New Hampshire 52 With A View

Mount Chocorua from Middle Sister Mountain in Albany, New Hampshire USA during the summer months.
Mount Chocorua From Middle Sister Mountain – Albany, New Hampshire
 

New Hampshire 52 With A View – Created by the Over the Hill Hikers (OTHH) of Sandwich, NH, the New Hampshire 52 with a view is a hiking list consisting of fifty-two mountains under 4,000 feet that have awesome views; until the most recent revision of the list in spring 2020, a mountain also had to be over 2,500 feet, but this requirement seems to have been relaxed. Hikers can apply for a patch through the Over the Hill Hikers after completing the list.

Over the Hill Hikers came to be in 1979; it started off as just a group of friends hiking together. Then, a few years later, Elizabeth "Lib" Bates and her husband Charles Crooker organized the group. And the popularity of the group continued to grow throughout the years. In the early 1990s (1991), members of the hiking group got tired of hiking the 4,000 footer hiking list, which consists of 48 mountains, so they created the 52 with a view list. The group believed that the combination of the two hiking lists offered the best 100 hikes. Today, this group hikes on a regular schedule and is more popular than ever.

For 16 years, "Lib" Bates was the Den Mother of the Over the Hill Hikers. She passed away on October 11, 2011, at the age of 92. Her father was Milton “Red Mac” MacGregor (1884-1976), the first caretaker of Carter Notch Hut. He was also the first manager of the Appalachian Mountain Club's hut system, overseeing Carter, Lakes of the Clouds, and Madison Spring huts from 1921 to 1927. Some believe that his ghost visits Carter Notch Hut from time to time.

One of the requirements for a mountain to be on the list is that it must have a view. Because views change for various reasons, such as tree growth, the list has been revised a few times over the years. And it may need to be revised again in the future.

Revisions:

  • Carr Mountain was removed in 2001 and replaced with Black Mountain (Jackson).
  • Mount Wolf was removed in 2010 and replaced with Mount Roberts.
  • In May 2020, five mountains: Black Mountain in Jackson, Iron Mountain, Square Ledge, Hibbard Mountain, and West Royce Mountain were removed from the hiking list, and five mountains: Morgan, Percival, Pine Mountain, Roger's Ledge, and Table Mountain were added to this hiking list.

If hiking for the patch, hikers can hike any combination of the current peaks and delisted peaks, it just needs to total 52. Many hikers hike them all.

When it comes to researching these hikes, New Hampshire maps are the best resource. And in the 21st-century, internet-savvy hikers will find an abundance of information about these hikes online. However, maps are always the best option.

Keeping track of these hikes can be done with the New Hampshire 52 With a View Passport. A book was also published in 2011 about this group: Over the Hill Hikers: And How They Grew…and Grew…and Grew by Shirley Elder Lyons.

The mountains on this list are rich with history. Below are the 52 current mountains (as of September 2022), and the 7 delisted ones, on the New Hampshire 52 with a View list. Included are random tidbits of history about each mountain.

New Hampshire 52 With A View
(Current List, September 2022) 

MountainElevation (feet)StatusHistory Note
Sandwich Dome3,992On ListThe original name of Sandwich Dome was Black Mountain. Geographer Arnold Guyot is responsible for the name being changed to Sandwich Dome.

This mountain is also known as Sandwich Mountain.
Mount Starr King3,915On ListNamed for Reverend Thomas Starr King (1824–1864). King was an Unitarian minister best known for his book published in 1859 - The White hills: their legends, landscape, and poetry.
Mount Webster3,910On ListNamed for Daniel Webster (1782–1852), a New Hampshire lawyer, statesman and orator.
The Horn3,900On ListLocated in the Pilot Range, the Horn is suppose to look like an animal’s horn.

Great view of The Horn from Unknown Pond.
Shelburne Moriah Mountain3,743On ListThe northernmost peak in the Carter-Moriah Range. Great views.

The name comes from the mountains proximity to the town of Shelburne. The origin of “Moriah” is not straight forward, but the legend has become the accepted belief. Legend has it that an early setter in the area familiar with the bible gave this name to Mount Moriah. Mount Moriah is a mountain in Jerusalem where Solomon built the temple.
Sugarloaf (Stratford)3,703On ListSugarloaf is a common name used for mountains dating backing many years. The term sugarloaf comes from the early sugar making industry. Mountains given this name are said to have a shape similar to the cone-shaped “loaves” (sugarloaves) in which sugar was sold during the early years.
North Baldface Mountain3,597On ListBoth North and South Baldface Mountain were likely named for their treeless summits; likely the result of fires in the 1800s.

