Shell Cascade, Waterville Valley

Shell Cascade in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire during the spring months.This cascade is located on Hardy Brook.
Shell Cascade – Waterville Valley, New Hampshire
 

Shell Cascade, Waterville Valley – Located on Hardy Brook, a tributary of the Mad River, in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire is a small, but unique, cascade known as Shell Cascade. Because of its location, this cascade isn’t visited much. It is not in a remote area by any means, but no official trail leads to it, and during times of high water it can be difficult to reach Hardy Brook. And for these reasons, its considered to be a forgotten waterfall.

Visitors to Waterville Valley and the White Mountains region have been visiting Shell Cascade since the 1800s. Reference to Shell Cascade can be found in the 1892 book “The Waterville Valley: A History, Description, and Guide” By Arthur Lewis Goodrich, and on A.L Goodrich’s 1904 map of Waterville Valley.

Shell Cascade in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire during the spring months.This cascade is located on Hardy Brook.
Shell Cascade – Waterville Valley, New Hampshire
 

Like other water features in the White Mountains region, Hardy Brook seems to have gone through a name change. In the early guide books and maps of Waterville Valley, Hardy Brook is spelled "Hardy’s Brook". Today, the apostrophe has been dropped, and this brook is just "Hardy Brook". These name variations may not interest many, but they have peaked my interest.

Shell Cascade in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire during the spring months.This cascade is located on Hardy Brook.
Shell Cascade – Waterville Valley, New Hampshire
 

Just below Shell Cascade, on Hardy Brook, is an abandoned camp, possibly from the logging era. Nature has reclaimed the site to the point where creating an image that showcases the site isn’t possible, but there is still enough evidence to prove a dwelling was there. To date, I have found one reference that mentions a logging camp on Hardy Brook, and I wonder if this is the camp. Can you imagine waking up to this (above) every day?

All of the above images can be licensed for publications by clicking on the image you are interested in. And you can view more images of Shell Cascade here.

Happy image making..


 

To license any of the photos in this blog article for publications, click on the photo.

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Erin Paul is a professional photographer who specializes in environmental conservation and historic preservation photography in the New Hampshire White Mountains. His work is published worldwide, and credits include; Backpacker Magazine, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, the Appalachian Mountain Club, and The Wilderness Society.

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