Posts Tagged: environment



Happy Earth Day 2019, New Hampshire

Happy Earth Day! Cascade on Spur Brook, at Coldspur Ledges, in Randolph, New Hampshire during the summer months. This small cascade is located at the confluence of Cold Brook and Spur Brook.
Coldspur Ledges – Randolph, New Hampshire
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2019 – Happy Earth Day from the New Hampshire White Mountains! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here. In the 21st-century, tourism (biking, hiking, fishing, etc.) has exploded in the White Mountains, and areas are being overused. And because of this, it is essential that we understand the impact we have on the environment. Education and proper training can help control the problem.

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Mount Tecumseh, 4000 Footers Hiking List

The village of Waterville Valley, New Hampshire during the autumn months. Mt Tecumseh is in the background. This mountain is named for the Shawnee chief, Tecumseh  (c.1768–1813).
Mount Tecumseh (2012) – Waterville Valley, New Hampshire
 

Mount Tecumseh, 4000 Footers Hiking List – On the same day that I publicized my Owl’s Head, Conserving Wilderness article, the Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC) posted an article about some of the mountains on the White Mountain 4000 footers hiking list may not be over 4,000 feet. Being over 4,000 feet is one of the criteria for a mountain to be on the list. While our articles focus on different mountains on the hiking list, they both suggest that the time is coming for the AMC 4000 footer club to reevaluate the hiking list.

Lidar, a laser based technology, is currently being used to remap the White Mountains. This technology is very accurate at determining mountain elevations. And it was made public that the Lidar data is indicating that at least one mountain, Mount Tecumseh, is under the 4,000 foot criteria. According to the data Tecumseh is 3,995 feet (see footnote for actual new height), not 4,003 feet. Will the Lidar data reveal that Mount Isolation (4,004 feet) and Mount Waumbek (4,006 feet) are also below the 4,000 foot criteria?

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Abstract Water Scenes, White Mountains

Water abstract of the moon reflecting off the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River along the Kancamagus Scenic Byway (Route 112) in Lincoln, New Hampshire.
Moon Light – East Branch of the Pemigewasset River, New Hampshire
 

Abstract Water Scenes, White Mountains – Most of the easily accessible roadside water scenes in the New Hampshire White Mountains have been photographed from every possible angle. And trying to find a unique perspective can be a tough task for any photographer.

Creating abstract scenes of your favorite brook, river, or waterfall is one way to obtain a unique perspective. Focus on the water bouncing off the rocks, and the lines and curves of the water flowing around the rocks. Each photograph you create will be a little different from the last one.

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Happy Earth Day 2017, New Hampshire

Happy Earth Day! Sunset along the Appalachian Trail (Gulfside Trail) near Mount Clay in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA during the summer months.
Sunset – Gulfside Trail, White Mountains
 

Earth Day, April 22, 2017 – Happy Earth Day from New Hampshire! Earth Day is an annual day founded by US Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970. Many consider Earth Day to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. And the purpose of this day is to celebrate and create awareness for the environment.

Earth Day acts as an educational tool and influences all generations to care about the environment. If you have never heard about this day take some time to read up on the history and importance of Earth Day here.

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Trail Ladders & Stairs, Trail Stewardship

Franconia Notch State Park - Trail ladder along the Hi-Cannon Trail. This trail leads to the summit of Cannon Mountain in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA.
Traditional Ladder – Hi-Cannon Trail, Cannon Mountain
 

Trail Ladders & Stairs, Trail Stewardship – Today’s blog article focuses on a keyword search term. I chose one search term, trail ladder, and searched my image archive to see what imagery I have available that represents this area of trail stewardship. And because staircases and ladders are often considered to be one and the same among some hikers, I have included trail staircases.

Here in the New Hampshire White Mountains, we have some steep trails. And if it wasn’t for trail ladders we would have a heck of a time hiking up and down some trails. Can you imagine ascending or descending the Six Husbands Traill or the Hi-Cannon Trail without ladders? Six Husbands Trail would be interesting.

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Greed and Selfishness, White Mountains

The greed of man. Scenic view of the Presidential Range snow covered from along the Presidential Range Rail Trail at Pondicherry Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson, New Hampshire.
Presidential Range – Pondicherry Wildlife Refuge, New Hampshire
 

Greed and Selfishness, White Mountains – As the new year progresses, I find myself re-evaluating my values as both an environmental photographer and outdoor enthusiast. The sacred places I love and cherish in the New Hampshire White Mountains are all falling victim to the greedy hand of man.

The trail system is being vandalized in different ways, the fragile alpine zone is being trampled, and designated wilderness areas are under constant attack by the new anti-conservationist movement. And with social media being what it is, many want social recognition, so they leave their mark everywhere in the White Mountains.

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Hand of Man in Nature

Hand of man scene. Mount Monroe with Mount Washington in the background from the Appalachian Trail in Sargent's Purchase, New Hampshire.
Mount Monroe – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Hand of Man in Nature – Last week I wrote about how some photographers believe that a true landscape or nature scene is a scene that is absent of all human elements. The scene itself showcases the pure beauty of nature. Well, the opposite of the pure nature scene is the hand of man scene, which includes human elements. Can you see the human element in the above scene?

I prefer to create images that include the hand of man only because they show the interaction we have with the environment. When some people hear the “hand of man” they think of the negative impact that we are doing to the environment. But in photography, the hand of man scene is not always focused on negative impact.

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