Posts Tagged: wildwood



Village of Wildwood, New Hampshire

Site of the Wildwood settlement along Route 112 in the town of Easton, New Hampshire. Wildwood was a logging settlement during the 20th century along the Wild Ammonoosuc River. The first Civilian Conservation Corps camp authorized in New Hampshire was also located at Wildwood.
Wildwood – Easton, New Hampshire
 

Village of Wildwood, New Hampshire – When it comes to the abandoned villages in New Hampshire, the logging village of Livermore is often included in the conversation. But the story of the lesser known village of Wildwood is a fascinating piece of White Mountains history. The area known as Wildwood is located along the Wild Ammonoosuc River in the general area of the junction of Route 112 and Tunnel Brook Road in Easton, New Hampshire. Today’s Route 112 travels through Wildwood.

Easton was incorporated into a separate township by an act passed in July 1876. The section of Easton known as Wildwood was once part of Landaff and before that part of Lincoln. And the scenic Wild Ammonoosuc River, known for the early log drives done on it, flows through Easton.

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Scenes of April, New Hampshire

April 2016 - View from the summit of Mount Tecumseh in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire during the month of April. Over the last few years, vandalism (illegal tree cutting) has improved this summit view point.
Mt Tecumseh – Waterville Valley, New Hampshire
 

Scenes of April, New Hampshire – What a month it has been weather wise here in the New Hampshire White Mountains. Ice, snow, rain, and warm weather. You name it, we have had it this month. With April coming to an end, it won’t be long until the grass is green, but the trails are still an icy mess at higher elevations. Crampons have been the chosen foot traction this month.

My monthly blog article showcasing five images from the month only consists of three images this month. April has been an interesting month for me because I had to shut down for most of it to take care of a family matter. This blog article reflects how little shooting I did this month. The last time I had to shut down like this was about thirteen years ago. And I am anxious to get back into the swing of things.

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Scenes of March, New Hampshire

The Pliny Range from Cherry Pond at Pondicherry Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson, New Hampshire during the month of March. The Cohos Trail passes by Cherry Pond.
Cherry Pond – Pondicherry Wildlife Refuge, New Hampshire
 

Scenes of March, New Hampshire – The weather here in the New Hampshire White Mountains during the month of March has been very interesting. The lower elevations have been snow-free for most of the month, and the higher elevations can be best described as an icy mess. And because of the mild winter and warm weather, bears are coming out of their dens early.

Being a native to New Hampshire, who loves the serenity of a snow-covered forest, I have always preferred winters that have large amounts of snow. Well, the 2015-2016 winter season is officially over, and we hardly had any snow here in the White Mountains, but I took advantage of the snow-less winter and scouted out areas I will be shooting in the spring and summer seasons.

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Tributaries of the Wild Ammonoosuc River

 Tributary of the Wild Ammonoosuc River on the side of Mt. Blue in Kinsman Notch of the White Mountains, New Hampshire during the autumn months. This brooks runs on west of Beaver Pond.
Tributary of the Wild Ammonoosuc River – Kinsman Notch, New Hampshire
 

Tributaries of the Wild Ammonoosuc River – This week I started shooting along one of the tributaries of the Wild Ammonoosuc River in Kinsman Notch of New Hampshire. I was able to take advantage of an overcast day to create a handful of pleasing images along an unnamed brook that drains into the Wild Ammonoosuc.

Many of you have listened to me rant and rave about how great the tributaries of Lost River are, well the Wild Ammonoosuc River also has some great tributaries. All of the included cascades are along one brook, and they are possibly the forgotten Blue Ravine Cascades. Though the water level was low on the day I visited, I found them to be very interesting.

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