Human Element, Landscape Photography

Human Element - A winter hiker ascends the Airline Trail during the winter months in extreme weather conditions in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.
King Ravine – White Mountains of New Hampshire
 

Human Element, Landscape Photography – Even though I prefer a landscape free of human clutter, including a human element in the scene allows us to connect emotionally with the scene. And if done correctly, scenes that include a human element will pull the viewer into the landscape.

The above image from the alpine zone, along the Airline Trail, in the White Mountains of New Hampshire would have little impact and viewing interest without the hiker and snowshoe tracks. It is easy to understand why mountaineers from all over the world flock to the White Mountains every winter. The landscape is beautiful!

Appalachian Trail- Galehead Hut from the Frost Trail during the winter months in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Galehead Hut – White Mountains of New Hampshire
 

Human presence, good or bad, in a scene also helps create awareness for conservation and environmental issues surrounding the New England landscape. The human element allows us to see first-hand the positive and negative impacts we have on the natural environment. As environmental photographer and advocate for sustainable land stewardship in the White Mountains, I prefer to create imagery that shows the impact we are doing to the White Mountains. This type of imagery leaves a last impression on outdoor enthusiasts.

Human Element - Group of hikers on a warm summer day along the Tuckerman Crossover Trail in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Mount Monroe is in the background and clouds fill the sky.
Tuckerman Crossover Trail – Mount Washington, New Hampshire
 

Including a human element in a scene adds market value, meaning there is greater potential for these images to be licensed for publications than similar images that are free of human clutter. And including a human element will add a little more interest to your everyday landscape scenes. Give it a try on your next photo expedition.

To license any of the above images for usage in publications, click on the image. And you can view more images that include the human presence here.

Happy image making…


 

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Erin Paul is a professional photographer who specializes in environmental conservation and historic preservation photography in the New Hampshire White Mountains. His work is published worldwide, and credits include; Backpacker Magazine, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, the Appalachian Mountain Club, and The Wilderness Society.

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