Posts Tagged: white mountain national forest



Forest Road Status, White Mountains

Forest Road Status; Haystack Road in the White Mountains, New Hampshire covered in snow during the winter months. This is a seasonal road closed during the snow season.
Haystack Road (winter) – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Forest Road Status, White Mountains – Here in the New Hampshire White Mountains, the U.S. Forest Service closes roads within the White Mountain National Forest throughout the year. These forest roads are closed for numerous reasons, and many are closed to vehicle traffic during the snow season. In the spring, after these seasonal roads have dried out and are passable, they are reopened to vehicle traffic. However, there is no exact date when any forest road will reopen.

Every spring, outdoor enthusiasts turn to social media and crowd-sourced websites to find out if any given forest road in the White Mountain National Forest is open, only to be given inaccurate information, a common problem with crowd-sourced websites and some social media outdoor pages.[1]

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Happy Earth Day 2022, New Hampshire

Happy Earth Day; Scarface Brook in Bethlehem, New Hampshire during the autumn months. This brook is a tributary of the South Branch of the Gale River
Scarface Brook – Bethlehem, New Hampshire
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2022 – Happy Earth Day from the New Hampshire White Mountains! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here. In the 21st-century, it is essential that we understand the impact we have on the environment. Education and proper training can help control the problem.

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Picking Up Trash, White Mountains

Picking up trash, artifacts (horseshoes) at an old logging camp along the abandoned Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad in Livermore, New Hampshire
Protected Artifacts – Woodstock & Thornton Gore Railroad (1909-1914)
 

Picking Up Trash, White Mountains – During this covid pandemic, many hikers have been picking up trash along the trail system here in the White Mountains. And there also has been an increase in hiker organized clean-up days, which is awesome. The easiest way for hikers to “give back” is to pick up trash along the trails.

However, it’s not widely known that the trail system is a portal to the White Mountains' fascinating past. Many trails utilize old railroad beds, pass through abandoned farm settlements and logging camps, and are links to important historical sites. And because of this, historical artifacts are scattered along many of the trails.

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Happy Earth Day 2021, New Hampshire

Earth Day, a small cascade on a tributary of Lost River in Kinsman Notch in North Woodstock, New Hampshire during the spring months.
Tributary of Lost River – Kinsman Notch, New Hampshire
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2021 – Happy Earth Day from the New Hampshire White Mountains! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here. In the 21st-century, it is essential that we understand the impact we have on the environment. Education and proper training can help control the problem.

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2020 Human Impact, White Mountains

2020 human impact, mask hanging from a tree along the Georgiana Falls Path in Lincoln, New Hampshire during the summer of 2020 (COVID-19 pandemic).
COVID-19 Pandemic – White Mountains, New Hampshire (Sept. 2020)
 

2020 Human Impact, White Mountains – During these strange times, like many of you, I have been trying to stay safe and worrying about family and friends. I also have watched the New Hampshire White Mountains get trashed over the last few months. While human impact (overuse) is not a new problem here in the White Mountains, it has gotten much worse during the Coronavirus pandemic.

Being a native of New Hampshire, I hate seeing the White Mountains being treated so poorly. I have never seen such a lack of respect for nature. However, overuse has been a problem throughout the history of the White Mountains. And with the surge in outdoor recreation in the 21st-century, this was bound to happen again. And even in today’s conservation minded-society, there is still no easy solution to the problem.

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Sanders Bridge, Randolph Path

Sanders Bridge along the Randolph Path in Low and Burbank's Grant, New Hampshire during the summer months.
Sanders Bridge (2006) – Randolph Path, White Mountains
 

Sanders Bridge, Randolph Path – The Sanders Bridge crosses Cold Brook along the Randolph Path in Low and Burbank's Grant, New Hampshire. It is a memorial to Miriam Sanders, who was treasurer of the Randolph Mountain Club (RMC) for many years. The RMC maintains this rustic looking wooden bridge.

Originally built in 1976, the Sanders Bridge has had repairs over the years. In 2017, when the RMC did repairs to it, students from Burke Mountain Academy transported materials to the bridge site. If you have spent any time on the trail system in the Northern Presidential Range, you are likely aware of the RMC and their dedication to conserving the trails that they maintain.

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Happy Earth Day 2020, New Hampshire

Agassiz Basin, on Mossilauke Brook, in North Woodstock, New Hampshire on a foggy autumn day. Agassiz Basin is named for Swiss naturalist, Louis Agassiz (1807-1873), who visited the region while doing research in the 1800s.
Agassiz Basin – North Woodstock, New Hampshire
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2020 – Happy Earth Day from the New Hampshire White Mountains! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment. This year marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here. In the 21st-century, it is essential that we understand the impact we have on the environment. Education and proper training can help control the problem.

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Trailside History, White Mountains

Trailside history, a lone hiker traveling south along the Appalachian Trail (Franconia Ridge Trail) in the New Hampshire White Mountains during the winter months. Mount Lincoln is in the background.
Franconia Ridge Trail (2008) – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Trailside History, White Mountains – The history of the trail system in the New Hampshire White Mountains is amazing; early 19th-century trail builders are true legends of the White Mountains, and they are forever implanted into the history books. Trails built in the 1800s, such as Crawford Path, Davis Path, and Lowe’s Path, are still in use today. And while the building of hiking trails is a great topic, there are also many interesting features along the trails.

Trailside features such as Cow Cave, Gibbs Brook dam, Walton’s Cascade, and the many abandoned cellar holes along the trail system have some intriguing history attached to them, but they are often unnoticed by today’s hikers. So this blog article focuses on a few trailside features.

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