Posts Tagged: white mountains



Definition of Wilderness, White Mountains

Definition of Wilderness, Owls Head from the Franconia Ridge Trail (Appalachian Trail), near Little Haystack Mountain, in the White Mountains of New Hampshire during the last days of summer.
Owls Head – Pemigewasset Wilderness, New Hampshire
 

Definition of Wilderness, White Mountains – I am currently working on a project that has brought me back into the Pemigewasset Wilderness. This wilderness is governed under the National Wilderness Preservation System and the Wilderness Act of 1964. And because it is designated wilderness, it has the highest level of protection for federal lands. The recreational opportunities, historical value, and educational platform the Pemigewasset Wilderness offers will educate outdoor enthusiasts for many years to come. It is important that visitors to the region know that the six designated wilderness areas in the White Mountain National Forest are managed differently than the rest of the National Forest. This is where the Wilderness Act comes into play.

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Beaver Brook Cascades, Kinsman Notch

Beaver Brook Cascades on Beaver Brook in Kinsman Notch of the New Hampshire White Mountains on a rainy spring day. The Appalachian Tail passes by these cascades.
Beaver Brook Cascades – Kinsman Notch, New Hampshire
 

Beaver Brook Cascades, Kinsman Notch – When it comes to waterfalls in the New Hampshire White Mountains, the waterfalls in Kinsman Notch are often overlooked. I can only guess Kinsman Notch’s reputation of having rough terrain is what keeps most away from exploring this incredible Notch.

Kinsman Notch has a number of named and unmanned waterfalls, and one of the better known ones is Beaver Brook Cascades. These cascades are located on Beaver Brook, and the Appalachian Trail (Beaver Brook Trail) runs on the side of them. The earliest reference I have found to them is from the 1890s.

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The Forgotten White Mountains

Photos showing the forgotten White Mountains. Mount Washington from the summit of Mount Jefferson in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA  during the summer months.
Mount Washington – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

The Forgotten White Mountains – When most think about the New Hampshire White Mountains, the beauty of the region first comes to mind. The mighty Mount Washington rules the Presidential Range and keeps visitors of the area busy for hours. And during the winter months, ski areas offer an unforgettable view of the mountains blanketed in snow. The White Mountains are an outdoor lover’s paradise.

What I just described is tourism (camping, fishing, hiking, skiing, etc.) and it has been a big part of the White Mountains since the early days. And it has been said the historic August 1826 Willey landslide tragedy in Crawford Notch had a connection to the rise of tourism in America. Now in the 21st century, historical sites are of great interest to many, so today I am going to share a few photos of the forgotten White Mountains.

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National Trails Day, White Mountains

Group of hikers travel along the Tuckerman Crossover Trail in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA during the summer months. Mount Monroe is in the background.
Tuckerman Crossover – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

National Trails Day, White Mountains – Today is American Hiking Society’s National Trails Day, an annual event held on the first Saturday in June. And the intention of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for America's Trail system. It is also a day to recognize the work of all the volunteers who do trail maintenance along America’s trail system.

As environmental photographer and a hiker of the New Hampshire White Mountains, I appreciate all the work that volunteers do along the White Mountains trail system. And to all you adopt-a-trail volunteers, who are truly only volunteering to give back to the White Mountains, THANK YOU.

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Waterfalls on Cascade Brook, Franconia Notch

Cascade Brook in Lincoln, New Hampshire on a spring day. This brook is located along the Basin-Cascades Trail.
Cascade Brook – Basin-Cascades Trail, New Hampshire
 

Waterfalls on Cascade Brook, Franconia Notch Waterfall enthusiasts will love exploring Cascade Brook in Lincoln, New Hampshire. The Basin-Cascades Trail travels in the area of Cascade Brook. And for the most part, all of the cascades in this blog article are on the side of the trail. But they are not roadside, and one must hike up the Basin-Cascades Trail to reach them.

In the 1870s book, I Go A-fishing by William Cowper Prime, he describes Cascade Brook as being one of the finest brooks in America for scenery and small trout. In 1876, Mr. Prime and W.F. Bridge bought Moran Lake and the land around it. They renamed the lake “Lonesome Lake” and had a private cabin on it. And they spent time fishing on the brooks in the area. It is worth mentioning that in the early days Lonesome Lake was known as Tamarack Pond and Moran Lake.

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Trail Blazing, Trail Stewardship

A properly applied trail blaze along the Artist's Bluff Path in  White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Proper Trail Blaze – Artist's Bluff Path, New Hampshire
 

Trail Blazing, Trail Stewardship – I have been hearing more and more complaints about trail blazing along the White Mountains trail system. Either the trail is excessively blazed or not blazed enough. Personally, I don’t mind the trails that have little trail blazing. But I am not a fan of the excessive trail blazing. Over the years I have photographed different types of blazing styles and today I going to share a few of them with you.

Proper trail blazing protocol seems to vary among the trail maintenance organizations, but the ending result is the same. And most of these organizations agree that a standard trail blaze is a two inch by six inch rectangle placed about head height on trees. No painting of arrows, only a single vertical blaze, should be painted on a tree. For more information on blazing see the Randolph Mountain Club’s trail blazing protocol page.

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