Old Man of the Valley, Shelburne

Old Man of the Valley in Shelburne, New Hampshire. The state of New Hampshire is part of the New England region, which includes the White Mountain National Forest USA.
Old Man of the Valley – Shelburne, New Hampshire USA
 

Old Man of the Valley – Shelburne, New Hampshire – The Old Man of the Valley rock profile is a neat little tourist attraction that can be found on the side of Route 2 in Shelburne, New Hampshire, near the Maine border. From the roadside parking lot, the rock profile can easily be reached by walking down the trail a few hundred feet. Just look for the large boulder that is resting on another boulder.

Old Man of the Valley in Shelburne, New Hampshire. The scenic state of New Hampshire is part of the New England region.
Old Man of the Valley – Shelburne, New Hampshire USA
 

When you reach the boulders, you will have to position yourself in order to see the actual profile. The above image will help give you an idea of where to stand to view the profile. From the right viewpoint, it does look like that of an old man.

The Old Man of the Valley profile does not take the place of the Old Man of the Mountain profile in Franconia Notch State Park, but it is worth checking out if you are traveling Route 2 in Shelburne, New Hampshire.

If you are visiting the Old Man of the Valley with the intent to photograph him, I recommend going on an overcast day. On a cloudy day, the clouds act as a natural diffuser and produce even light across the forest and rock profile. Meaning there will be no hot spots (areas of distracting burnt out highlights) in your image.

Happy image making..


 

To license any of the above images for usage in publications, click on the image.

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Erin Paul is a professional photographer who specializes in environmental conservation and historic preservation photography in the New Hampshire White Mountains. His work is published worldwide, and credits include; Backpacker Magazine, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, the Appalachian Mountain Club, and The Wilderness Society.

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