Posts Tagged: nathaniel davis



Resolution Shelter, Dry River Wilderness

Resolution Shelter was located off of Davis Path in the federally designated Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness in the New Hampshire White Mountains during a snow storm. The Resolution shelter was closed in 2009 because of safety issues, and it was torn down in December of 2011.
(2007) Resolution Shelter – Davis Path, New Hampshire
 

Resolution Shelter, Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness – The Resolution shelter site is located off of the 14-mile long Davis Path in the federally designated Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness in the New Hampshire White Mountains. Designated by the 1975 Eastern Wilderness Act, then expanded in 1984 by the New Hampshire Wilderness Act, this 29,000-acre wilderness area is governed under the National Wilderness Preservation System and the Wilderness Act. Both have strict guidelines when it comes to man-made structures in designated wilderness areas, and permanent improvements are not allowed within these areas.

Completed in 1845 by Nathaniel Davis, son-in-law of Abel and Hannah Crawford, Davis Path was the third and longest bridle path built to the summit of Mount Washington. The path was in use until 1853-1854, and then it was neglected and became unusable. In 1910, the Appalachian Mountain Club’s legendary Trail-builder Warren W. Hart (AMC’s councilor of improvements from 1908-1910), with the help of volunteers, re-opened it as a footpath. Two shelters, Camp Resolution and Camp Isolation, were built along Davis Path in 1912.

Continue reading right arrow

Davis Path, White Mountains

Crawford Notch State Park - Bemis Bridge, which crosses the Saco River along Davis Path in the White Mountain National Forest of New Hampshire.
Bemis Bridge – Crawford Notch, New Hampshire
 

Davis Path, White Mountains – Davis Path, completed in 1845 by Nathaniel Davis, son-in-law of Abel and Hannah Crawford, was the third and longest bridle path built to the summit of Mount Washington. The path was in use until about 1853-1854, and then it was neglected and became unusable. In 1910, the Appalachian Mountain Club’s legendary Trail-builder Warren W. Hart (AMC’s councilor of improvements from 1908-1910), with the help of volunteers, re-opened it as a footpath. Today, the path is just over 14 miles long with most of it being within the Presidential Range – Dry River Wilderness.

The Davis Path begins in Crawford Notch, near the Notchland Inn, and crosses the Saco River by use of the 168 foot long Bemis Bridge (above). The Bemis Bridge, named after Samuel A. Bemis, is considered to be an asymmetrical cable stay bridge, and is also the start of the 165 mile long Cohos Trail.

Continue reading right arrow