch is incredibly beautiful during the autumn foliage season. This scene of Crawford Notch also represents the month of October.

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Forgotten Lincoln, New Hampshire

RiverWalk Resort at Loon Mountain in Lincoln, New Hampshire during the autumn months. This resort occupies the site of the old mill complex that J.E Henry and Sons built in the early 1900s.
RiverWalk Resort – Village of Lincoln, New Hampshire
 

Forgotten Lincoln, New Hampshire – On January 31, 1764, Governor Benning Wentworth granted 24,000 acres of land to James Avery of Connecticut and others. Avery was also granted the town of Landaff on the same day. None of the grantees lived in Lincoln, and it is likely that they never visited the township. Lincoln was named after Henry Fiennes Pelham-Clinton, 2nd Duke of Newcastle, 9th Earl of Lincoln.

Per the charter, the grantees failed to settle the town in time. And in 1772 the Governor declared the Lincoln charter a forfeit and re-granted Lincoln, along with most of Franconia, to Sir Francis Bernard and others. The name of the new township was Morristown in honor of Corbin Morris, one of the grantees.

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Forgotten Woodstock, New Hampshire

Mirror Lake in New Hampshire during the summer months.
Mirror Lake – Woodstock, New Hampshire
 

Forgotten Woodstock, New Hampshire – Chartered in September 1763 by Governor Benning Wentworth, the town of Woodstock was first incorporated as Peeling. The charter, consisting of 25,000 acres, was granted to Eli Demerit and others and was divided into ninety-eight equal shares. In 1771, the land was regranted to Nathaniel Cushman and others and divided into seventy equal shares and renamed Fairfield. Then in 1773, it was regranted as Peeling back to some of the original proprietors. The name was changed to Woodstock in 1840.

Today the mountainous landscape of Woodstock is picture perfect. And the village of North Woodstock gets so much recognition that you would think North Woodstock received its own charter. But it didn’t and is part of the Woodstock charter. Much of the town's history is well known, but some of it has been forgotten. And this blog article focuses on a few of the forgotten historical features of Woodstock.

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Snow, White Mountains Weather

Snow scene along the Kancamagus Highway (route 112) in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA in blizzard conditions.
Kancamagus Scenic Byway – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Snow, White Mountains Weather – During the winter months, the New Hampshire White Mountains come to life. Skiers take to the ski resorts, snowmobilers ride the hundreds of miles of groomed trails, and hikers explore the snow-covered trails. Winters that produce lots of snow are good for the New Hampshire economy (tourism industry), while the winters that have little snowfall can be detrimental to the local economy.

My favorite time of year to shoot in the White Mountains is during the winter season. When covered in snow the landscape of the White Mountains is transformed into a peaceful winter wonderland. Included in this blog article are a few snow scenes that showcase the winter season.

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2018 White Mountains, NH Calendar

Front cover of the 2018 scenic White Mountains, New Hampshire wall calendar by ScenicNH Photography LLC | Erin Paul Donovan.
Front Cover – 2018 White Mountains Wall Calendar
 

2018 New Hampshire White Mountains Wall Calendar – It is calendar season! And today, I want to share with you the front and back covers of my scenic White Mountains calendar. This is a professional designed and printed 12-month calendar, and it measures 12” x 12" closed, and 12” x 24” when opened. It has a date grid for noting appointments, and also includes holidays of major religions, phases of the moon, and sunrise and sunset times. The calendar showcases the landscape of the New Hampshire White Mountains.

On the front cover (above) is Cherry Mountain from Moorhen Marsh. This view can be seen from along the Presidential Range Rail Trail at Pondicherry Wildlife Refuge. Pondicherry is an incredible place worth visiting at least once. Though close to civilization the refuge is very peaceful, and I visit it as much as psossible. Sunrise and sunset are great times to visit the area. This scene of Cherry Mountain also represents the month of June.

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