On August 2, 1982, a single- engine Piper Cherokee (N5566F) encountered bad weather and crashed just below the summit of North Badlface Mountain. The pilot was killed on impact, but the one female passenger survived.

Many hike South and North Baldface in one hike.
Mount Success3,592On ListLocated in the Mahoosuc Range, this mountain is named for the town it is in, Success, New Hampshire.

On November 30, 1954, Northeast Airlines, Flight 792 (N17891) crashed into the southern slope of Mount Success. All seven people onboard survived the initial crash, but while waiting to be rescued, two crew members died from injuries that they sustained in the crash. Poor weather conditions made search and rescue efforts difficult, and the remaining five survivors were not rescued until the plane wreckage was located on December 2, 1954.
South Baldface Mountain3,576On ListBoth North and South Baldface Mountain were likely named for their treeless summits; likely the result of fires in the 1800s.

On August 2, 1982, a single- engine Piper Cherokee (N5566F) encountered bad weather and crashed just below the summit of North Badlface Mountain. The pilot was killed on impact, but the one female passenger survived.

Many hike South and North Baldface in one hike.
Mount Martha - Cherry Mountain3,557On ListCherry Mountain is a mountain ridge in Carroll; it was once referred to as Pondicherry Mountain. Mount Martha and Owl’s Head are two peaks on Cherry Mountain; the highest peak on the ridge is Mount Martha.

The famous Cherry Mountain Slide happened on July 10, 1885. The slide began on Owl’s Head and slid down into the valley; Oscar’s Stanley’s farmstead was destroyed by the avalanche of debris. One of his hired workers, Donald Walker, was fatally injured in the slide. Though commonly called the Cherry Mountain Slide, its also known as the Stanley Slide.

A fire tower (1939-1968) was on Mount Martha.

On November 22, 1948, a plane crashed into the side of Cherry Mountain. The pilot and two passengers were killed.
Jennings Peak3,493On ListNamed for “Captivity” Jennings - “Captivity” Jennings’ mother, Hannah (Dickinson) Gillett Jennings, along with others, were kidnapped by Indians in September 1677 and taken to Canada. “Captivity” Jennings was born on March 14, 1678, while Hannah was in captivity. Hannah, her new baby, and others would be rescued, and once a ransom was paid, she and the others returned home around June 1678. Her husband, Stephen Jennings was one of the rescuers.

On March 19, 1966 a Cessna plane crashed into the side of Jennings Peak; the pilot was killed. The wreckage was not found until 6 weeks later.

Mount Chocorua
3,490On ListMountain is named for Chocorua, a 1700s Sokosis chief.

The legend of Chocorua varies, but the one repeated most often is that he befriended a settler named Cornelius Campbell in the early 1700s. And while under the care of the Campbells, Chocorua’s son accidentally drank poison and died. Chocorua swore revenge on the family. And when Cornelius’ wife and children were found dead, Campbell chased Chocorua up the mountain (Mount Chocorua). Realizing he was going to be killed, Chocorua climbed a boulder and jumped off the mountain. Before jumping to his death, he put a curse on the white man.

A fire in the 1800s burned the summit bare.

The Jim Liberty Cabin on Mount Chocorua occupies the site of the Chocorua Peak House. David Knowles and Newell Forrest acquired the Peak House site in 1892 from Jim (Dutch) Liberty. They replaced the original Peak House that Jim Liberty built with a three-story Peak House. It opened to the public in 1892. And even though the Peak House was anchored to the rock with steel cables and chains, it was blown off the mountain during a windstorm in September 1915. It wasn’t rebuilt.
Stairs Mountain3,469On ListLocated along Davis Path, this mountain consists of two ledges that look like giant steps.

Completed in 1845 by Nathaniel Davis, son-in-law of Abel and Hannah Crawford, Davis Path was the third and longest bridle path built to the summit of Mount Washington. The path was in use until about 1853-1854, and then it was neglected and became unusable. In 1910, the Appalachian Mountain Club’s legendary Trail-builder Warren W. Hart (AMC’s councilor of improvements from 1908-1910), with the help of volunteers, re-opened it as a footpath. Today, the path is just over 14 miles long with most of it being within the Presidential Range – Dry River Wilderness.
Mount Avalon3,461On ListMount Avalon was named by Moses F. Sweetser, a 19th-century guidebook and travel writer. He thought this mountain resembled hills in Avalon in Newfoundland, Canada.

