Posts Tagged: white mountains



Hexacuba Shelter, Kodak Trail

Appalachian Trail (AT) - The Hexacuba Shelter is a six-sided hexagonal shelter on the south side of Mount Cube, just off the Kodak Trail (AT) in Orford, New Hampshire.
Hexacuba Shelter – Kodak Trail (AT), New Hampshire
 

Hexacuba Shelter, Kodak Trail – Built in 1989 by the Dartmouth Outing Club (DOC), the Hexacuba Shelter is a six-sided hexagonal log shelter that sleeps 8-10. It's located at 1,980 feet on the south side of Mount Cube on a spur path off the Kodak Trail, a segment of the Appalachian Trail, in Orford, New Hampshire.

Three trails lead to Mount Cube: the Kodak Trail, the Mt. Cube Trail, and the Cross Rivendell Trail. The Kodak Trail is the most scenic of the three; the trail was named this because it travels over Eastman Ledges, and there are numerous "Kodak moments" along the trail. The older generation may understand this connection better than the younger generation.

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Forest Road Status, White Mountains

Forest Road Status; Haystack Road in the White Mountains, New Hampshire covered in snow during the winter months. This is a seasonal road closed during the snow season.
Haystack Road (winter) – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Forest Road Status, White Mountains – Here in the New Hampshire White Mountains, the U.S. Forest Service closes roads within the White Mountain National Forest throughout the year. These forest roads are closed for numerous reasons, and many are closed to vehicle traffic during the snow season. In the spring, after these seasonal roads have dried out and are passable, they are reopened to vehicle traffic. However, there is no exact date when any forest road will reopen.

Every spring, outdoor enthusiasts turn to social media and crowd-sourced websites to find out if any given forest road in the White Mountain National Forest is open, only to be given inaccurate information, a common problem with crowd-sourced websites and some social media outdoor pages.[1]

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Happy Earth Day 2022, New Hampshire

Happy Earth Day; Scarface Brook in Bethlehem, New Hampshire during the autumn months. This brook is a tributary of the South Branch of the Gale River
Scarface Brook – Bethlehem, New Hampshire
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2022 – Happy Earth Day from the New Hampshire White Mountains! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here. In the 21st-century, it is essential that we understand the impact we have on the environment. Education and proper training can help control the problem.

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Cog Railway Hotel Proposal

Cog Railway, Mount Washington on the summit of Mount Washington in the White Mountains, New Hampshire. Completed in 1869, this three mile railroad leads to the summit of Mount Washington.
Mount Washington Cog Railway in the Alpine Zone, New Hampshire
 

Cog Railway Hotel Proposal, Mount Washington – The owner of the Mount Washington Cog Railway is again proposing a restaurant and hotel accommodations on New Hampshire's Mount Washington. However, this project is a little different than the 35-room hotel proposal he made a few years ago. The Cog Railway owns a 99-foot-wide strip of land that straddles the railroad from the Cog Railway Station to the summit of Mount Washington. These accommodations would be built within this strip of land, below the summit.

In the new proposal, 18 rail cars would be placed at 5,800 feet at a station from mid-May through mid-October. Some of the rail cars would be dining cars, and nine of them will be sleeper cars that can accommodate up to 70 guests. And because the station isn’t on the actual summit of Mount Washington (6,288 feet), the Cog Railway will have a daily train dedicated to transporting passengers back and forth from the new station to the summit. If approved, this estimated $14 million dollar project could take up to 7 years to complete.

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Resolution Shelter, Dry River Wilderness

Resolution Shelter was located off of Davis Path in the federally designated Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness in the New Hampshire White Mountains during a snow storm. The Resolution shelter was closed in 2009 because of safety issues, and it was torn down in December of 2011.
(2007) Resolution Shelter – Davis Path, New Hampshire
 

Resolution Shelter, Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness – The Resolution shelter site is located off of the 14-mile long Davis Path in the federally designated Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness in the New Hampshire White Mountains. Designated by the 1975 Eastern Wilderness Act, then expanded in 1984 by the New Hampshire Wilderness Act, this 29,000-acre wilderness area is governed under the National Wilderness Preservation System and the Wilderness Act. Both have strict guidelines when it comes to man-made structures in designated wilderness areas, and permanent improvements are not allowed within these areas.

Completed in 1845 by Nathaniel Davis, son-in-law of Abel and Hannah Crawford, Davis Path was the third and longest bridle path built to the summit of Mount Washington. The path was in use until 1853-1854, and then it was neglected and became unusable. In 1910, the Appalachian Mountain Club’s legendary Trail-builder Warren W. Hart (AMC’s councilor of improvements from 1908-1910), with the help of volunteers, re-opened it as a footpath. Two shelters, Camp Resolution and Camp Isolation, were built along Davis Path in 1912.

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January History, White Mountains

January history, Presidential Range at sunset from Owl's Head (Cherry Mountain) in Carroll, New Hampshire USA during the winter months. The Cohos Trail passes by this view.
Owl's Head (Cherry Mountain) – Carroll, New Hampshire
 

January History, White Mountains – Here in the White Mountains, January is like no other month. The winter season is in full swing, and outdoor enthusiasts are enjoying the snow-covered landscape. Usually, we have had at least one big snowstorm by now, but this year the snow accumulation is on the low side. Hopefully, we get a blizzard sooner than later.

When it comes to White Mountains history, some interesting events happened in January. The town of Lincoln was granted, the United States Geological Survey built a stream gauging station, and a horrific plane crash awoke the quiet town of Woodstock. Continue reading to learn more about these events.

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2021 Year in Review, White Mountains

2021, the Flume Covered Bridge in Franconia Notch, New Hampshire covered in snow on an autumn morning. This picturesque bridge crosses the Pemigewasset River.
Flume Covered Bridge – Flume Gorge, New Hampshire
 

2021 Year in Review, White Mountains – As the year comes to an end, I don't have much to say. And like many of you, I am looking forward to the start of the new year. What a year it has been! This year I am going to keep it short and just make a handful of comments about my favorite images of 2021.

Over the last few years, all we have heard about is how overrun the White Mountains are now. And I agree it is an issue that needs to be addressed. Our trailheads are overflowing into the streets, mountains summits are overcrowded with peakbaggers looking for the perfect selfie, and campgrounds are beyond capacity. But because of the "off the beaten path" locations I have been documenting over the last two years, I have seen almost no one in the White Mountains. Serenity still can be found in the White Mountains.

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December History, White Mountains

December history, Flume Covered Bridge in Franconia Notch State Park in Lincoln, New Hampshire during the night.
Flume Covered Bridge at Night – Lincoln, New Hampshire
 

December History, White Mountains – Here in the White Mountains, December is an exciting month. The ski mountains open for business, hikers are preparing for the official kickoff of the winter hiking season, and snowmobiles are being tuned up. If you enjoy the outdoors, winter is a great time to explore the region.

When it comes to White Mountains history, a handful of events happened in December. J.E. Henry’s mill burns down, a section house was razed, turnpikes were incorporated, and the Underhills became the first people to complete the White Mountain Four 4000 footers during the winter. Included here are a few interesting events.

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