Boise Rock, Franconia Notch

Cannon Cliff on the side of Cannon Mountain in Franconia Notch State Park in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA during the summer months.
Cannon Cliff – Cannon Mountain, New Hampshire
 

Boise Rock, Franconia Notch – Along the northbound lane of the Franconia Notch Parkway, just south of Profile Lake, in New Hampshire's Franconia Notch, is the Boise Rock scenic pull-off; there is an impressive view of Cannon Cliff (above) from this pull-off. Cannon Cliff is the site of the now gone Old Man of the Mountain rock profile, and it is known worldwide for rock climbing.

The main attraction at this scenic pull-off is an interesting glacier erratic known as Boise (spelled Boyce in early publications) Rock. This large boulder has been a tourist attraction since the early 1800s.

Boise Rock in Franconia Notch State Park in the New Hampshire White Mountains during the spring months. Folklore is that Thomas Boise spent the night under the overhang of this boulder during a blizzard in the 1800s.
Boise Rock – Franconia Notch, New Hampshire
 

While traveling through Franconia Notch in the 1800s, shortly after the Notch Road opened in 1805, a blizzard overtook local teamster Thomas Boise (also spelled Boyce). The weather was so severe that he was forced to spend the night under this large rock overhang. In order to survive through the night, he took drastic measures. He killed and then skinned his horse and wrapped the horse's hide around him to stay warm. The next day, rescuers were sent out to search for him, and they found him under the overhang still alive. They had to cut the frozen horse hide off of him.

Boise Rock in Franconia Notch State Park in the New Hampshire White Mountains during the spring months. Folklore is that Thomas Boise spent the night under the overhang of this boulder during a blizzard in the 1800s.
Boise Rock – Franconia Notch, New Hampshire
 

While not as impressive as the Flume Gorge or the Basin, Boise Rock is an interesting piece of Franconia Notch history. The photo above shows the backside of the boulder.

Old kettle in Franconia Notch State Park, New Hampshire. This kettle collects the water from the spring; it was likely produced by Franconia Iron Works (1800s) in Franconia. The Flume House, which was located in the southern section of Franconia Notch may have owned this kettle. The Flume House was an 1800s hotel that burned down on June 27, 1918.
Old Kettle – Franconia Notch, New Hampshire
 

Another interesting feature at the Boise Rock pull-off is a spring. The old kettle that collects the water from the spring was likely produced by Franconia Iron Works (operated in the 1800s) in Franconia. The Flume House, an 1800s hotel located at the southern end of Franconia Notch that burned down on June 27, 1918, may have owned the kettle.

Happy image making..


 

© Erin Paul Donovan. All rights reserved | Historic Information Disclaimer | Franconia Notch Prints
 

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Erin Paul is a professional photographer, writer, and author who specializes in environmental conservation and historic preservation photography in the New Hampshire White Mountains. His work is published worldwide, and credits include; Backpacker Magazine, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, the Appalachian Mountain Club, and The Wilderness Society.

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