Spur of Mount Field. Limited views.
Mount Resolution3,426On ListIt took Nathaniel Davis two tries to complete the third and longest bridle path (Davis Path) built to the summit of Mount Washington. Mount Resolution is where he started the second time.

Completed in 1845 by Nathaniel Davis, son-in-law of Abel and Hannah Crawford, Davis Path was the third and longest bridle path built to the summit of Mount Washington. The path was in use until about 1853-1854, and then it was neglected and became unusable. In 1910, the Appalachian Mountain Club’s legendary Trail-builder Warren W. Hart (AMC’s councilor of improvements from 1908-1910), with the help of volunteers, re-opened it as a footpath. Today, the path is just over 14 miles long with most of it being within the Presidential Range – Dry River Wilderness.
Percy Peaks - North Peak3,415On ListWhen Stark was granted in 1774 it was originally named Percy, after Hugh Percy, 1st Duke of Northumberland. But in 1832 the town was renamed Stark for General John Stark (Bunker Hill and Battle of Bennington). Percy Peaks retained the name of the original town name.
Magalloway Mountain3,385On ListLocated in Pittsburg, the name “Magalloway” is from the Native American language, but the meaning is not exactly clear. The Native American meaning could be “the shoveler”; when looking for food in the snow, caribou use their hoofs to shovel snow to one side. The meaning could also be ”dwelling place of moose”. Interestingly, most descriptions of the Magalloway River say its name is from the Native American language meaning “large tail”. Same word, different meanings.

Since 1910, a fire tower has been on this mountain. The tower has been replaced a few times. Great views from observation tower.
Mount Tremont3,384On ListThe word “Tremont” is of French origin meaning “three mountains”; there are three peaks associated with Mount Tremont. This is the assumed origin of the name.

Fire burned the summit / ridge of this mountain, likely in the 1800s.

Great view of Sawyer Pond and surrounding area.
Middle Sister Mountain

3,340On ListGroundhouse (fire tower) on Middle Sister Mountain that operated from 1927-1948.
Kearsarge North3,269On ListSince at least the 1700s, this mountain has been known by two names: Mount Kearsarge and Mount Pequawket. The spelling of both names vary on old maps and in literature. And to add more confusion, New Hampshire has two mountains called Kearsarge; this one, in Carroll County, and the other in Merrimack County.

In 1915, the United States Board on Geographic Names officially declared that the mountain in Merrimack County was Mount Kearsarge, and the mountain in Carroll County (this one) would be called Mount Pequawket. But people continued to call it Kearsarge, so in 1957 (wasn’t published until 1959) it was approved to change the name to “Kearsarge North”. “North” was added to help distinguish it from the Mount Kearsarge in Merrimack County.

A hotel was built on the summit in the 1800s; it was blown down in the late 1800s.

A fire tower is still on the summit.
Smarts Mountain3,238On ListLikely named for an early settler of the area. Smarts Mountain was also known as Maskoma Mountain.

On September 20, 1971, a twin engine Piper Apache crashed into the side of Smart’s Mountain. Of the three on board, two survived and one died.

On December 24, 1996, a Learjet (N388LS) crashed near this mountain. The wreckage wasn’t found until November 1999; this is the longest missing aircraft search in the state's history. Both pilots were killed.
North Moat Mountain3,203On ListThe name dates to the 1700s. And its believed the name has to do with the beaver ponds (called moats) that form around beaver lodges when beavers build dams along brooks, rivers, etc.

Moat Mountains burned in 1854.

During the early years, misspelled as “Mote”.
Mount Monadnock3,170On ListEarliest recorded ascent was by Captain Samuel Willard in 1725.

The bare summit is the result of early fires.
Imp Face3,165On ListSuppose to resemble a distorted human profile that is best seen from Dolly Copp Campground.
Mount Cardigan3,149On ListLocated in the towns of Orange and Alexandria, fire burned over the summit in 1855 and it is the reason why the summit is bald.

Name origin is likely from the original name of Orange, New Hampshire. This town was granted in 1769 to Isaac Fellows and others, under the name “Cardigan”. In 1790, the town was incorporated as Orange.

A fire tower on the summit was put into operation in 1924 and it is still in use today.
Mount Crawford3,128On ListNamed for Abel Crawford and his son Ethan Allen, early settlers of the area. The Crawford Family is forever part of White Mountains history. Some of the family’s accomplishments include the building of the famous Crawford Path and the Notch House.

