Posts Tagged: white mountains



Identifying Artifacts, White Mountains

An axe head, a protected artifact, near logging Camp 2 of the abandoned Sawyer River Railroad (1877-1928) in Livermore, New Hampshire.
Axe Head – Livermore, New Hampshire
 

Identifying Historical Artifacts, White Mountains – If you are picking up trash in the New Hampshire White Mountains during the 2020 human impact issue, please educate yourself about historical artifacts and the laws that protect them. I now know of two instances where do-gooders picking up trash removed artifacts, thinking they were trash, from the White Mountain National Forest.

Many of the metal objects (horseshoes, metal strapping, railroad spikes, stoves, tins, etc.), glass bottles, trestle remains, and numerous other objects along the White Mountains trail system are protected artifacts. These artifacts should be left where you found them; they help tell the story of the early settlers, farming communities, and logging railroads that once were in the White Mountains. The included photos show some of the various artifacts you could come across while out hiking.

Continue reading right arrow

Ammonoosuc River Waterfalls

Reflection of Mount Washington in Lakes of the Clouds along the Appalachian Trail in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Lakes of the Clouds – Mount Washington, New Hampshire
 

Ammonoosuc River Waterfalls, White Mountains – Beginning at Lakes of the Clouds on Mount Washington in Sargent’s Purchase, this roughly 55 mile long river travels through a number of towns before draining into the Connecticut River at Woodsville in the town of Haverhill. Ammonoosuc is an Abenaki word meaning “fish place” or “small narrowing fishing place". The Abenaki fished and camped along the river.

Protected under the New Hampshire Rivers Management and Protection Program, the Ammonoosuc River is managed in accordance with RSA 483. The portion of the Ammonoosuc River from Lower Falls in Carroll to the Connecticut River in Woodsville was added to the program in 2007. And the portion from Lakes of the Clouds to Lower Falls, known as the Upper Reach watershed, was added to the program in 2009. This work focuses mainly on the Upper Reach section of the river.

Continue reading right arrow

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Utility Poles

Artifact (utility pole) in the area of Camp 17 along the old East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948 in Lincoln, New Hampshire.
East Branch & Lincoln RR – Standing Utility Pole, Camp 17 Area
 

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Utility Poles – Telephone wires were strung from utility poles along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948) to the numerous logging camps. In some areas along the railroad, side mounted wooden telephone peg holder pins nailed directly to trees were used in place of utility poles. Today, these utility poles are considered artifacts of the White Mountains logging era.

While this blog article focuses only on the abandoned East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, other logging railroads in the White Mountains used the same approach described above. And remnants of utility poles can still be found along some of the other railroads. However, as nature slowly reclaims the East Branch & Lincoln territory, standing utility poles are becoming a rarity.

Continue reading right arrow

Sanders Bridge, Randolph Path

Sanders Bridge along the Randolph Path in Low and Burbank's Grant, New Hampshire during the summer months.
Sanders Bridge (2006) – Randolph Path, White Mountains
 

Sanders Bridge, Randolph Path – The Sanders Bridge crosses Cold Brook along the Randolph Path in Low and Burbank's Grant, New Hampshire. It is a memorial to Miriam Sanders, who was treasurer of the Randolph Mountain Club (RMC) for many years. The RMC maintains this rustic looking wooden bridge.

Originally built in 1976, the Sanders Bridge has had repairs over the years. In 2017, when the RMC did repairs to it, students from Burke Mountain Academy transported materials to the bridge site. If you have spent any time on the trail system in the Northern Presidential Range, you are likely aware of the RMC and their dedication to conserving the trails that they maintain.

Continue reading right arrow

Happy Earth Day 2020, New Hampshire

Agassiz Basin, on Mossilauke Brook, in North Woodstock, New Hampshire on a foggy autumn day. Agassiz Basin is named for Swiss naturalist, Louis Agassiz (1807-1873), who visited the region while doing research in the 1800s.
Agassiz Basin – North Woodstock, New Hampshire
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2020 – Happy Earth Day from the New Hampshire White Mountains! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment. This year marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here. In the 21st-century, it is essential that we understand the impact we have on the environment. Education and proper training can help control the problem.

Continue reading right arrow

Trailside History, White Mountains

Trailside history, a lone hiker traveling south along the Appalachian Trail (Franconia Ridge Trail) in the New Hampshire White Mountains during the winter months. Mount Lincoln is in the background.
Franconia Ridge Trail (2008) – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Trailside History, White Mountains – The history of the trail system in the New Hampshire White Mountains is amazing; early 19th-century trail builders are true legends of the White Mountains, and they are forever implanted into the history books. Trails built in the 1800s, such as Crawford Path, Davis Path, and Lowe’s Path, are still in use today. And while the building of hiking trails is a great topic, there are also many interesting features along the trails.

Trailside features such as Cow Cave, Gibbs Brook dam, Walton’s Cascade, and the many abandoned cellar holes along the trail system have some intriguing history attached to them, but they are often unnoticed by today’s hikers. So this blog article focuses on a few trailside features.

Continue reading right arrow

Memorial Bridge, Randolph

Memorial Bridge, which crosses Cold Brook, along the Link Trail in Randolph, New Hampshire. Built in the 1920s this stone bridge is a dedication to all the early pathmakers.
Memorial Bridge, The Link – Randolph, New Hampshire
 

Memorial Bridge, Randolph – Built 1923-1924, Memorial Bridge crosses Cold Brook along “The Link” trail in Randolph, New Hampshire. The bridge was dedicated as a memorial to Randolph's early pathmakers (19th-century trail builders) on August 23, 1924. These early pathmakers are responsible for cutting many of the trails in the Northern Presidential Range.

Louis F. Cutter and Eldredge H. Blood designed and built the bridge. Work began on it in the fall of 1923 and was completed in time for the August 1924 dedication. The span of the bridge is about 26 feet, and it's built of concrete, logs, stone, and supported by a copper-clad log that is said to be over 5 feet in circumference. And the entrances were intentionally kept narrow to prevent horses and cattle from using it.

Continue reading right arrow