Posts Tagged: white mountain national forest



Hand of Man in Nature

Hand of man scene. Mount Monroe with Mount Washington in the background from the Appalachian Trail in Sargent's Purchase, New Hampshire.
Mount Monroe – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Hand of Man in Nature – Last week I wrote about how some photographers believe that a true landscape or nature scene is a scene that is absent of all human elements. The scene itself showcases the pure beauty of nature. Well, the opposite of the pure nature scene is the hand of man scene, which includes human elements. Can you see the human element in the above scene?

I prefer to create images that include the hand of man only because they show the interaction we have with the environment. When some people hear the “hand of man” they think of the negative impact that we are doing to the environment. But in photography, the hand of man scene is not always focused on negative impact.

Continue reading right arrow

Pure Nature Scenes, White Mountains

Black Pond on the side of Black Pond Trail in Lincoln, New Hampshire. This forest was logged during the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad era, which as was a logging railroad in operation from 1893-1948.
Black Pond – Lincoln, New Hampshire
 

Pure Nature Scenes, White Mountains – In photography, many organizations and photographers consider a true nature scene to be a scene that is absent of any human elements. The scene itself showcases the pure beauty of nature. So keeping with the spirit of nature photography here are a few nature scenes that represent the New Hampshire White Mountains.

Admittedly, I prefer to include the hand of man in my images mainly because it shows our influence on nature. A pile of trash left in the middle of a pristine wilderness is the classic example. Of all the impact we do to nature, for some reason, trash upsets outdoor enthusiasts the most. But that is for another day today it is all about pure nature scenes.

Continue reading right arrow

Logging Era Artifacts, White Mountains

Logging era artifacts along the abandoned East Branch & Lincoln Logging Railroad in Lincoln, New Hampshire. This artifact is a Harp Switch Stand that has been abandoned deep in the forest.
East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Lincoln, New Hampshire
 

Logging Era Artifacts, White Mountains – Today’s blog article focuses on an image keyword search term. I chose the search term “logging era artifacts”, and searched my image archive to see what imagery I have available that represents the New Hampshire White Mountains logging era. The below commentary and imagery showcases this search term.

A major portion of the White Mountains history evolves around the late 19th and early 20th-century logging era, and pretty much in every corner of the White Mountains artifacts from the logging era can be found. And while some have no interest in the history of the White Mountains we all have to appreciate what came out of the logging era, the Weeks Act.

Continue reading right arrow

Human Impact, White Mountains

Impact photo of glass bottles thrown in the forest of Pawtuckaway State Park in Nottingham, New Hampshire.
Green Glass Bottles – New Hampshire
 

Human Impact, White Mountains – I usually write a few blog articles a year that are focused on the impact we have on the environment, and today is a good day for one. I have always felt that in order to get people to care more for the environment photographers have to show the impact that is happening in the world.

Every day beautiful landscape photos of the New Hampshire White Mountains are posted on all the social networking websites, and this creates a false belief that the White Mountains are in a state of pristine condition. In life, and as an environmental photographer, I'm a realist, and I don’t believe in this fantasy world approach to conservation. Today, I am going to share with you a few unflattering images of the White Mountains.

Continue reading right arrow

Ellen’s Falls, White Mountains

Ellens Falls are located on Hobbs Brook in Albany, New Hampshire.
Ellen's Falls (top section) – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Ellen's Falls, White Mountains – Ellen's Falls is a picturesque waterfall located on Hobbs Brook, about a mile upstream from its junction with the Kancamagus Highway in Albany, New Hampshire. And though I have read visiting these falls requires bushwhacking up the side of Hobbs Brook from the Kancamagus Highway, there is actually a gated Forest Road that can be used to reach the falls.

Hobbs Brook was probably named for one of Albany’s early settlers, Ruben Derban Hobbs who had a sawmill on the brook. But before Hobbs had his sawmill on the brook a man by the name of Ellen had a sawmill on the brook, and at the time locals referred to the brook as Ellen River. So it seems likely that Ellen’s Falls are named for him. At this point, I have found only one reference to Ellen.

Continue reading right arrow

Swift River Railroad, New Hampshire

Autumn foliage from the Boulder Loop Trail in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. The Boulder Loop Trail has excellent views of the Swift River Valley. During the autumn months is the best time to hike this trail.
Swift River Valley – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Swift River Railroad, New Hampshire – The Swift River Railroad was a logging railroad in the Swift River valley of the New Hampshire White Mountains. It was operated by the Conway Company and was in operation from 1906-1916. The railroad began in Conway, at the Conway Company’s sawmill, and traveled up the Swift River valley following the Swift River and much of today’s Kancamagus Scenic Byway. It ended somewhere beyond Pine Bend Brook, below Mount Kancamagus.

It is hard to envision the Swift River valley (above) stripped of its timber. But for ten years, this area was heavily logged which is only a part of the history surrounding this valley. To absorb all the history of this valley in one blog article may be overwhelming so I will briefly touch base on two other interesting features of this area.

Continue reading right arrow

Abandoned Elbow Pond Community

Elbow Pond during the summer months in Woodstock, New Hampshire. Species of fish in this pond include chain pickerel, yellow perch and smallmouth bass. This area was part of the Gordon Pond Railroad, which was a logging railroad in operation from 1905-1916.
Elbow Pond – Woodstock, New Hampshire
 

Abandoned Elbow Pond Community – A few years ago, I documented the abandoned Elbow Pond cabin community in Woodstock, New Hampshire. This small cabin community was in the area immediately surrounding Elbow Pond. And it shouldn't be confused with the nineteenth and early twentieth-century farming settlements or logging railroad that were once in the area.

Elbow Pond is located at the end of Elbow Pond Road, a seasonal dirt road off Route 118. It is considered to be a mid-sized pond with a maximum depth of around 32 feet. And species of fish found in the pond include chain pickerel, yellow perch, and smallmouth bass.

Continue reading right arrow