Crawford Path is the oldest continuously-used mountain trail in America. And for a period of time, it was used as a horse trail to Mount Washington. This eight and half mile historic path came to be in 1819 when Abel Crawford and his son, Ethan Allen, began building a trail to the summit of Mount Pierce, formerly Mount Clinton.

In 1828, Ethan Allen Crawford and his father Abel Crawford built the Notch House at the Gate of the Notch. Ethan’s brother Thomas J. Crawford was the proprietor.
Mount Paugus3,100On ListNamed by Lucy Larcom, this mountain is named for Paugus, a 1700s Pequawket Chief who was killed at the Battle of Lovewell’s Pond (Maine) in May 1725. Captain John Lovewell, who the Pequawket tribe was fighting, was also killed. The Pequawket tribe lived along the Saco River in today’s Conway, New Hampshire and Fryeburg, Maine.

Mount Paugus has been known by a number of names: Berry Mountain, Deer Mountain, Middle Mountain, Hunchback Mountain, Frog Mountain, Bald Mountain, Moose Mountain, and Ragged Mountain, and Old Shag.
North Doublehead / South Doublehead3,051 / 2,939On ListCalled Doublehead because the mountain has two summits.
Eagle Crag (Evans Notch)3,020On ListA common name given to cliffs, ledges, mountains, etc. Great views.
Mount Parker3,013On ListMount Parker may have been named for a family that lived in the area during the 1800s.
Mount Shaw2,990On ListLocated within the Castle in the Clouds Conservation Area, Mount Shaw was named for Benjamin Franklin Shaw in 1882. Originally named “Black Snout” the town voted in 1882 to change the name to Mount Shaw.

Born in Monmouth, Maine (November 22, 1832 - December 11, 1890), Benjamin Franklin Shaw invented the seamless stocking, and the Shaw Stocking loom (Shaw Knitting Machine). He also developed the Ossipee Mountain Park in the 1880s, and built Weelahka Hall.

Mount Shaw is the highest mountain in the Ossipee Range.
Rogers Ledge2,965On ListRoger’s Ledge is named in honor of Major Robert Rogers (November 7, 1731 - May 18, 1795). Rogers was the leader of Rogers’ Rangers during the French and Indian War (1754 – 1763); they fought for the British Army.

In May 2020, five mountains: Black Mountain in Jackson, Iron Mountain, Square Ledge, Hibbard, and West Royce were removed from this hiking list, and five mountains: Morgan, Percival, Pine Mountain, Roger's Ledge, and Table Mountain were added to this hiking list. This is one of the mountains added to the list in 2020.
Eastman Mountain2,938On ListNamed for an early family (the Eastman Family) in the area.
Mount Kearsarge2,935On ListLocated in Merrimack County in the towns of Wilmot and Warner, the bare summit of this mountain is the result of a 1796 fire.

Two state parks are located on this mountain: Winslow State Park and Rollins State Park. Winslow State Park is named for a 19th-century hotel, the Winslow House; the Winslow House was named for Admiral John Winslow, commander of the USS Kearsarge during the Ciivil War. The hotel was abandoned and eventually burned down; only a cellar hole remains. Rollins State Park is named for Frank W. Rollins (February 24, 1860 – October 27, 1915), who served as governor of New Hampshire from 1899 to 1901


This mountain is often confused with Kearsarge (North) Mountain in Carroll County.
Mount Cube - South Peak2,916On ListOriginally named Mount Cuba, Mount Cube is the corruption of this name. The name Cuba comes from a hunting dog that was killed while fighting a bear near the summit (Sweetser, 1876).

From a geology point of view, Mount Cube is well preserved. The summit / ledges of Mount Cube consist of quartzite (white) of the Clough formation; this formation is very hard rock.

The scenic Appalachian Trail travels over this mountain.
Stinson Mountain2,890On ListStinson Mountain is named for David Stinson of Londonderry. In April 1752, he was part of a hunting party that was attacked by Indians in the area of Stinson Lake. David Stinson was killed, and John Stark was captured and taken to Canada.

This mountain had a fire tower on it. A steel tower was built in 1927 (replaced a wooden one built earlier), and it was in service until the 1960s. It was dismantled in 1985.
Mount Willard2,850On ListNamed for Joseph Willard, a hiking companion of Thomas J. Crawford (Notch House). Originally this mountain was named Mount Tom for Thomas J. Crawford, but the name was changed to Mount Willard.
Black Mountain (Benton)2,829On ListBlack Mountain is a common name used for mountains that are dark in appearance.

