Posts Tagged: waterfall



Baston Falls, Woodstock

Eastman Brook in Woodstock, New Hampshire during the autumn months.
Baston’s Mill / Fox’s Mill Site – Eastman Brook, Woodstock
 

Baston Falls, Woodstock – This forgotten waterfall on Baston Brook in Woodstock, New Hampshire is somewhat of a mystery. Using possibly the only historical reference that mentions this waterfall, it is easy to find, but it's not where we think it is. However, based on property maps of Woodstock, it is probably on private property.

In the 21st-century, the consensus is that Baston Falls is on Eastman Brook. Members of the Baston family were living near Eastman Brook in the 1800s. And because Baston’s Mill (the old Fox’s Mill site) was on the brook, the thought is the falls are also on the brook. This mill site, on Eastman Brook at the junction of Route 175 and Thornton Gore Road, dates back to the early 1800s. It changed hands a number of times; Daniel B. Baston (1866-1958), son of Gardner G. Baston* (1816-1895), was one of the owners, and it appears he took control of the mill in 1905. The ownership dates are a little foggy. It was common for the waterfall created from the mill dam to take on the name of the mill, so it should be easy to find Baston Falls right, not so fast.

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Ripley Falls, Crawford Notch

 Ripley Falls on Avalanche Brook in Hart's Location, New Hampshire USA during the spring months. The Arethusa-Ripley Falls Trail travels pass this scenic waterfall.
Ripley Falls – Crawford Notch, New Hampshire
 

Ripley Falls, Crawford Notch – Located on Avalanche Brook in Crawford Notch, New Hampshire, the 100 foot Ripley Falls is one of the more picturesque waterfalls in the White Mountains. The Arethusa-Ripley Falls Trail passes by this waterfall. And while the waterfall is impressive, the history of Ripley Falls and Avalanche Brook is intriguing.

There seems to be some confusion on who first discovered Ripley Falls. Most accounts say Henry W. Ripley and a Mr. Porter first discovered the waterfall in September 1858. But other accounts say a fisherman found the waterfall before Ripley. And another account says Henry W. Ripley was a companion of the legendary Abel Crawford (1766–1851), who discovered the waterfall while out trapping sable.

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Beaver Brook Cascades, Kinsman Notch

Beaver Brook Cascades on Beaver Brook in Kinsman Notch of the New Hampshire White Mountains on a rainy spring day. The Appalachian Tail passes by these cascades.
Beaver Brook Cascades – Kinsman Notch, New Hampshire
 

Beaver Brook Cascades, Kinsman Notch – When it comes to waterfalls in the New Hampshire White Mountains, the waterfalls in Kinsman Notch are often overlooked. I can only guess Kinsman Notch’s reputation of having rough terrain is what keeps most away from exploring this incredible Notch.

Kinsman Notch has a number of named and unnamed waterfalls, and one of the better known ones is Beaver Brook Cascades. These cascades are located on Beaver Brook, and the Appalachian Trail (Beaver Brook Trail) runs on the side of them. The earliest reference I have found to them is from the 1890s.

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Fleming Flume, Elephant Head Brook

Fleming Flume on Elephant Head Brook in Carroll, New Hampshire during the summer months.
Fleming Flume (top section) – Carroll, New Hampshire
 

Fleming Flume, Elephant Head Brook – Over the summer, while doing some research, I came across a water feature in the 1907 Guide to the Paths and Camps in the White Mountains (first edition AMC Guidebook) referred to as Fleming Flume in Carroll, New Hampshire. The write-up also mentions a Fleming Fall. I finally had the chance to visit and photograph this little flume.

I have never heard of Fleming Flume or Fall and have found very limited mention of them in old books. From what I can find, they were only mentioned once in the AMC Guidebook, the 1907 edition. However, the flume does appear to be marked on the Mt Washington map in the 1940 and 1960 AMC Guides but disappears from the maps completely in the 1960s. The marks are hard to see on these maps, but they are there.

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Shell Cascade, Waterville Valley

Shell Cascade in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire during the spring months.This cascade is located on Hardy Brook.
Shell Cascade – Waterville Valley, New Hampshire
 

Shell Cascade, Waterville Valley – Located on Hardy Brook, a tributary of the Mad River, in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire is a small, but unique, cascade known as Shell Cascade. Because of its location, this cascade isn’t visited much. It is not in a remote area by any means, but no official trail leads to it, and during times of high water it can be difficult to reach Hardy Brook. And for these reasons, its considered to be a forgotten waterfall.

Visitors to Waterville Valley and the White Mountains region have been visiting Shell Cascade since the 1800s. Reference to Shell Cascade can be found in the 1892 book “The Waterville Valley: A History, Description, and Guide” By Arthur Lewis Goodrich, and on A.L Goodrich’s 1904 map of Waterville Valley.

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Ellen’s Falls, White Mountains

Ellens Falls are located on Hobbs Brook in Albany, New Hampshire.
Ellen's Falls (top section) – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Ellen's Falls, White Mountains – Ellen's Falls is a picturesque waterfall located on Hobbs Brook, about a mile upstream from its junction with the Kancamagus Highway in Albany, New Hampshire. And though I have read visiting these falls requires bushwhacking up the side of Hobbs Brook from the Kancamagus Highway, there is actually a gated Forest Road that can be used to reach the falls.

Hobbs Brook was probably named for one of Albany’s early settlers, Ruben Derban Hobbs who had a sawmill on the brook. But before Hobbs had his sawmill on the brook a man by the name of Ellen had a sawmill on the brook, and at the time locals referred to the brook as Ellen River. So it seems likely that Ellen’s Falls are named for him. At this point, I have found only one reference to Ellen.

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