Resolution Shelter, Dry River Wilderness

Resolution Shelter was located off of Davis Path in the federally designated Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness in the New Hampshire White Mountains during a snow storm. The Resolution shelter was closed in 2009 because of safety issues, and it was torn down in December of 2011.
(2007) Resolution Shelter – Davis Path, New Hampshire
 

Resolution Shelter, Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness – The Resolution shelter site is located off of the 14-mile long Davis Path in the federally designated Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness in the New Hampshire White Mountains. Designated by the 1975 Eastern Wilderness Act, then expanded in 1984 by the New Hampshire Wilderness Act, this 29,000-acre wilderness area is governed under the National Wilderness Preservation System and the Wilderness Act. Both have strict guidelines when it comes to man-made structures in designated wilderness areas, and permanent improvements are not allowed within these areas.

Completed in 1845 by Nathaniel Davis, son-in-law of Abel and Hannah Crawford, Davis Path was the third and longest bridle path built to the summit of Mount Washington. The path was in use until 1853-1854, and then it was neglected and became unusable. In 1910, the Appalachian Mountain Club’s legendary Trail-builder Warren W. Hart (AMC’s councilor of improvements from 1908-1910), with the help of volunteers, re-opened it as a footpath. Two shelters, Camp Resolution and Camp Isolation, were built along Davis Path in 1912.

Resolution Shelter was located off of Davis Path in the federally designated Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness in the New Hampshire White Mountains during a snow storm. The Resolution shelter was closed in 2009 because of safety issues, and it was torn down in December of 2011.
(2007) Resolution Shelter – Davis Path, New Hampshire
 

Built of logs, the original Resolution shelter, "Camp Resolution”, was an open shelter that slept seven people. By the late 1920s, it was in poor condition, and it was rebuilt by the early 1930s (probably 1932). The new shelter slept ten people. This all took place prior to the area becoming a designated wilderness area.

Unfortunately, the second shelter also fell into disrepair, and because of safety concerns, it was closed in 2009. It was beyond repairing and would need to be rebuilt. But because the shelter site is now within a designated wilderness area, where man-made structures are generally not allowed or replaced, the decision was made to remove it.

Resolution Shelter Removal Project White Mountains, the Resolution shelter, located in the Dry River Wilderness, was closed in 2009 because of safety issues. The shelter was dismantled in December 2011 and volunteers will remove selected debris (asphalt shingles), scatter the logs throughout the area, and then the site will be rehabilitated. This is how the site looked in July 2012. This is a work in progress.
(July 2012) – Resolution Shelter Removal Project, New Hampshire
 

Honoring the values of the Wilderness Act, which governs the federally designated Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness, Forest Service made the decision in November 2011 to remove the shelter. It was dismantled in December 2011; the debris that wouldn't rot was removed from the wilderness, and the shelter logs were scattered around the area. The above photo shows how the shelter site looked in July 2012, while the work was still in progress.

To license any of the photos in this blog article for publications, click on the photo. And you can read more about the White Mountains here.

Happy image making..


 

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Erin Paul is a professional photographer, writer, and author who specializes in environmental conservation and historic preservation photography in the New Hampshire White Mountains. His work is published worldwide, and credits include; Backpacker Magazine, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, the Appalachian Mountain Club, and The Wilderness Society.

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