Posts Tagged: waterville valley



Sustainable Trail Work, White Mountains

Open stone culvert along the Mount Tecumseh Trail in New Hampshire.
Open Stone Culvert – Tecumseh Trail, New Hampshire
 

Sustainable Trail Work, White Mountains – Here in New Hampshire, all we hear about is environmental friendly and sustainable trail work. And how important it is to conserve the trails for future generations. As an environmental photographer, I support this approach to preserving the trail system. And up until a few years ago, I have always believed that the organizations maintaining our trails practiced what they preached.

I recently made my monthly hike to Mt Tecumseh to photograph the summit vandalism. I was on the Tecumseh Trail after a rainstorm and was surprised at how many open culverts (water bars) were dry. The purpose of a trail culvert is to drain water off and away from the trail, and the culverts included in this blog article were all dry.

Continue reading right arrow

Trail Work, Poor Trail Blaze Removal Practices

October 2011 - Trail blaze along the Mount Tecumseh Trail (ski area side) in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
October 2011 – New Trail Blaze, Mt Tecumseh Trail
 

Trail Work, Poor Trail Blaze Removal Practices Since 2011, I have been making regular trips to Waterville Valley, New Hampshire to photograph a yellow birch tree that has fallen victim to vandalism. The damaged tree, when ascending the trail, is on the right just after exiting the Irene reroute. I am using repeat photography to show the impact of improper trail blaze removal. This type of photography is useful for educating land stewards and others about responsible environmental stewardship.

In October 2011, I documented newly applied trail blazing (above) along the Mt Tecumseh Trail in Waterville Valley. Sometime in the spring of 2012, the blaze on the left side of the yellow birch tree in the above image was improperly removed from the tree. And a large wound (below) where rot, fungus, and insects could enter the tree was visible. The bark, where the blaze was, appeared to have been cut and peeled away from the tree.

Continue reading right arrow

Abandoned Vehicles, White Mountains

Rusted car in the Eastman Brook drainage of Thornton, New Hampshire.
Possibly a late 1920's / early 1930's Ford – Thornton, New Hampshire
 

Abandoned Vehicles, White Mountains – Over the years, I have documented a number of abandoned vehicles in the New Hampshire White Mountains, and today I want to share some of them with you. These forgotten relics make great photo subjects. Personally, I love coming across them in the middle of nowhere.

New England outdoor photographers should have a few abandoned vehicles on file. This type of imagery can be used in numerous ways to represent the outdoor environment. And some art collectors do like this type of subject matter for their walls.

Continue reading right arrow

Trail Work Erosion, White Mountains

October 2011 - Newly installed stonework along the Mt Tecumseh Trail in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. After an inspection by FS in June 2012, it has been suggested this issue (large holes on left) will need to be corrected by a professional trail crew. In less than one year the hillside is collapsing and the stonework is not holding up. See here: http://bit.ly/1qY9GZY.
October 2011 – New Stonework, Mt Tecumseh Trail
 

Trail Work Erosion, White Mountains – The included images show how a section of the Mt Tecumseh Trail in the New Hampshire White Mountains has elapsed over time. The first two images are from October 2011 and the last image is from October 2017. The intent of this visual journal is to record the progression of hillside erosion on the left-hand side of the trail and to document how this section of trail holds up to foot traffic.

I am using a technique known as photo monitoring to document this section of trail. Photo monitoring consists of repeat photography of an area over a period of time. Photo monitoring is used in land management to help recognize issues that are not immediately obvious from one or two visits to a location. The ending result is a permanent visual record and journal that showcases the environmental changes of a particular location.

Continue reading right arrow

Repaired Trail Blazing, Trail Maintenance

Trail blazing along the Mt Tecumseh Trail in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. A proper blaze is a two by six inch rectangle. Spills and runs should be wiped away when applied, and once dried runs can be removed using proper techniques. See trail maintenance guidelines if you are unsure on proper blazing protocol. After a trail inspection by Forest Service in June 2012, they (FS) stepped in on the ongoing work. This dripping blaze has been removed by proper parties.
September 2011 – Improper Trail Blazing, Mt Tecumseh Trail
 

Repaired Trail Blazing, Trail Maintenance – Some of the issues along the Mt Tecumseh Trail in Waterville Valley New Hampshire have been addressed and corrected by Forest Service. I commend Forest Service for correcting issues along this trail. And it is satisfying to know they are taking the needed steps to improve the White Mountains trail system.

In 2011, while hiking the Mt Tecumseh Trail, I noted a trail blazing issue, so I reported it to Forest Service. The trail blazing was not per trail maintenance guidelines and ruined the overall beauty of the trail. The Ranger who looked into it and responded, via email, stated a bad can of paint was the cause. Included in this blog article are before & after photos of the trail blazing that was removed.

Continue reading right arrow

Mt Tecumseh Trail, New Hampshire

October 2011 -Drainage ditch / Stone steps along the Mount Tecumseh Trail in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. The area on the left is in the process of collapsing.  After a trail inspection by Forest Service in June 2012, they (FS) stepped in and took control of ongoing work along this trail. It has been suggested this erosion issue will need to be corrected by a professional trail crew.
October 2011 – New completed stonework / hillside stands out
 

Mt Tecumseh Trail, New Hampshire – Today I hiked the Mt Tecumseh Trail in Waterville Valley to photograph a section of fairly new stonework. In October of 2011 I was asked to photograph this work, and at the time I questioned the quality of work, so I have continued to photograph it. The included photos show that the hillside is collapsing, and the steps are not holding up. This section will need to be maintained indefinitely or properly fixed.

Continue reading right arrow

Fletcher Cascades, Waterville Valley

Fletcher Cascades during the spring months. Located on Drakes Brook in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire USA. This area was logged during the Mad River Logging Era. Fletcher Cascades is an excellent series of cascades to photograph during the spring months when brooks and rivers are running high from snow melt. In the summer season Fletcher cascades are no more than a trickle, but they are still worth the visit if you are in the area.
Fletcher Cascades – Waterville Valley, New Hampshire 
 

Fletcher Cascades, Waterville Valley – Fletcher Cascades is located on Drakes Brook in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire. During the spring snowmelt and after heavy rains (when brooks and rivers are running high), this is an excellent waterfall to photograph. The water level of Drakes Brook can be low during the summer months, but hiking to Fletcher Cascade is enjoyable any time of year.

I believe round trip is about 3 miles to the cascades using the Drakes Brook and Fletcher Cascades Trails, but do not quote me on this. I have never paid attention to the mileage. These cascades are one of my favorite spots to photograph when in the Waterville Valley area.

Continue reading right arrow