Posts Tagged: wilderness act



Definition of Wilderness, White Mountains

Definition of Wilderness, Owls Head from the Franconia Ridge Trail (Appalachian Trail), near Little Haystack Mountain, in the White Mountains of New Hampshire during the last days of summer.
Owls Head – Pemigewasset Wilderness, New Hampshire
 

Definition of Wilderness, White Mountains – I am currently working on a project that has brought me back into the Pemigewasset Wilderness. This wilderness is governed under the National Wilderness Preservation System and the Wilderness Act of 1964. And because it is designated wilderness, it has the highest level of protection for federal lands. The recreational opportunities, historical value, and educational platform the Pemigewasset Wilderness offers will educate outdoor enthusiasts for many years to come. It is important that visitors to the region know that the six designated wilderness areas in the White Mountain National Forest are managed differently than the rest of the National Forest. This is where the Wilderness Act comes into play.

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Pemigewasset Wilderness, Random Thoughts

A hiker takes in the view of the Pemigewasset Wilderness from the summit of Zeacliff during the summer months. This viewpoint offers an excellent view of the wilderness area.
Pemigewasset Wilderness from Zeacliff, New Hampshire
 

The Pemigewasset Wilderness, Random Thoughts – For 2017, I am going to write one blog article a month that is focused on my random thoughts as an environmental photographer living in the New Hampshire White Mountains. I will remain professional when sharing my thoughts but will be a little freer than normal.

Some of you may recognize the above image from Zeacliff Mountain because a similar image is on the cover of the 29th edition of the AMC White Mountain Guide. I look at this image from time to time and think about the solitude I have found in the Pemigewasset Wilderness (45,000 acres) over the years. I also try to imagine how the Pemigewasset Wilderness would look if it was a 45,000-acre condo development.

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Thoreau Falls Trail Bridge, My Viewpoint

Side view of footbridge along the Thoreau Falls Trail, at North Fork Junction, in the Pemigewasset Wilderness of Lincoln, New Hampshire. This bridge is supported by two large white pines and crosses the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River.
Thoreau Falls Trail Bridge (before Irene) – Pemi Wilderness, New Hampshire
 

Thoreau Falls Trail Bridge, My Viewpoint Like many in the New England outdoor community, I have been closely following the Thoreau Falls Trail bridge removal project. I have had interesting conversations as to why the bridge should be replaced, but nothing yet has changed my position, I support removing the bridge from the Pemigewasset Wilderness. I wrote about the issue of this bridge being located in a designated wilderness area back in June, and you can read that blog article here.

It has been brought to my attention that Forest Service is still accepting comments, so I want to pass that along to anyone interested in commenting. Supporters and non-supporters of the bridge removal, if you did not send in comments during the comment period, you still can send them, but do it soon. Today, I am going to share my reasoning as to why I believe the Thoreau Falls Trail bridge should not be replaced. Maybe my comments will influence you to write a letter in support of the bridge removal to Forest Service.

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Thoreau Falls Trail Bridge Removal

Thoreau Falls Trail in Lincoln, New Hampshire.
Thoreau Falls Bridge – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Thoreau Falls Trail, Proposed Bridge Removal – In August of 2011, Tropical Storm Irene caused massive erosion damage to the White Mountains trail system in New Hampshire. Some trails were damaged so badly that they have been permanently closed (Flume Brook Trail in Waterville Valley has been decommissioned). And to this day trail crews are still repairing Irene damaged trails.

Deep in the Pemigewasset Wilderness, at North Fork junction, along the Thoreau Falls Trail, a beloved bridge that crosses the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River was damaged during Tropical Storm Irene. The bridge is now listed to be dismantled on the Forest Services Schedule of Proposed Actions (SOPA). A final decision should haven been made by the end of 2015, but it now appears the decision won’t be made until the summer of 2016 (this is updated information).

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November 2013, Pemi Wilderness Suspension Bridge Update

2009 - Pemigewasset Wilderness -180 foot Suspension bridge, which spans the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River along the Wilderness Trail in Lincoln, New Hampshire USA. This footbridge is located at the Trestle 17 location along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, which was an logging railroad in operation from 1893 - 1948. This bridge was removed in 2009 and no longer exists.

November 2013, Pemi Wilderness Suspension Bridge Removal Update – The remaining debris from the Pemi Wilderness suspension bridge removal project, along the East Branch of the Pemi, in the New Hampshire White Mountains appears to have been removed out of the designated wilderness area. The debris is now outside of the wilderness boundary along the Pemi East Side Trail. However, some debris does remain at the Black Brook bridge site, which was also removed during this project.

Since 2009, when the bridge was removed, I have been making regular trips to the bridge site to document the progress of debris removal. Unforeseen issues turned the debris removal into a 3 + year long project. You can view a slideshow here showing the progression of debris removal over the last 3 years from the bridge site.

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James E. Henry, White Mountains History

Grave site of J.E. Henry (1831 - 1912) at Glenwood Cemetery in Littleton, New Hampshire USA. J.E. Henry was a 19th / 20th century timber baron known for his East Branch & Lincoln Railroad in Lincoln, New Hampshire USA. Historians suggest he was born in 1831 and died on April 19, 1912.
J.E. Henry Burial Site (1831 – 1912) – Glenwood Cemetery, Littleton
 

James E. Henry (1831 – April 19, 1912) – History indicates that James E. Henry died on April 19, 1912. He was a 19th / 20th century timber baron best known for his logging practices and building of the Zealand Valley and East Branch & Lincoln Railroads (1893-1948) in the New Hampshire White Mountains. He forever changed the landscape of the White Mountains with his "cut it all" logging practices. 

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