From 1911 - 1978, there was a fire tower on this mountain.
South Moat Mountain2,772On ListThe name dates to the 1700s. And its believed the name has to do with the beaver ponds (called moats) that form around beaver lodges when beavers build dams along brooks, rivers, etc.

Moat Mountains burned in 1854.

During the early years, misspelled as “Mote”.
Potash Mountain2,691On ListThe name “Potash” comes from this mountain’s resemblance to an inverted potash kettle (Beals, 1916). Early settlers used kettles when making potash; potash comes from wood ashes.
Table Mountain2,669On ListTable Mountain is a common name for mountains that have a near flat top.

In May 2020, five mountains: Black Mountain in Jackson, Iron Mountain, Square Ledge, Hibbard, and West Royce were removed from this hiking list, and five mountains: Morgan, Percival, Pine Mountain, Roger's Ledge, and Table Mountain were added to this hiking list. This is one of the mountains added to the list in 2020.
Blueberry Mountain (Benton)2,663On ListThis is Blueberry Mountain in Benton. Blueberry is another common name for mountains. And it usually relates to blueberries on the mountain.
Mount Israel2,636On ListMount Israel is named for Israel Gilman, who settled in the area in 1768.

From 1912 - 1926 there was a fire tower (Mount Israel Tower) on the summit.
Welch Mountain / Dickey Mountain2,598 and 2,722On List“Welch” and “Dickey” may have been named for early settlers of the area, but the origin of these names is not fully known.

Great hike for small mountains.
Mount Roberts2,584On ListLocated in the Ossipee Range, Mount Roberts is named for the Isaac Roberts family, early (1800s) settlers of the area.
Mount Hayes2,573On ListNamed for Margaret Hayes. She ran the White Mountain Station House in Gorham during the 1800s.

The Mascot Mine was on Mount Hayes; this mining operation mined Silver-bearing Galena in the late 1800s. Financially, the operation was not successful, and the mining operation was short-lived.
Mount Pemigewasset2,552On ListKnown for the Indian head profile, a natural rock profile best seen from the road.

The name origin varies; some believe the name comes from the Pemigewasset River; an Abenaki word meaning “swift current” or “where the entering current is” or “rapids”. The word meaning also varies. Others believe it was named for “Chief Pemigewasset”; legend has it that he used this mountain as a look out for enemies.
Hedgehog Mountain2,543On ListName has a connection to the animal - hedgehog (Beals, 1916). The hedgehog profile can only be seen from certain areas in the Albany Intervale.
Middle Sugarloaf Mountain2,538On ListSugarloaf is a common name used for mountains dating backing many years. The term sugarloaf comes from the early sugar making industry. Mountains given this name are said to have a shape similar to the cone-shaped “loaves” (sugarloaves) in which sugar was sold during the early years.
Pine Mountain2,404On ListPine Mountain was once heavily wooded, but forest fires destroyed most of the trees and soil, leaving much of the mountain bare.

There was also a fire tower on the mountain from 1910-1967.

In May 2020, five mountains: Black Mountain in Jackson, Iron Mountain, Square Ledge, Hibbard, and West Royce were removed from this hiking list, and five mountains: Morgan, Percival, Pine Mountain, Roger's Ledge, and Table Mountain were added to this hiking list. This is one of the mountains added to the list in 2020.
Mount Morgan2,213On ListLocated in the Squam Range, Morgan is likely named for an early settler of the area.

Mount Morgan and Mount Percival can be done in a loop hike. This is a very popular hike.

In May 2020, five mountains: Black Mountain in Jackson, Iron Mountain, Square Ledge, Hibbard, and West Royce were removed from this hiking list, and five mountains: Morgan, Percival, Pine Mountain, Roger's Ledge, and Table Mountain were added to this hiking list. This is one of the mountains added to the list in 2020.
Mount Percival2,200On ListLocated in the Squam Range, Percival is likely named for an early settler of the area.

Mount Morgan and Mount Percival can be done in a loop hike. This is a very popular hike.

In May 2020, five mountains: Black Mountain in Jackson, Iron Mountain, Square Ledge, Hibbard, and West Royce were removed from this hiking list, and five mountains: Morgan, Percival, Pine Mountain, Roger's Ledge, and Table Mountain were added to this hiking list. This is one of the mountains added to the list in 2020.
Mount Wolf3,478DelistedMount Wolf was removed from the list in 2010 and replaced with Mount Roberts.
Carr Mountain3,454DelistedCarr's summit was the site of a fire tower. It was in operation from 1939-1948.

Carr Mountain was removed from the list in 2001 and replaced with Black Mountain (Jackson).
West Royce Mountain3,204DelistedThe Royce Mountains were named for Captain Vera Royce, a soldier in the French and Indian War (1754-1763).

This mountain was removed from the hiking list in 2020.
Hibbard Mountain2,944DelistedLocated north of Mount Wonalancet, this mountain is named for Ellery Albee Hibbard (July 31, 1826 – July 24, 1903), a Judge from Laconia.

This mountain was removed from the hiking list in 2020.
Black Mountain (Jackson)2,756DelistedBlack Mountain is a common name used for mountains that are dark in appearance.

This mountain was removed from the hiking list in 2020.
Iron Mountain2,723DelistedIron mining took place on this mountain during the 1800s, and it closed in the 1870s. This mining operation mined iron ore; old mine shafts remain on the side of the mountain.

Even though this mountain was removed from the list, it has great views from the south cliffs.

This mountain was removed from the hiking list in 2020.
Square Ledge2,620DelistedPeregrine falcons nest here.

This mountain was removed from the hiking list in 2020.

The landscape of New Hampshire is breathtaking, and incredible places can be found in every corner of New Hampshire; this hiking list is a great way to explore some of the state.

The information included here was first published in another area of this website in 2014. And the above list, up to date as of September 2022, shows the current mountains on the 52 With A View hiking list.

 

Happy image making..


 

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References:
Appalachian Mountain Club. Appalachia Vol. I, June 1876: The Journal of the The Appalachian Mountain Club. Boston, MA: Houghton Osgood and Company, 1876.

Baird, Iris, Kelley, Jack. New Hampshire Fire Towers. [online] Firelookout.org. Available at: http://www.firelookout.org/lookouts/nh/nh.htm. n.d.

Beals, Charles Edward, Jr. Passaconaway in the White Mountains. Boston, MA: The Gorham Press, 1916.

Department of the Interior. United States Board of Geographic Names: Decisions on names in the Untied States Alaska and Hawaii. Washington D.C.: Department of the Interior, 1957.

Gannett, Henry. The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States, Second Edition. Washington, D.C: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1905.

Goodale, Christine L. “Fire in the White Mountains: A Historical Perspective.” Appalachia, December 2003, pp. 60-75.

Hadley, Jarvis B., Chapman, Carleton A. The Geology of Mt. Cube and Mascoma Quadrangles New Hampshire. Concord, NH: State Planning and Development Commission, 1939.

Legacy.com. “Elizabeth Bates Obituary (2011) – Sandwich, NH – the Citizen.” Legacy.com, 28 Oct. 2011, https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/citizen/obituary.aspx?n=elizabeth-bates-lib&pid=154287642 .

Lyons, Shirley Elder. Over the Hill Hikers: And How They Grew and Grew and Grew. Portsmouth, NH: Peter E. Randall Publisher, 2011.

Merrill, Georgia Drew. History of Carroll County, New Hampshire. Boston, MA: W.A. Fergusson and Company, 1889.

Mudge, John T. B. The White Mountains: Names, Places & Legends. Etna, NH: Durand Press, 1992.

Sweetser, Moses Foster. The White Mountains: A Handbook for Travellers. Boston, MA: James R. Osgood and Company, 1876.

Sweetser, Moses Foster. The White Mountains: A Handbook for Travellers, Eleventh Edition. Boston, MA: James R. Osgood and Company, 1891.

The Town Register: Ashland, Plymouth, Sandwich, Campton, Holderness, Center Harbor, Moultonboro. Augusta, ME: The Mitchell-Cony Co., Inc., 1908.

Waterman, Laura, Waterman, Guy. Forest and Crag: A History of Hiking, Trail Blazing, and Adventure in the Northeast Mountains, Thirtieth Anniversary Edition. Albany, NY: Excelsior Editions, 2019.

Workers of the Federal Writers' Project. American Guide Series, New Hampshire: A Guide To The Granite State. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1938.

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Erin Paul is a professional photographer, writer, and author who specializes in environmental conservation and historic preservation photography in the New Hampshire White Mountains. His work is published worldwide, and credits include; Backpacker Magazine, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, the Appalachian Mountain Club, and The Wilderness Society.

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